Archive for July 2014

Latest Minnesota Felony Jobs News

Three candidates run in primary to represent Ward 5
I am a felony prosecutor at the Hennepin County Attorney's Office, handling serious crimes, including homicides, rapes and robberies. I also have a decade of experience at two national law … vice-president and acting president. I am a past president …
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The Daily Swish: Glory Johnson's work on and off the court, Elena Delle Donne
The win keeps the Shock's playoff hopes mathematically alive and they look like they're starting to come together a bit after winning two in a row, but they could find themselves on the outside looking in after their next three games: Atlanta …
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Jeff Rodd pleads guilty, must pay back 000
Jeffrey Charles Rodd, 49, of Mound pleaded guilty April 28 in Redwood County Fifth District Court to felony issuance of a dishonored check and was sentenced July 21 to a stay of execution of a 12 months and one day stay with the Minnesota Department of …
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Driver who killed teen posts his totaled car online with smiley face
Under a second photo, he commented: “I'm all good slept a day in the hospital then came home and did yard work lol.” Vanwagner acknowledged … Vanwagner is on probation for a felony conviction in April for terroristic threats. Along with abstaining …
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Indiana Expungement Part 4 of 4

Nicole A. Bennett Westland Kramer & Bennett, P.C. http://www.wkb-law.com Lake County, Northwest Indiana, Criminal Defense Attorney 219-440-7550 Erasing your …
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323-464-6453 More DUI legal info: http://www.losangelescriminallawyer.pro/dui-expungements.html Call for a free consultation with the Kraut Law Group 24 hour…
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Cool Kentucky Felony Jobs images

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Image from page 196 of “Ben Hardin; his times and contemporaries, with selections from his speeches” (1887)
Kentucky Felony Jobs
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Identifier: benhardinhistime00litt
Title: Ben Hardin; his times and contemporaries, with selections from his speeches
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Little, Lucius P
Subjects: Hardin, Benjamin, 1784-1852
Publisher: Louisville [Ky.] Courier-journal job printing company

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Text Appearing Before Image:
nd full of dignity, unmixed with eitherarrogance or affectation. His countenance was habitually serene andbenignant.! He spoke apparently without preparation, yet Footeintimates that this was more apparent than real, and that he was •Olive Branch, by Gary. Bench and Bar, page 156. JOHN ROWAN, 77 simply adept in the ajs celare artem. He admits that Judge Grundycould be humorous when he chose, and sometimes indulged aninoffensive mimicry. His relations with Mr. Hardin were always kind. I remem-ber, said Mrs. Governor Helm, seeing Felix Grundy when I wasa school girl. It was at Dr. Burr Harrisons residence, in Bardstown.When I first saw him I took him for a red-faced Irishman. He wasa man of medium size, is my recollection. When he saw me, andwas told I was Ben Hardins daughter, he ran and caught and kissedme. II. -John Rowan. In a previous chapter, some of the incidents in the life of JudgeRowan, occurring prior to the year 1824, have been mentioned.Others are to be referred to now.

Text Appearing After Image:
Federal Hill, the Home of Judge rowan, at Bardstown.When a young man, he had taught school—or, as he sonorouslyexpressed it, on one occasion, engaged in the humble employmentof a pedagogue. In his early career at the bar he made his mark asa criminal lawyer. In the early years of his practice he received theappointment of prosecuting attorney. After convicting a young manof felony. Rowan experienced such compunctions that he resignedhis office, resolving never more to prosecute. Thereafter he onlyappeared for the defense. His defense of one Skaggs, tried for murder 12 1/8 BEN HARDIN. at Bardstown in 1798, was pronounced masterly, and obtained forhim a reputation which followed him through life as one of theablest lawyers at the bar of Kentucky, especially in criminal cases.* In 1803, he became involved in a personal difficulty, over a gameof cards, with Dr. Chambers, of Bardstown. In the course of theplay a dispute arose between them. Dr. Chambers was exceedinglyoverbearing and offe

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Martin P6M SeaMaster

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Martin P6M SeaMaster
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Image by james_gordon_losangeles
The Martin P6M SeaMaster, built by the Glenn L. Martin Company, was a 1950s strategic bomber flying boat for the United States Navy that almost entered service; production aircraft were built and Navy crews were undergoing operational conversion, with a service entry about six months off, when the program was cancelled on 21 August 1959. Envisioned as a way to give the Navy a strategic nuclear force, the SeaMaster was eclipsed by the Polaris submarine-launched ballistic missile. Due to the political situation at the Pentagon, the Navy promoted the P6M primarily as a high speed minelayer.

Design and development
In the immediate postwar defense climate, the United States Air Force’s Strategic Air Command was the lynchpin of the United States’ security as the sole means of delivery of the nation’s nuclear arsenal. The Navy saw its strategic role being eclipsed by the Air Force and knew both its prestige and budgets were at stake. Its first attempt, the USS United States, a large "super carrier" to launch Navy strategic bombers from, having been a victim of budget cuts, the Navy chose instead to create a "Seaplane Striking Force" useful for both nuclear and conventional warfare, including reconnaissance and minelaying. Groups of these planes, supported by seaplane tenders or even special submarines, could be located closer to the enemy, and as mobile targets would be harder to neutralize.

The requirement, issued in April 1951, was for a seaplane able to carry 30,000 lb (13,600 kg) of bombs to a target 1,500 miles (2,400 km) away from its aquatic base. The aircraft had to be capable of a low altitude attack run at Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h), which required an extremely capable aircraft. Both Convair and Martin submitted proposals, and the Martin one was chosen as more promising. An order for two prototypes was issued, which was projected to lead to six pre-production aircraft and a projected twenty-four production planes.

Originally the plane was to have a Curtiss-Wright turbo-ramjet engine, but this ran into problems and a more conventional Allison J71-A-4 turbojet was employed, fitted in pairs in overwing pods to keep the spray out of the intakes. Wings swept at 40° were used; they displayed a notable anhedral (downward slope to the tip) and were designed with tip tanks that doubled as floats on the water. Many features of Martin’s XB-51 bomber prototype were used, including an all-flying "T" tail and a rotating bomb bay—pneumatically sealed against seawater in the P6M.

Operational history
The first flight of the XP6M-1 came on 14 July 1955,[4] but early tests showed that the engines were mounted too close to the fuselage and scorched it when afterburners were used, leading to pointing the engines slightly outward in subsequent aircraft. Flight testing was initially successful, but, on 7 December 1955, a control system fault destroyed the first prototype with the loss of all aboard. The first prototype, BuNo 138821, c/n XP-1, disintegrated in flight at 5,000 feet due to the horizontal tail going to full up in control malfunction, subjecting the airframe to 9 g stress as it began an outside loop, crashing into the Potomac River near the junction of St. Mary’s River, killing four crew members: Navy pilot Lieutenant Commander Utgoff, and Martin employees, Morris Bernhard, assistant pilot, Herbert Scudder, flight engineer, and H.B. Coulon, flight test engineer.

Eleven months later, on 9 November 1956, the second prototype, BuNo 138822, c/n XP-2, first flown May 18, 1956, was also destroyed, due to a change made in the horizontal stabilizer control system without adequate evaluation before test flying the design. The crash occurred at 3:36 p.m. near Odessa, Delaware due to a faulty elevator jack. As the seaplane nosed up at ~21,000 feet and failed to respond to control inputs, the crew of four ejected, pilot Robert S. Turner, co-pilot William Cunningham, and two crew all parachuting to safety. The airframe broke up after falling to 6,000 feet before impact.

The first pre-production YP6M-1 was completed about a year later, with testing resuming in January 1958.

Five more were built in 1958 when the Navy announced that Harvey Point Defense Testing Facility in Hertford, North Carolina, would serve as the testing grounds for the fleet of Martin P6M SeaMasters. These aircraft were fitted with test versions of the full combat equipment suite and were used for bombing, mine laying and reconnaissance evaluations. The P6M-1 test program was mostly successful, however the J71 engines proved far less reliable than required. The P6M-1 had spray ingestion problems at high gross weight which precluded takeoffs except under ideal conditions.[6] The P6M-1 also had a serious control deficiency due to porpoising under some trim settings.[7] These deficiencies resulted in the P6M-1 program being cut, as it was no longer considered possible for it to be a successful asset. The P6M-1 had been generally successful, the airplane was designed to meet a demanding set of specifications, and had mostly achieved them.

The Navy and Martin felt that a new version, the P6M-2 would provide a useful aircraft. The first was rolled out in early 1959. Changes included new, more powerful Pratt & Whitney J75 engines, an aerial refueling probe, improved avionics, and a canopy with better visibility. A buddy refueling drogue kit had also been developed to fit in the bomb bay. Three had been built by summer 1959 and Navy crews were moving them through operational conversion when the program was abruptly canceled in August of that year.

The P6M-2 was an impressive aircraft; its Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h) performance "on the deck" could be equaled by few aircraft of the time, and few today. The planes were built incredibly tough, with the aircraft skin at the wing roots over one inch (25 mm) thick. The men managing the test program were shocked when the docile and pleasant handling characteristics of the P6M-1 were replaced by some severe compressibility effects above Mach 0.8. These included rapid changes in directional trim, severe buffeting, and wing drop requiring high control inputs to counter. Until those problems were fixed, the P6M-2 could not be considered for use by the Fleet.[8] The problems were caused by the larger engine nacelles required for the J75s. There were also problems on the water, including a tendency for the tip floats to dig in under certain situations, and engine surges. These problems were eventually solved, but time had run out for the SeaMaster just as the first crews were training for its operational debut. The major defense budget cuts of the Eisenhower administration were forcing the Navy to make choices. In August 1959 Martin was told to halt operations; the program was going to be canceled. Seaplanes were a small community in Naval Aviation, and the P6M, significantly over budget and behind schedule, was competing with aircraft carriers for funding. The Navy had an impending superior system for the nuclear strike role, the Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine.

Although the technology of the P6M was phenomenal, in the age of the ICBM and SLBM, the manned bomber was considered an expensive, unreliable way to deliver nuclear weapons. The P6M program had already cost 0 million (about .5 billion in 2004 dollars) and could not be justified without the strategic mission.

All of the aircraft were scrapped. Some tail sections were retained for testing, and one of these is now in the Glenn L. Martin museum.

Martin tried unsuccessfully to market the technology in the civilian market, with a SeaMaster version called the SeaMistress but there were no takers,[9] and the company soon abandoned the aircraft business entirely to focus on missiles and electronics. The P6M was the final aircraft constructed by the Glenn L. Martin Company.

Specifications (P6M-2)

General characteristics

Crew: 4
Length: 134 ft 0 in (40.84 m)
Wingspan: 102 ft 11 in (31.37 m)
Height: 32 ft 5 in (9.88 m)
Wing area: 1,900 ft² (180 m²)
Empty weight: 91,300 lb (41,400 kg)
Loaded weight: 120,000 lb (54,000 kg)
Max. takeoff weight: 176,400 lb (80,000 kg)
Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney J75-P-2 turbojets, 17,500 lbf (77.8 kN) each
Performance

Maximum speed: 550 kt (630 mph, 1,010 km/h)
Range: 1,700 nm (2,000 mi, 3,200 km)
Service ceiling: 40,000 ft (12,000 m)
Rate of climb: ft/min (m/s)
Wing loading: 63 lb/ft² (310 kg/m²)
Thrust/weight: 0.58

Armament
Guns: 2× 20 mm cannon in tail turret
Bombs: 30,000 lb (14,000 kg)

Martin P6M SeaMaster
Resume Tips
Image by james_gordon_losangeles
The Martin P6M SeaMaster, built by the Glenn L. Martin Company, was a 1950s strategic bomber flying boat for the United States Navy that almost entered service; production aircraft were built and Navy crews were undergoing operational conversion, with a service entry about six months off, when the program was cancelled on 21 August 1959. Envisioned as a way to give the Navy a strategic nuclear force, the SeaMaster was eclipsed by the Polaris submarine-launched ballistic missile. Due to the political situation at the Pentagon, the Navy promoted the P6M primarily as a high speed minelayer.

Design and development
In the immediate postwar defense climate, the United States Air Force’s Strategic Air Command was the lynchpin of the United States’ security as the sole means of delivery of the nation’s nuclear arsenal. The Navy saw its strategic role being eclipsed by the Air Force and knew both its prestige and budgets were at stake. Its first attempt, the USS United States, a large "super carrier" to launch Navy strategic bombers from, having been a victim of budget cuts, the Navy chose instead to create a "Seaplane Striking Force" useful for both nuclear and conventional warfare, including reconnaissance and minelaying. Groups of these planes, supported by seaplane tenders or even special submarines, could be located closer to the enemy, and as mobile targets would be harder to neutralize.

The requirement, issued in April 1951, was for a seaplane able to carry 30,000 lb (13,600 kg) of bombs to a target 1,500 miles (2,400 km) away from its aquatic base. The aircraft had to be capable of a low altitude attack run at Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h), which required an extremely capable aircraft. Both Convair and Martin submitted proposals, and the Martin one was chosen as more promising. An order for two prototypes was issued, which was projected to lead to six pre-production aircraft and a projected twenty-four production planes.

Originally the plane was to have a Curtiss-Wright turbo-ramjet engine, but this ran into problems and a more conventional Allison J71-A-4 turbojet was employed, fitted in pairs in overwing pods to keep the spray out of the intakes. Wings swept at 40° were used; they displayed a notable anhedral (downward slope to the tip) and were designed with tip tanks that doubled as floats on the water. Many features of Martin’s XB-51 bomber prototype were used, including an all-flying "T" tail and a rotating bomb bay—pneumatically sealed against seawater in the P6M.

Operational history
The first flight of the XP6M-1 came on 14 July 1955,[4] but early tests showed that the engines were mounted too close to the fuselage and scorched it when afterburners were used, leading to pointing the engines slightly outward in subsequent aircraft. Flight testing was initially successful, but, on 7 December 1955, a control system fault destroyed the first prototype with the loss of all aboard. The first prototype, BuNo 138821, c/n XP-1, disintegrated in flight at 5,000 feet due to the horizontal tail going to full up in control malfunction, subjecting the airframe to 9 g stress as it began an outside loop, crashing into the Potomac River near the junction of St. Mary’s River, killing four crew members: Navy pilot Lieutenant Commander Utgoff, and Martin employees, Morris Bernhard, assistant pilot, Herbert Scudder, flight engineer, and H.B. Coulon, flight test engineer.

Eleven months later, on 9 November 1956, the second prototype, BuNo 138822, c/n XP-2, first flown May 18, 1956, was also destroyed, due to a change made in the horizontal stabilizer control system without adequate evaluation before test flying the design. The crash occurred at 3:36 p.m. near Odessa, Delaware due to a faulty elevator jack. As the seaplane nosed up at ~21,000 feet and failed to respond to control inputs, the crew of four ejected, pilot Robert S. Turner, co-pilot William Cunningham, and two crew all parachuting to safety. The airframe broke up after falling to 6,000 feet before impact.

The first pre-production YP6M-1 was completed about a year later, with testing resuming in January 1958.

Five more were built in 1958 when the Navy announced that Harvey Point Defense Testing Facility in Hertford, North Carolina, would serve as the testing grounds for the fleet of Martin P6M SeaMasters. These aircraft were fitted with test versions of the full combat equipment suite and were used for bombing, mine laying and reconnaissance evaluations. The P6M-1 test program was mostly successful, however the J71 engines proved far less reliable than required. The P6M-1 had spray ingestion problems at high gross weight which precluded takeoffs except under ideal conditions.[6] The P6M-1 also had a serious control deficiency due to porpoising under some trim settings.[7] These deficiencies resulted in the P6M-1 program being cut, as it was no longer considered possible for it to be a successful asset. The P6M-1 had been generally successful, the airplane was designed to meet a demanding set of specifications, and had mostly achieved them.

The Navy and Martin felt that a new version, the P6M-2 would provide a useful aircraft. The first was rolled out in early 1959. Changes included new, more powerful Pratt & Whitney J75 engines, an aerial refueling probe, improved avionics, and a canopy with better visibility. A buddy refueling drogue kit had also been developed to fit in the bomb bay. Three had been built by summer 1959 and Navy crews were moving them through operational conversion when the program was abruptly canceled in August of that year.

The P6M-2 was an impressive aircraft; its Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h) performance "on the deck" could be equaled by few aircraft of the time, and few today. The planes were built incredibly tough, with the aircraft skin at the wing roots over one inch (25 mm) thick. The men managing the test program were shocked when the docile and pleasant handling characteristics of the P6M-1 were replaced by some severe compressibility effects above Mach 0.8. These included rapid changes in directional trim, severe buffeting, and wing drop requiring high control inputs to counter. Until those problems were fixed, the P6M-2 could not be considered for use by the Fleet.[8] The problems were caused by the larger engine nacelles required for the J75s. There were also problems on the water, including a tendency for the tip floats to dig in under certain situations, and engine surges. These problems were eventually solved, but time had run out for the SeaMaster just as the first crews were training for its operational debut. The major defense budget cuts of the Eisenhower administration were forcing the Navy to make choices. In August 1959 Martin was told to halt operations; the program was going to be canceled. Seaplanes were a small community in Naval Aviation, and the P6M, significantly over budget and behind schedule, was competing with aircraft carriers for funding. The Navy had an impending superior system for the nuclear strike role, the Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine.

Although the technology of the P6M was phenomenal, in the age of the ICBM and SLBM, the manned bomber was considered an expensive, unreliable way to deliver nuclear weapons. The P6M program had already cost 0 million (about .5 billion in 2004 dollars) and could not be justified without the strategic mission.

All of the aircraft were scrapped. Some tail sections were retained for testing, and one of these is now in the Glenn L. Martin museum.

Martin tried unsuccessfully to market the technology in the civilian market, with a SeaMaster version called the SeaMistress but there were no takers,[9] and the company soon abandoned the aircraft business entirely to focus on missiles and electronics. The P6M was the final aircraft constructed by the Glenn L. Martin Company.

Specifications (P6M-2)

General characteristics

Crew: 4
Length: 134 ft 0 in (40.84 m)
Wingspan: 102 ft 11 in (31.37 m)
Height: 32 ft 5 in (9.88 m)
Wing area: 1,900 ft² (180 m²)
Empty weight: 91,300 lb (41,400 kg)
Loaded weight: 120,000 lb (54,000 kg)
Max. takeoff weight: 176,400 lb (80,000 kg)
Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney J75-P-2 turbojets, 17,500 lbf (77.8 kN) each
Performance

Maximum speed: 550 kt (630 mph, 1,010 km/h)
Range: 1,700 nm (2,000 mi, 3,200 km)
Service ceiling: 40,000 ft (12,000 m)
Rate of climb: ft/min (m/s)
Wing loading: 63 lb/ft² (310 kg/m²)
Thrust/weight: 0.58

Armament
Guns: 2× 20 mm cannon in tail turret
Bombs: 30,000 lb (14,000 kg)

Martin P6M SeaMaster
Resume Tips
Image by james_gordon_losangeles
The Martin P6M SeaMaster, built by the Glenn L. Martin Company, was a 1950s strategic bomber flying boat for the United States Navy that almost entered service; production aircraft were built and Navy crews were undergoing operational conversion, with a service entry about six months off, when the program was cancelled on 21 August 1959. Envisioned as a way to give the Navy a strategic nuclear force, the SeaMaster was eclipsed by the Polaris submarine-launched ballistic missile. Due to the political situation at the Pentagon, the Navy promoted the P6M primarily as a high speed minelayer.

Design and development
In the immediate postwar defense climate, the United States Air Force’s Strategic Air Command was the lynchpin of the United States’ security as the sole means of delivery of the nation’s nuclear arsenal. The Navy saw its strategic role being eclipsed by the Air Force and knew both its prestige and budgets were at stake. Its first attempt, the USS United States, a large "super carrier" to launch Navy strategic bombers from, having been a victim of budget cuts, the Navy chose instead to create a "Seaplane Striking Force" useful for both nuclear and conventional warfare, including reconnaissance and minelaying. Groups of these planes, supported by seaplane tenders or even special submarines, could be located closer to the enemy, and as mobile targets would be harder to neutralize.

The requirement, issued in April 1951, was for a seaplane able to carry 30,000 lb (13,600 kg) of bombs to a target 1,500 miles (2,400 km) away from its aquatic base. The aircraft had to be capable of a low altitude attack run at Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h), which required an extremely capable aircraft. Both Convair and Martin submitted proposals, and the Martin one was chosen as more promising. An order for two prototypes was issued, which was projected to lead to six pre-production aircraft and a projected twenty-four production planes.

Originally the plane was to have a Curtiss-Wright turbo-ramjet engine, but this ran into problems and a more conventional Allison J71-A-4 turbojet was employed, fitted in pairs in overwing pods to keep the spray out of the intakes. Wings swept at 40° were used; they displayed a notable anhedral (downward slope to the tip) and were designed with tip tanks that doubled as floats on the water. Many features of Martin’s XB-51 bomber prototype were used, including an all-flying "T" tail and a rotating bomb bay—pneumatically sealed against seawater in the P6M.

Operational history
The first flight of the XP6M-1 came on 14 July 1955,[4] but early tests showed that the engines were mounted too close to the fuselage and scorched it when afterburners were used, leading to pointing the engines slightly outward in subsequent aircraft. Flight testing was initially successful, but, on 7 December 1955, a control system fault destroyed the first prototype with the loss of all aboard. The first prototype, BuNo 138821, c/n XP-1, disintegrated in flight at 5,000 feet due to the horizontal tail going to full up in control malfunction, subjecting the airframe to 9 g stress as it began an outside loop, crashing into the Potomac River near the junction of St. Mary’s River, killing four crew members: Navy pilot Lieutenant Commander Utgoff, and Martin employees, Morris Bernhard, assistant pilot, Herbert Scudder, flight engineer, and H.B. Coulon, flight test engineer.

Eleven months later, on 9 November 1956, the second prototype, BuNo 138822, c/n XP-2, first flown May 18, 1956, was also destroyed, due to a change made in the horizontal stabilizer control system without adequate evaluation before test flying the design. The crash occurred at 3:36 p.m. near Odessa, Delaware due to a faulty elevator jack. As the seaplane nosed up at ~21,000 feet and failed to respond to control inputs, the crew of four ejected, pilot Robert S. Turner, co-pilot William Cunningham, and two crew all parachuting to safety. The airframe broke up after falling to 6,000 feet before impact.

The first pre-production YP6M-1 was completed about a year later, with testing resuming in January 1958.

Five more were built in 1958 when the Navy announced that Harvey Point Defense Testing Facility in Hertford, North Carolina, would serve as the testing grounds for the fleet of Martin P6M SeaMasters. These aircraft were fitted with test versions of the full combat equipment suite and were used for bombing, mine laying and reconnaissance evaluations. The P6M-1 test program was mostly successful, however the J71 engines proved far less reliable than required. The P6M-1 had spray ingestion problems at high gross weight which precluded takeoffs except under ideal conditions.[6] The P6M-1 also had a serious control deficiency due to porpoising under some trim settings.[7] These deficiencies resulted in the P6M-1 program being cut, as it was no longer considered possible for it to be a successful asset. The P6M-1 had been generally successful, the airplane was designed to meet a demanding set of specifications, and had mostly achieved them.

The Navy and Martin felt that a new version, the P6M-2 would provide a useful aircraft. The first was rolled out in early 1959. Changes included new, more powerful Pratt & Whitney J75 engines, an aerial refueling probe, improved avionics, and a canopy with better visibility. A buddy refueling drogue kit had also been developed to fit in the bomb bay. Three had been built by summer 1959 and Navy crews were moving them through operational conversion when the program was abruptly canceled in August of that year.

The P6M-2 was an impressive aircraft; its Mach 0.9 (1,100 km/h) performance "on the deck" could be equaled by few aircraft of the time, and few today. The planes were built incredibly tough, with the aircraft skin at the wing roots over one inch (25 mm) thick. The men managing the test program were shocked when the docile and pleasant handling characteristics of the P6M-1 were replaced by some severe compressibility effects above Mach 0.8. These included rapid changes in directional trim, severe buffeting, and wing drop requiring high control inputs to counter. Until those problems were fixed, the P6M-2 could not be considered for use by the Fleet.[8] The problems were caused by the larger engine nacelles required for the J75s. There were also problems on the water, including a tendency for the tip floats to dig in under certain situations, and engine surges. These problems were eventually solved, but time had run out for the SeaMaster just as the first crews were training for its operational debut. The major defense budget cuts of the Eisenhower administration were forcing the Navy to make choices. In August 1959 Martin was told to halt operations; the program was going to be canceled. Seaplanes were a small community in Naval Aviation, and the P6M, significantly over budget and behind schedule, was competing with aircraft carriers for funding. The Navy had an impending superior system for the nuclear strike role, the Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine.

Although the technology of the P6M was phenomenal, in the age of the ICBM and SLBM, the manned bomber was considered an expensive, unreliable way to deliver nuclear weapons. The P6M program had already cost 0 million (about .5 billion in 2004 dollars) and could not be justified without the strategic mission.

All of the aircraft were scrapped. Some tail sections were retained for testing, and one of these is now in the Glenn L. Martin museum.

Martin tried unsuccessfully to market the technology in the civilian market, with a SeaMaster version called the SeaMistress but there were no takers,[9] and the company soon abandoned the aircraft business entirely to focus on missiles and electronics. The P6M was the final aircraft constructed by the Glenn L. Martin Company.

Specifications (P6M-2)

General characteristics

Crew: 4
Length: 134 ft 0 in (40.84 m)
Wingspan: 102 ft 11 in (31.37 m)
Height: 32 ft 5 in (9.88 m)
Wing area: 1,900 ft² (180 m²)
Empty weight: 91,300 lb (41,400 kg)
Loaded weight: 120,000 lb (54,000 kg)
Max. takeoff weight: 176,400 lb (80,000 kg)
Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney J75-P-2 turbojets, 17,500 lbf (77.8 kN) each
Performance

Maximum speed: 550 kt (630 mph, 1,010 km/h)
Range: 1,700 nm (2,000 mi, 3,200 km)
Service ceiling: 40,000 ft (12,000 m)
Rate of climb: ft/min (m/s)
Wing loading: 63 lb/ft² (310 kg/m²)
Thrust/weight: 0.58

Armament
Guns: 2× 20 mm cannon in tail turret
Bombs: 30,000 lb (14,000 kg)

Benefits of hiring ex-offenders

Nancy Rider explains the many benefits of hiring ex-offenders.
Video Rating: 1 / 5

Kentucky pastor: No politician speaking better to issues of black community than Rand Paul

WHAS 11 in Louisville, Kentucky – 9/17/13 www.whas11.com/news/local/Louisville-minister-applauds-Rand-Paul-224112951.html twitter.com/KWCosby Rand Paul Kevin…

Jobs in St. Lucia and the Caribbean 2014 StLucia Job Opportunities

CLICK HERE http://business.allhelpfulreviews.com/how-do-you-start-an-internet-business-from-home-starting-a-business-2014 Jobs in St. Lucia and the Caribbean 2014 StLucia Job Opportunities…
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Felony or Misdemeanor in Raleigh NC? | Attorney Randolph J. Hill

Have you been charged with a feolony or misdemeanor in Raleigh North Carolina, such as: Capital murder, murder and attempted murder Breaking and entering, ar…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Foster parent charged with murder in hot car death

Foster parent charged with murder in hot car death
But Sedgwick County District Attorney Marc Bennett said the charge was warranted because the child died during the commission of an inherently dangerous felony, aggravated endangering of a child. Both sides agree the circumstances are entirely …
Read more on kwwl.com

Bookings at the Woodbury County Jail, 27 felony arrests
Victoria Lynette Ernst, 43, of Le Mars, Iowa, was arrested April 1 by Woodbury County deputies on felony charges of vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of a personal injury accident. Jose Luis Cruz-Cuilty, 46, of Sioux City, was arrested April 2 …
Read more on Sioux City Journal

Broken water main floods UCLA campus

Broken water main floods UCLA campus
This slideshow contains mug shots of individuals that have been arrested for a variety of crimes in Las Vegas and surrounding areas. These individuals may or may not have been convicted of any crimes. All individuals are presumed innocent until proven …
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Greenpeace attorneys question P&G's damage claim
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Read more on WKEF ABC 22

OSP investigating crash that killed pedestrian
Brad Shaw, spokesman for the Ohio State Highway Patrol, said the state patrol is only investigating the crash and declined to comment on the preliminary investigation. A funeral service has been scheduled for 11 a.m. Friday at Mount Calvary Missionary …
Read more on Dayton Daily News