Archive for July 2015

Image from page 584 of “Harper’s weekly” (1857)

A few nice Resume writing images I found:

Image from page 584 of “Harper’s weekly” (1857)
Resume writing
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Identifier: harpersweeklyv9bonn
Title: Harper’s weekly
Year: 1857 (1850s)
Authors: Bonner, John, 1828-1899 Curtis, George William, 1824-1892 Alden, Henry Mills, 1836-1919 Conant, Samuel Stillman, 1831-1885? Schuyler, Montgomery, 1843-1914 Foord, John, 1842-1922 Davis, Richard Harding, 1864-1916 Schurz, Carl, 1829-1906 Nelson, Henry Loomis, 1846-1908 Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862-1922 Harvey, George Brinton McClellan, 1864-1928 Hapgood, Norman, 1868-1937
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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Text Appearing Before Image:
he.Lul Win/, Miy he wn* killing iie.re Vniike.-s Umlh tl,.–i. tth »eiv .-eiviii- „t the IV ; V, !l lie– hud mid othi-i-.- I inlJ 11 hi. »v..r<- L..t ..vol-the deml li JasiesH. Davidson, a member ..f the low-airy, testified in regard to ainilber mail wlio hiUieiiei up his rl-iliit;, nlii.ii lie In..) h n-ln-.i, 1.die otitic BWCC3 blew ovei i.hu de.id Ime. i k- . 1,-p 1 t 1 ,1, .e. Ii- Wii–. ei-MVL-ynn! m lh- w:…_-..n „in, ill..- .]■■.1 nnii : Hi.- uih,,-,bad ft-en mm .n[arv,.,l |„ denth. Food r-i- so srnree :iton- time tlifit rolu…|-ra.!., ,… ;;. HI. had :dn.:t.h (.;.- ..| H:,-…i,:n iliesyetem. A paper was then olfered in evidence signed byWirz and indorsed by Wisper, being a ivporl furthe month of August, 1S1S4, showing that the ag- whom 2293 died. The report states that 25 es-caped prisoners were token up by the dogs. Thomas Hall, a prisoner at Andersonville, ileposed that of a squad of ninety prisoners under hischarge only one escaped death. When the poor

Text Appearing After Image:
September 4 the trial was resumed from .Saturday.After some evidence corroboratory of that al-ready given, Joseph K. Achuff, a prisoner at

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 347 of “Home instruction for sheet metal workers” (1922)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: homeinstructionf00neub
Title: Home instruction for sheet metal workers
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Neubecker, William, 1864- [from old catalog] Morio, Frank X., [from old catalog] ed Metal worker, plumber and steam fitter. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Sheet-metal work
Publisher: New York, U. P. C. book company, inc.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Fig. 487 | Fig.: 487-88. Operations in Forming Molding. draw it out to dot 15 as N, Fig. 483, and make the proper bendindicated by O. Take out and reverse sheet O as O, Fig. 484, and close the

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 489 Figs.489-90. Operations in Forming Molding. top clamp on dot 14; in doing this the lower part of panel astrikes against the bending leaf and causes the bend at b to spring,which will resume its original shape when the square bend ismade on dot 14, as P. Leave the sheet P in the brake, draw out to dot 13 as P, Fig.485, and make a square bend on 13 as indicated by R: ReverseR, Fig. 486, and close top clamp on dot 12; in doing so the pre- 342 Home Instruction for Sheet Metal Workers vious angle will be pressed out of shape at b, because panel astrikes against the bending leaf. Make a square bend on dot 12 as S. Now press S down toobtain a square angle at b1, using the hammer as in Fig. 480,which will bring the sheet as T, Fig. 486. Reverse T, Fig. 487,and make a square bend on dot 11, as U. Reverse U, Fig. 488, andclose top clamp on dot 10, which will cause the previous angleto spring slightly at b because the panel forces against the bend-ing leaf at a, and make a square bend o

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: main hall panorama

Some cool Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: main hall panorama
Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease
Image by Chris Devers
See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Steven F. Udvar-Hazy | _details_pending_:

That Was the Year That Was – 1997
Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease
Image by brizzle born and bred
1997 Gas (Petrol) was .22 a gallon in the US and 2 Pounds 70 pence in the UK , Great Britain handed back Hong Kong to China and the Dow was at less than 8000 . The first signs of the dreaded Bird Flu in China where the first documented case of the jump to humans causes Hong Kong to kill 1.25 million chickens. In the UK Tony Blair is the prime minister and Princess Diana dies in a car accident. Microsoft becomes the worlds most valuable company valued at 1 billion dollars. Internet Explorer version 4 released. The comet Hale-Bopp has its closest approach to earth. Microsoft buys minority stake in Apple Computers for 0 million.

1997 Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Eurovision victory, Film: Titanic, Friends, Girl Power is born, Harry Potter: J.K Rowling released the first book. Northern Lights: Philip Pullman also began a fantasy series, The X Files, The Nintendo 64 was released, I’m Alan Partridge hit our TV screens, Final Fantasy VII, South Park, Ally MacBeal made its debut, EastEnders: Rickaaaaayyyy and Bianca marry, Britain was walking on sunshine when Katrina and the Waves took us to a long awaited victory in the singing competition with Love Shine a Light. Well played Katrina, for a while Eurovision Fever became a bit of a thing again. Channel 5 started, Robot Wars was built, The Teletubbies entertained all children and Princess Diana’s funeral watched by 1.5 billion people around the world.

Things You Were Doing on the Computer in 1997

It’s easy to complain about the state of current consumer electronics. You may, say, wish your laptop didn’t get hot enough to cook a panini. Or that the Wi-Fi in your apartment didn’t always have your Netflix buffering. Or maybe that your browser didn’t always crash when you opened your 115th tab. As much as you may grumble about your gadgets and services, just know this: We’re much better off now than we once were. To illustrate that point, we took a look back at the year 1997 to see how things used to be.

Before people were filling their hard drives with MP3s, the best way to hear new music on the Internet was with Real Player. (Napster would be released two years later, and WinAmp was just getting started). Before music blogs, the best you could do was dig through forums to stream new songs, which you would then bookmark to play later. And you’re mad that Spotify Premium is ?

In ’97, the top three computer (hardware) companies were IBM, Dell, and Hewlett-Packard. (Apple’s iMac wouldn’t drop for another year.) But what kid wanted an IBM computer? I didn’t know any. Everyone who wasn’t building their own wanted a HP or a Dell. We’re guessing you were the same way.

Not only did Microsoft have a near monopoly on computer operating systems, it also made the only word processor that mattered. Sure, you could use Word Perfect and be fine, but your school probably used Word. So, all that formatting you spent the night working on would go to waste if you weren’t rocking with the best. For those (like me), who were stuck with the struggle that was Microsoft Works, which also wasn’t compatible with Microsoft Office (WTF?), be happy those days are over.

If you’re parents didn’t shell out money each month to keep "You got mail!" ringing throughout the crib, you were more than likely going through a ton of the free discs they mailed to your house unsolicited. If you weren’t on that hustle, you were at least using AOL instant messenger to keep stay connected to your friends during your two hours of Internet use a day.

Seeing as how by 1997 Microsoft had completely dominated the personal computer industry with the release of 95, there’s a great chance that you were using what some still consider the best version of Windows ever made. It introduced some of Windows hallmark features like the Start Menu and the task bar, and set the tone for nearly every release to follow. It was so popular, you probably didn’t stop using it until Windows XP dropped in 2001.

Now-a-days people complain about smartphones that don’t come with a high-speed LTE Internet connection. Back in 1997 some people would have killed for the ability to download files at 18.6 megabits per second on their computer. But no, back then all we had was a 28.8kbps (or, if you were lucky, 33.7kbps) connection that made downloading certain, um, pictures a tiresome experience.

Google wasn’t founded until September 4, 1998, so in ’97 your options for searching the web were limited to the motley crew of crawlers that were jokeying for the top stop. This was a time when, if you asked 10 different people what search engines they used, seven of the people would tell you six different search engines, and the last three would ask you, "What is a search engine?" The good ol’ days.

Even though Microsoft included a version of Internet Explorer with Windows 95, the superior Netscape Navigator was still the king of the hill, commanding 54% of the browser compared to Microsoft’s 39 to 45% (depending on which study you read).

The iPhone 5 has a resolution of 1136×640 pixels. The average resolution of CRT monitors, because a flat screen LCD was out of the question, was 640×480. Let that marinate the when you start complaining about not being able to afford the iPhone 5S.

Only a few people will relate, as most of us couldn’t afford CD burners for at least two more years. But, for those that could afford drop nearly a G on a CD burner, you were, without a doubt, the coolest kid on the block.

TV Soaps

1997 was the year that the Battersby clan descended on Coronation Street, shaking up the sleepy soap in a way that angered many viewers. The behaviour of the clan, which included Les headbutting Curly Watts, had viewers outraged but they certainly pulled in some new fans and, since they were toned down, they became fairly likeable characters in their own right.

Sir Cliff Richard enjoyed a hearty pint in the Rovers Return with Andy McDonald (played by Nicholas Cochrane) and Liz McDonald (Beverly Callard) as he appeared as an extra on Coronation Street back in 1997.

It was a big year for Emmerdale. Not only were they granted a third weekly episode but they celebrated 25 years of being on air in true soap style: with a bit of carnage. Linda Fowler was killed when a drug fuelled Lord Alex Oakwell crashed their car into a tree.

EastEnders: Rickaaaaayyyy and Bianca marry.

22–25 September – BBC 1 soap EastEnders airs a series of episodes from Ireland which attract criticism from viewers and the Irish embassy because of their negative and stereotypical portrayal of Irish people. The BBC later issues an apology for any offence the episodes caused.

Death of a Princess

Diana, Princess of Wales, has died after a car crash in Paris. She was taken to hospital in the early hours of Sunday morning where surgeons tried for two hours to save her life but she died at 0300 BST. In a statement Buckingham Palace said the Queen and the Prince of Wales were "deeply shocked and distressed". Prince Charles broke the news of their mother’s death to Princes William and Harry at Balmoral Castle in Scotland where the royal family had been spending the summer.

The accident happened after the princess left the Ritz Hotel in the French capital with her companion, Dodi Al Fayed – son of Harrods owner, Mohammed Al Fayed.

Criminal investigation: Dodi Al Fayed and the vehicle’s driver were also killed in the collision in a tunnel under the Place de l’Alma in the centre of the city. The princess’ Mercedes car was apparently being pursued at high speed by photographers on motorbikes when it hit a pillar and smashed into a wall. Mr Al Fayed and the chauffeur died at the scene but the princess and her bodyguard were cut from the wreckage and rushed to hospital.

The French authorities have begun a criminal investigation and are questioning seven photographers. Tributes to the princess have been pouring in from around the world. Speaking from his home in South Africa, the princess’ brother, Lord Charles Spencer, said his sister had been "unique". While it was not the time for recriminations there was no doubt the press had played a part in her death, the earl added. Hundreds of mourners have gathered at the princess’ London home, Kensington Palace and many have laid flowers at the gates.

Only Princess Diana’s bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones, survived the crash. Blood tests showed the driver, Henri Paul, had taken both drugs and a large amount of alcohol before the accident. The royal family was criticised for its reserve during a time when there was an unprecedented national outpouring of grief. Around one million people lined the streets to see the princess’ funeral cortege as it made its way to Westminster Abbey in early September.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ip3_Fl4KM8

No charges were brought against the paparazzi who had been pursuing the princess’ car. But the behaviour of the press came under close scrutiny and the code governing the British media was tightened in December 1997. An inquest into the princess’s death was opened in the UK in 2004. It has been adjourned while the Metropolitan police, led by Lord Stevens, carry out an investigation into the crash. Retired judge Lady Elizabeth Butler-Sloss will conduct preliminary hearings into the inquests in early 2007.

"Candle in the Wind 1997" is a re-written and re-recorded version of Elton John’s 1973 hit song "Candle in the Wind". It was released on 13 September 1997 as a tribute single to the late Diana, Princess of Wales. In many countries, it was pressed a double A-side with "Something About the Way You Look Tonight". It was produced by Sir George Martin.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8gO0Z818j4

Tony Blair becomes Prime Minister

The Labour Party won the general election in a landslide victory, leaving the Conservatives in tatters after 18 years in power, with Scotland and Wales left devoid of Tory representation. Labour now has a formidable 419 seats (including the speaker) – the largest the party has ever taken. The Conservatives took just 165, their worst performance since 1906. Tony Blair – at 43 the youngest British prime minister this century – promised he would deliver "unity and purpose for the future".

John Major has resigned as Conservative leader, saying "When the curtain falls it’s time to get off the stage and that is what I propose to do." Many prominent Tories lost their seats. Liberal Democrat leader Paddy Ashdown was triumphant on a day that saw his party win 46 seats, the best achievement for a third party in more than 60 years.

1997 Timeline

1 January – 11 VCI children’s titles – out now on video.

7 January – Carlton Television presents Monarchy: The Nation Decides, a live studio debate discussing the future of the monarchy in the United Kingdom. The debate quickly descends into a shouting match, while viewers are encouraged to vote on the issue in what is the UK’s largest television phone poll. However, Carlton is forced to extend the deadline for calls following complaints from people unable to get through. Of the 2.6million callers who vote, 66% are in favour of retaining a monarch while 34% are against.

15 January – Diana, Princess of Wales calls for an international ban on landmines.

The strengthening economy is reflected in a national unemployment total of 1,884,700 for last December – the lowest level since January 1991, although the Conservative government who oversaw it are still behind Labour in the opinion polls as the general election looms.

16 January – The Conservative Party government loses its majority in the House of Commons after the death of Iain Mills, MP for Meriden.

17 January – A jury at the Old Bailey rules that 86-year-old Szymon Serafinowicz is unfit to stand trial on charges of murdering Jews during the Holocaust.

East 17 singer Brian Harvey is dismissed from the band after publicly commenting that the drug Ecstasy is safe.

20 January – Death of Labour Party MP Martin Redmond ends the government’s minority. On the same day, the party vows not to raise income tax if, as seems likely, it wins the forthcoming general election.

4 February – Moors Murderer Myra Hindley is informed by Home Secretary Michael Howard that she will never be released from prison. Hindley, who has now been in prison for more than 30 years, was originally issued with a whole life tariff by the then Home Secretary David Waddington in 1990, but not informed of the ruling until just over two years ago.

5 February – The first Wednesday edition of the National Lottery is aired with the introduction of a second weekly draw.

6 February – The Court of Appeal rules that Mrs Diane Blood of Leeds can be inseminated with her dead husband’s sperm. Mrs Blood had been challenging for the right to use the sperm of her husband Stephen since just after his death two years ago.

9 February – The live final of the 1997 Masters is interrupted by snooker’s first ever streaker, 22-year-old secretary Lianne Crofts, who invaded the playing area at the beginning of the third frame. After stewards removed her from the arena, Ronnie O’Sullivan amused the crowd by comically wiping the brow of veteran referee John Street, who was refereeing his final match of his career.

22 February – Scientists at the Roslin Institute announce the birth of a cloned sheep named Dolly seven months after the fact.

27 February – The government loses its Commons majority again after the Labour victory at the Wirral South by-election.

8 March – ITV begins showing the UK television rights to Formula One, after 18 years of coverage shown on the BBC.

10 March – 160 vehicles are involved in a motorway pile up on the M42 motorway at Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. Three people are killed and 60 injured.

17 March – John Major announces that the general election will be held on 1 May. Despite the opinion polls having shown a double digit lead almost continuously since late 1992, Major is hoping for a unique fifth successive term of Conservative government by pinning his hopes on a strong economy and low unemployment – no incoming government since before the First World War has inherited economic statistics as strong as the ones that Labour will should they win the election.

18 March – The Sun newspaper, a traditional supporter of the Conservative Party, declares its support for Tony Blair and Labour. It condemns the Conservatives as "tired, divided and rudderless" – a stark contrast to its support for them in the run-up to the 1992 election where it waged a high-profile campaign against the then Labour leader Neil Kinnock and, after the Conservative victory, claimed responsibility for the result.

23 March – Unemployed continues to fall and now stands at just over 1,800,000 – its lowest level since December 1990.

30 March – Channel 5, Britain’s fifth terrestrial television channel and its first new one since the launch of Channel 4 in November 1982, is launched.

31 March – BBC pre-school children’s television series Teletubbies first airs.

April – Nursery Education Voucher Scheme introduced, guaranteeing a government-funded contribution to the cost of preschool education for 4-year-olds.

5 April – The 1997 Grand National is delayed after a suspected IRA bomb threat. The race is run on Monday 7 April at 5:00 pm. It is the last of 50 Nationals (including the void race of 1993) to be commentated on by Peter O’Sullevan.

8 April – BBC journalist Martin Bell announces that he is to stand as a candidate against Neil Hamilton in the Tatton constituency on an anti-corruption platform.

A MORI opinion poll shows Conservative support at a four-year high of 34%, but Labour still look set to win next month’s general election as they have a 15-point lead.

29 April – The last MORI poll before the election tips Labour for a landslide victory as they gain 48% of the vote and a 20-point lead over the Conservatives.

1 May – General Election: The Labour Party under Tony Blair defeat the incumbent Conservatives under Prime Minister John Major to win the election in a landslide result, winning 418 seats. Several high profile Conservative MPs, including seven Cabinet ministers lose their seats, as do all conservative MPs in Scotland and Wales. Michael Portillo, who was tipped by many to be the next leader of the Conservatives, is among those who lose their seats. The Conservatives fail to make any gains. A record 119 women are now in parliament. Mohammad Sarwar, elected for Labour in Glasgow Govan, becomes the first ever Muslim MP.

2 May – Being the leader of the party holding a majority after the General Election, Tony Blair MP is appointed Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by The Queen.

3 May – Katrina and the Waves win the Eurovision Song Contest with the song Love Shine a Light, the first time the UK has won the competition since 1981.

6 May – New Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown announces that the Bank of England, central bank of the UK, is to assume independent responsibility for UK monetary policy.

19 May – The new Labour government announces that it will ban tobacco sponsorship of sporting events.

June – Ford enters the growing compact coupe market with its Puma, which uses the same chassis as the Ka and Fiesta.

2 June – The Halifax Building Society floats on the London Stock Exchange. Over 7.5 million customers of the Society become shareholders of the new bank, the largest extension of shareholders in UK history.

8 June – Faye Dempsey wins the eighth series of Stars in Their Eyes, performing as Olivia Newton-John.

12 June – Law Lords declare that former Home Secretary, Michael Howard, acted illegally in raising the minimum sentence of the two juveniles who committed the murder of James Bulger, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables, to 15 years. They also strip the government of setting minimum terms for prisoners aged under 18 who had received life or indefinite prison sentences.

19 June – The High Court of Justice delivers judgement, largely in favour of McDonald’s, in the libel case of McDonald’s Corporation v Steel & Morris ("the McLibel case"),
the longest trial in English legal history, against two environmental campaigners.

25 June – An auction of dresses owned by Diana, Princess of Wales, in Manhattan raises more than £2million for charity.

30 June – Publication of J. K. Rowling’s first Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

1 July – The UK transfers sovereignty of Hong Kong, the largest remaining British colony, to the People’s Republic of China as the 99 years lease on the territory formally ends. This event is widely considered by historians and commentators to mark the end of the British Empire, the largest imperial endeavour in the history of mankind.

2 July – Chancellor Gordon Brown launches the first Labour budget for nearly 20 years, which includes a further £3billion for education and healthcare, as well as a £3.5billion scheme to get single mothers, under 25’s and long term unemployed people back into work.

4 July – Russian carmaker Lada announces the end of imports to the United Kingdom after 23 years and some 350,000 sales of its low-priced, low-specification cars, which at their peak sold in excess of 30,000 cars a year, but managed just over 6,000 sales last year.

19 July – The IRA declares a ceasefire.

30 July – Sunderland’s Stadium of Light, the largest football club stadium to be built in England since the 1920s, is opened by the Duke of York.

31 July – Less than three months after the Labour landslide, Labour loses the Uxbridge by-election to the Conservatives.

2 August – John Major’s Prime Minister’s Resignation Honours are announced.

14 August – Derby County F.C. move into their new Pride Park stadium, but their inaugural match against Wimbledon in the FA Premier League is abandoned in the second half due to floodlight failure.

21 August – The new Oasis album, Be Here Now, is released – selling a record of more than 350,000 copies on its first day.

27 August – An international survey shows that British rail fares are the most expensive in the world and have risen by 12% since privatisation.

Stoke City F.C. move into their new Britannia Stadium, which is officially opened by football legend Sir Stanley Matthews.

31 August – Reports emerge in the early hours of the morning that Diana, Princess of Wales, has been injured in a car crash in Paris which has claimed the life of Dodi Fayed, the Harrods heir. Within four hours, it is confirmed that Diana has died in hospital as a result of her injuries. The United Kingdom and much of the rest of the world is plunged into widespread mourning.

1 September – French investigators reveal that Diana’s driver, Henri Paul, was over the drink-driving limit and had been travelling at speeds in excess of 100 mph before the crash that killed her. Lawyers for Mohamed Al-Fayed, father of Dodi Al-Fayed, lay the blame on the paparazzi who were pursuing the vehicle.

A new style of fifty pence coin is introduced.

Reebok Stadium, the new home of Bolton Wanderers F.C., is opened by deputy prime minister John Prescott.

5 September – The Queen makes a nationwide broadcast in tribute to Diana, Princess of Wales, following widespread criticism of the Royal Family’s response to her death.

6 September – The funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales takes place at Westminster Abbey, London followed by a private burial at the estate of the Earls Spencer in Althorp, Northamptonshire. The Earl Spencer, brother of Diana, attacks the Royal Family’s treatment of Diana in his funeral eulogy. TV coverage of the funeral is hosted by both BBC 1 and ITV, attracting an audience of more than 32,000,000 which falls just short of the national TV audience record set by the England national football team’s victorious World Cup final in 1966.

11 September – Referendum in Scotland on the creation of a national Parliament with devolved powers takes place. On two separate questions, voters back the plans both for a national Parliament and for it to have limited tax raising powers.

13 September – Release of Elton John’s Candle in the Wind remade as a tribute to Diana, Princess of Wales. This will be the second best-selling single worldwide of all time.

17 September – Police investigating the death of Diana, Princess of Wales reveal that the car in which she was travelling may have collided with a Fiat Uno seconds before hitting a concrete pillar.

18 September – Welsh devolution referendum on the creation of a national Assembly takes place. Voters in Wales narrowly back the plans.

Opening of Sensation exhibition of Young British Artists from the collection of Charles Saatchi at the Royal Academy in London. A portrait of Moors murderer Myra Hindley created from children’s handprints by artist Marcus Harvey is removed from display after vandal attacks.

25 September – A Saudi court sentences British nurse Lucille McLauchlan to eight years in prison and 500 lashes for being an accessory to the murder of Australian nurse Yvonne Gilford in December last year. Fellow British nurse Deborah Parry is charged with murder and could face the death penalty if found guilty. Ms Gilford’s brother Frank, is reported to be willing to accept £750,000 in "blood money" for Ms Parry’s life to be spared if she is found guilty. Foreign Secretary Robin Cook condemns the sentence of flogging against Ms McLauchlan as "wholly unacceptable in the modern world".

29 September – British scientists state that they have found a link between Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and eating of BSE-infected meat.

1 October – The final LTI FX4 London cab is produced after 39 years.

3 October – 14 VCI children’s titles all going to Paris.

4 October – The BBC introduces its new corporate logo across the corporation. As well as new idents for BBC1.

15 October – Andy Green driving the ThrustSSC sets a new land speed record of 763.035 mph (1227.99 km/h), the first time the sound barrier is broken on land.

24 October – WPC Nina Mackay, 25, is stabbed to death in Stratford, London, when entering a flat to arrest a Somali asylum seeker who was due to be deported.

4 November – BBC News launches a full-time online news service, having already created special websites for the 1995 budget as well as this year’s general election and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

6 November – Labour hold the Paisley South by-election despite a swing of 11.3% to the SNP.

12 November – Brazil’s Supreme Court refuses to extradite the Great Train Robber Ronnie Biggs to Britain.

17 November – Six Britons are among the 58 people killed by terrorists in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt.

20 November – The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

24 November – The British Library opens its first public reading room at its new London site on the Euston Road.

3 December – Andrew Evans, who was convicted of the 1972 murder of 14-year-old Judith Roberts in Tamworth, Staffordshire, has his conviction overturned by the Court of Appeal after the hearing is told he was being treated for depression when he confessed to the crime, and there is no other evidence against him.

10 December – John E. Walker wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry jointly with Paul D. Boyer "for their elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism underlying the synthesis of
adenosine triphosphate (ATP)".

11 December – The Royal Yacht Britannia is decommissioned after 44 years in service.

18 December – The bill to establish the Scottish Parliament unveiled by Secretary of State for Scotland Donald Dewar.

19 December – William Hague marries Ffion Jenkins.

Moors murderer Myra Hindley loses a High Court appeal against the whole life tariff which was imposed on her by Home Secretary David Waddington in 1990 and later confirmed by Waddington’s successor Michael Howard.

22 December – The government announces an independent inquiry into the BSE crisis.

Twelve people are arrested during protests by disabled people outside Downing Street.

23 December – Rover Group produces the final Rover 100 after 17 years.

24 December – Will Straw, son of Cabinet minister Jack Straw, is arrested on suspicion of supplying cannabis.

27 December – Ulster Loyalist leader Billy Wright is shot dead in the Maze Prison. Prisoners of the Irish National Liberation Army are believed to have been responsible for Wright’s murder.

31 December – Singer Elton John and football legend Tom Finney among the men receiving knighthoods in the New Year’s Honours List.

Clyde Auditorium in Glasgow (the "armadillo"), designed by Foster and Partners, is completed.

The Weare prison ship is berthed in Portland Harbour as a temporary overflow facility.

Television

30 March – Channel 5, Britain’s fifth terrestrial television channel and its first new one since the launch of Channel 4 in November 1982, is launched.

30 March – Channel 5, the UK’s fifth and last terrestrial channel, launches at 6.00 pm. The first faces seen are the Spice Girls, who perform "1-2-3-4-5", a rewritten version of the Manfred Mann song "5-4-3-2-1". The opening night’s highlights include the launch of a new daily soap, Family Affairs, and The Jack Docherty Show, a weeknight chat show based on the format of US shows such as The Late Show with David Letterman.

1 April – At 4:40 am, Channel 5 begins a rerun of the Australian soap Prisoner: Cell Block H. This is the series’ first networked screening in the UK as, during its earlier run on ITV, scheduling of the programme had varied from region to region.

31 May – Channel 5 airs its first international football coverage, a match between England and Poland. The channel experiments with a new presenting format which attempts to recreate the atmosphere of a bar, with presenters providing coverage against the backdrop of chatter from an invited audience. The format draws criticism, with The Independent‍ ’​s Glenn Moore describing it as a "shambles" However, the coverage gives the channel its largest audience so far, with a viewership of five million.

6 January – Channel 4 closes down for the last time after more than 14 years. From 6 am, the channel broadcasts 24 hours a day.

Konnie Huq presents her first episode of the UK children’s programme Blue Peter. She will go on to be the longest running female presenter and third longest overall in the show’s history, presenting for ten years before leaving in January 2008.

BBC1

20 February – Chalk (1997)
31 March – Teletubbies (1997–2001)
7 April – 50/50 (1997–2005)
10 May – Jonathan Creek (1997–2004, 2009–2010)

BBC2

19 September – Ground Force (1997–2005)
3 November – I’m Alan Partridge (1997–2002)
December – Robot Wars (1997–2004)

BBC News 24

HARDtalk (1997–Present)

ITV

Power Rangers Turbo (1997)
Power Rangers In Space (1997–1998)
23 March – Midsomer Murders (1997–present)
6 April – Where the Heart Is (1997–2006)
12 August – Cadfael The Rose Rent (1997 Season 3 Episode 1)
19 August – Cadfael Saint Peter’s Fair (1997)
26 August – Cadfael The Raven in the Foregate (1997)
5 September – Kipper the Dog (1997–2000)
8 September – Noah’s Ark (1997–1998)
19 October – Trial & Retribution (1997–2009)

Channel 4

29 January – Brass Eye (1997–2001)

S4C

Y Clwb Rygbi (1997–present).

Channel 5

30 March – Family Affairs (1997–2005)
The Jack Docherty Show (1997–1999)
31 March – 100% (1997–2001)
Whittle (1997–1998)
5 April – Night Fever (1997–2002)

Disney Channel UK

1 September – Studio Disney UK (1997–2005)

Sky One

14 October – Dream Team (1997–2007)

Cartoon Network

14 July – Johnny Bravo (1997–2004)
15 July – Cow and Chicken (1997–1999)
I Am Weasel (1997–2000)

New channels

3 February – Trouble
30 March – Channel 5
1 September – National Geographic Channel
1 November – UK Arena
UK Horizons
UK Style
9 November – BBC News 24

Popular Films

Titanic
The Lost World: Jurassic Park
Men in Black
Tomorrow Never Dies
Air Force One
As Good as It Gets
Liar Liar
My Best Friend’s Wedding
The Fifth Element
The Full Monty
Batman & Robin
The Rainmaker

Music

By far the biggest-selling single of the year, came from Elton John. In August, Diana, Princess of Wales, was killed in a car crash. At her funeral, John played a rewritten version of "Candle in the Wind" known as "Candle in the Wind 1997", a song originally written about Marilyn Monroe (made #11 in 1974, with a live version reaching #5 in 1988). When released this year, it quickly overtook 1984’s "Do They Know It’s Christmas?" to become the biggest selling UK single ever, selling 4.86 million copies, and the biggest selling in the world, selling 37 million. It continues to hold the record to this day.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8gO0Z818j4

Charts Number-one singles

"2 Become 1" – Spice Girls
"Professional Widow" – Tori Amos
"Your Woman" – White Town
"Beetlebum" – Blur
"Ain’t Nobody" – LL Cool J
"Discothèque" – U2
"Don’t Speak" – No Doubt
"Mama" / "Who Do You Think You Are" – Spice Girls
"Block Rockin’ Beats" – The Chemical Brothers
"I Believe I Can Fly" – R. Kelly
"Blood on the Dance Floor" – Michael Jackson
"Love Won’t Wait" – Gary Barlow
"You’re Not Alone" – Olive
"I Wanna Be the Only One" – Eternal featuring Bebe Winans
"MMMBop" – Hanson
"I’ll Be Missing You" – Puff Daddy and Faith Evans
"D’You Know What I Mean?" – Oasis
"Men In Black" – Will Smith
"The Drugs Don’t Work" – The Verve
"Candle in the Wind 1997 / Something About the Way You Look Tonight" – Elton John
"Spice Up Your Life" – Spice Girls
"Barbie Girl" – Aqua
"Perfect Day" – Various Artists
"Teletubbies say "Eh-oh!" – Teletubbies
"Too Much" – Spice Girls

Nice Resume photos

A few nice Resume images I found:

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

Airport hotel could break ground in early 2016

Airport hotel could break ground in early 2016
The development — that would include an up to 300-room hotel, travel plaza and 30,000 square feet of class-A office space — would boost an effort to spur more commercial real estate development around the more than 4,700-acre Hartsfield-Jackson …
Read more on Atlanta Business Chronicle

WardsAuto Flashback – July 2015
Responding to the possible U.S. entanglement in wars raging abroad, a new federal law permits President Roosevelt to extend the 40-hour workweek in the event longer hours are needed to meet defense requirements. In signing the legislation, the …
Read more on Ward’s Auto

Nice Resume photos

Some cool Resume images:

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

Cool Off Campus Accommodation images

Some cool Off Campus Accommodation images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Profile view of the SR-71 Blackbird, F-4 Corsair, Peashooter, among others
Off Campus Accommodation
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing P-26A Peashooter :

The Boeing P-26A of the mid-to-late 1930s introduced the concept of the high-performance, all-metal monoplane fighter design, which would become standard during World War II. A radical departure from wood-and-fabric biplanes, the Peashooter nonetheless retained an open cockpit, fixed landing gear, and external wing bracing.

Most P-26As stationed overseas were eventually sold to the Philippines or assigned to the Panama Canal Department Air Force, a branch of the U.S. Army Air Corps. Several went to China and one to Spain. This one was based at Selfridge Field in Michigan and Fairfield Air Depot in Ohio between its acceptance by the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1934 and its transfer to the Canal Zone in 1938. It was given to Guatemala in 1942 and flew in the Guatemalan air force until 1954. Guatemala donated it to the Smithsonian in 1957.

Gift of the Guatemalan Air Force, Republic of Guatemala

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.

Date:
1934

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 8.5 m (27 ft 11 in)
Length:7.3 m (23 ft 11 in)
Height:3.1 m (10 ft 2 in)
Weight, empty:996 kg (2,196 lb)
Weight, gross:1,334 kg (2,935 lb)
Top speed:377 km/h (234 mph)
Engine:Pratt & Whitney R-1340-27, 600 hp
Armament:two .30 cal. M2 Browning aircraft machine guns

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vought F4U-1D Corsair :

By V-J Day, September 2, 1945, Corsair pilots had amassed an 11:1 kill ratio against enemy aircraft. The aircraft’s distinctive inverted gull-wing design allowed ground clearance for the huge, three-bladed Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller, which spanned more than 4 meters (13 feet). The Pratt and Whitney R-2800 radial engine and Hydromatic propeller was the largest and one of the most powerful engine-propeller combinations ever flown on a fighter aircraft.

Charles Lindbergh flew bombing missions in a Corsair with Marine Air Group 31 against Japanese strongholds in the Pacific in 1944. This airplane is painted in the colors and markings of the Corsair Sun Setter, a Marine close-support fighter assigned to the USS Essex in July 1944.

Transferred from the United States Navy.

Manufacturer:
Vought Aircraft Company

Date:
1940

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 460 x 1020cm, 4037kg, 1250cm (15ft 1 1/8in. x 33ft 5 9/16in., 8900lb., 41ft 1/8in.)

Materials:
All metal with fabric-covered wings behind the main spar.

Physical Description:
R-2800 radial air-cooled engine with 1,850 horsepower, turned a three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller with solid aluminum blades spanning 13 feet 1 inch; wing bent gull-shaped on both sides of the fuselage.

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: main hall panorama (SR-71, Space Shuttle, et al)
Off Campus Accommodation
Image by Chris Devers
See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 57 ft. tall x 122 ft. long x 78 ft. wing span, 150,000 lb.
(1737.36 x 3718.57 x 2377.44cm, 68039.6kg)

Materials:
Aluminum airframe and body with some fiberglass features; payload bay doors are graphite epoxy composite; thermal tiles are simulated (polyurethane foam) except for test samples of actual tiles and thermal blankets.

The first Space Shuttle orbiter, "Enterprise," is a full-scale test vehicle used for flights in the atmosphere and tests on the ground; it is not equipped for spaceflight. Although the airframe and flight control elements are like those of the Shuttles flown in space, this vehicle has no propulsion system and only simulated thermal tiles because these features were not needed for atmospheric and ground tests. "Enterprise" was rolled out at Rockwell International’s assembly facility in Palmdale, California, in 1976. In 1977, it entered service for a nine-month-long approach-and-landing test flight program. Thereafter it was used for vibration tests and fit checks at NASA centers, and it also appeared in the 1983 Paris Air Show and the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans. In 1985, NASA transferred "Enterprise" to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Transferred from National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Nice Resume photos

A few nice Resume images I found:

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

BarCamp Recruit SoCal 2009
Resume
Image by Morgantis
BarCamp Recruit Southern California 2009. Photos by Morgan Brown for www.resumedonkey.com. Feel free to reuse with attribution.

The growth of student accommodation as an asset class in Australia

The growth of student accommodation as an asset class in Australia
Specialist private operators are entering the market to offer purpose-built student accommodation, providing an alternative to on-campus accommodation but with the same management control and all-inclusive set-up as compared with students finding …
Read more on Lexology (registration)

21st century University of Wales Trinity Saint David campus set to touch down
The main changes will see revised building layouts and access, a second tall building at the southern tip of the peninsula and the omission of student accommodation in the East End in favour of private homes. … we are providing an experience for …
Read more on South Wales Evening Post

Finding a Place to Sleep—a Challenge for Moroccan Students
“Usually accommodation is far from the university campus, and quite expensive, so I keep moving from one place to another hoping I might get psychological stability, especially before the exams.” Abdel Raheem is lucky compared to Rokaya, 22, who is …
Read more on Al-Fanar Media

Collen Construction – Building on a Legacy
“When the market was turning, Collen managed to secure a €50 million social housing project for NABCO to deliver 250 houses in Tyrellstown, Dublin 15. That was fortunate as it kept our team …. Doors had to be upgraded, so again they were taken off …
Read more on Irish Building Magazine

Nice Resume Writing photos

Some cool Resume writing images:

Image from page 206 of “The Roman Capitol in ancient and modern times” (1906)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: romancapitolinan00rodo
Title: The Roman Capitol in ancient and modern times
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Rodocanachi, Emmanuel Pierre, 1859-1934. [from old catalog] Lawton, Frederick, [from old catalog] tr
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, E. P. Dutton & company [London printed]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
, c sette del Po. Ro. recaynatein oro. . ., inesse net parato di daniasco nclla stanza di Caiupidoglio doTC si inangiadinverno. 8 ; Sc. 300 adAnnibalePiuzzelli in conto a MaestiO Ainbrogio Paganoar^cntiereal Pellegrinoper quando gli consegnerd ipiatti dargento che gli abbiai7io ordinatinuovi, e quelli vecchi restaurati. Dal Caiupidoglio 6 Agosto 1616. Ibid., Cred. VI.vol. 61, fol. 275: ^^ Sc. QO ad A inbrogio Pagano ai^gentiere al Pellegrino in contodei piatti di argento fatti per il Caiupidoglio. 28th Sept., 1616, foW 278, THE PALACES 185 The architect, at that date employed by the Roman people, wasGiovanni Antonio de Pomis, of Como.^ Under the pontificate of Urban VIII. (1623-1644) the insidedecoration of the Senatorial palace was proceeded with.^ His successor. Innocent X., signalised his advent to powerby ordering the works of the third palace to be resumed ; but,as he refused to help with the expenses incurred, the CommunalCouncil were reduced to suppress most of the small posts

Text Appearing After Image:
FIG. 39.—ENGRAVING TAKEN FROM THE WORK OF MARLIANUS. created during the preceding half-century ; to wit, those of theguardians of the statues and antique objects, of the bell-ringersand trumpeters, not to mention those of several importantmagistracies, that oiv^ pacieri^ of the syndics, of the reformersof studies, in short, as the chronicler says, nearly all thequarterly and even the annual posts. Alone, the Conservatorsand the caporio7ii continued in receipt of their salaries.^ The 1 He superintended the expenses incurred for the installation of the conclave of1605. Bertolotti, Artisti Lonibardi^ II. 6. It will be remembered that there wasan exchange of land, in connection with this, between the Roman people and theCaffarelli family. 2 Forcella, I. n, ii8. •^ Ncl 1641, il papn {fnnocento X) ordino, eke in Cauipidoglio incontro alpalaz9.o dei Consovatori si facesse tin portico, del quale ernno gia da ten pezzofattili fo7idainenti; 7na per fare tale edificio non gli assegno pure

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 211 of “Serpentine” (1922)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: serpentine1922west
Title: Serpentine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: West Chester, Pa. : Published by Senior Class of the West Chester State Normal School, 1911-
Subjects:
Publisher: West Chester, Pa. : Published by Senior Class of the West Chester State Normal School, 1911-
Contributing Library: West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Library Services
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:

Text Appearing After Image:
April 1—Annual Alumni Banquet held at the Belleue-Stratford Hotel. Quite some affair!Aryan meeting in charge of Juniors. 2—How does the Normal banquet (?) taste after the B-S fare, Seniors? Kind ohardto come back to earth, nest ce pas? 3—Nothing except daily grind resumed. 4—Dr. Lewis demonstration in the Gym. Titian Tints have a feed in the D. of W.ssitting room. Would that my locks were red, lament of many. 5—Farewell dance in the Gym. Parting was such sweet sorrow for some. 6—Last day of Dr. Danns visit. After warbling our darndest, he never said a word,complimentary or otherwise. Were we disappointed? Foolish question No. 999,999,999. 7—Good-bye Normal! Once again everyone needs be hustled and bustled about in beingtransported homeward. Frequent admonitions.—Enjoy yourself. 17—Return of the prodigals. But oh, what a change. Theres a season, Easter. 18—Dr. Smith explained Dr. Danns refusal to speak to us before his departure, and alsoextended Dr. Danns heartiest

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 34 of “Gynecology :” (1918)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: gynecologygrav
Title: Gynecology :
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Graves, William Phillips, 1870-1933
Subjects: Gynecology Genital Diseases, Female Women Gynecology
Publisher: Philadelphia : Saunders
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ower left-hand corner. The epithelial cells are swollen, the nucleilarge and nearly filling the cells. The stroma cells are swollen and lie far apart, due to edema. Adilated blood-vessel is seen in the upper right corner. A few round cells are scattered through thetissue. With the cessation of the bleeding begins a regeneration of the mucosa.The secretion becomes clearer and finally disappears. The mucosa returns toits previous thickness of 2 or 3 mm. The blood-vessels shrink to their normalsize, and the extravasated blood in the stroma gradually becomes absorbed,leaving for a time small brownish pigmented spots. The broken surface epi- PHYSIOLOGY OF THE UTERUS AND OVARIES 29 thelial layer becomes regenerated by the growth of new cells. The hyper-trophied glands, which during the premenstrual stage became lengthened,spiral-shaped, and distended with secretion, discharge their contents duringthe period of menstrual flow and then resume their original small narrow form £&&&

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 5.—Menstruating Endometrium.Low power. At the top the surface epithelium is gone on the left. The glands throughouthave discharged their contents and collapsed. The epithelial cells are still swollen. The stroma isvery edematous and infiltrated with blood, especially on the left. At the bottom the glands are stillsomewhat dilated, but there is very.little edema of the stroma. and straight direction. When the bleeding has ceased, the edema of the stromadisappears and the pale swollen stroma cells regain their former appearance.The postmenstrual regenerative stage lasts about fourteen days, when therhythmical changes in the mucosa begin anew. If no menstruation takes place, or, in other words, if conception has 30 GYNECOLOGY occurred, the premenstrual mucosa maintains its character and merges into atrue decidua. It has been shown that during the cyclical change there is an increasingglycogen production from the mucosa, which reaches its height during themenstrual flow, after whic

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Nice Tenants Rights photos

A few nice Tenants Rights images I found:

Seated man writes in a book while another man waits
Tenants Rights
Image by Kheel Center, Cornell University
Title: Man seated at a table covered with publications writes, perhaps on a union card, while another man waits

Date: 1937

Photographer: Louise Boyle

Photo ID: 5859pb2f26yc800g

Collection: Louise Boyle. Southern Tenant Farmers Union Photographs, 1937 and 1982

Repository: The Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives in the ILR School at Cornell University is the Catherwood Library unit that collects, preserves, and makes accessible special collections documenting the history of the workplace and labor relations. www.ilr.cornell.edu/library/kheel

Notes:

Copyright: The copyright status of this image is unknown. It may also be subject to third party rights of privacy or publicity. Images are being made available for purposes of private study, scholarship, and research. The Kheel Center would like to learn more about this image and hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified so that we may make the necessary corrections.

Tags: Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives,Cornell University Library,Men, African Americans, Louise Boyle. Southern Tenant Farmers Union Photographs, 1937 and 1982, Farm Workers

Côte du Bain
Tenants Rights
Image by Alan Stanton
Zena gave our granddaughter three yachts.
Though not on the Côte d’Azur.

"Members of the European Action Coalition for the
 Right to Housing and the City, from thirteen different
 countries, took turns to accuse local councils of evicting
 tenants, replacing social housing units with luxury flats
 and reneging on promised affordable quotas."

"The boroughs might be proud that they’re not here
 at the public’s expense," said Freeland, "but that’s
 precisely the problem. They’re in the pockets of the
 investors, and they’ve come here to sell off our city."

— Jake Freeland, of London’s Radical Housing Network, quoted by The Guardian.

________________________________

§ The Guardian’s headline was Anger at Cannes property fair where councils rub shoulders with oligarchs.
§ YouTube video by The European Action Coalition for the Right to Housing and the City about international protests against the huge speculation prepared in the biggest real estate fair of investors and large landowners in Cannes.
§ Demands for probe into £16,000 networking event attended by Haringey Council on luxury Cannes yacht.
§ Is Tottenham Being Sold in Cannes? Discussion on local community website.
§ Tottenham Community activist Martin Ball’s Freedom of Information Request about the details; purpose, cost, and strategic outcome of Haringey Council being at the Cannes property show MIPIM. Martin asked which individuals or organisations provided £13,000 of sponsorship towards the cost.
§ The Daily Mail reported that 68 UK local Councils and Quangos took part in a "jolly in Cannes with sun, sea and booze as they talk property deals on Riviera".
§ On 13 March 2014 the Morning Star Online website reported that Council execs flog our flats at Cannes expo.
§ Enfield Advertiser reported that Enfield Council "bosses have rebuffed accusations they are in the pockets of developers after a cabinet member and a property chief shared the stage at a conference in the south of France.

rentstrike_june2013_DSC_0028
Tenants Rights
Image by Michael Fleshman
Tenants on rent strike over filthy and hazardous conditions in three buildings in the largely Latino Sunset Park section of Brooklyn held a press conference on June 3 to denounce the slow progress of repairs by mortgage holder SERYL corporation. After ignoring tenants for years, city housing officials and local politicians turned out in force to support tenants demands. (Its an election year!) Tenants Association President Sarah Lopez speaks to reporters.