Archive for September 2015

Nice Resume photos

Some cool Resume images:

My Lucky Charm – Happy St. Patrick’s Day 2010
Resume
Image by Vox Efx
Model Mayhem ~ Photography/Travel Blog ~ Flickr ~ Twitter

Curriculum Vitae Feb 2012
Resume
Image by fenrique

Tenants Rights And Landlord Responsibilities

If you are renting your home then as a tenant you have several rights and responsibilities that you should be aware of. Your landlord will also have certain responsibilities that they need to fulfill.

Tenants have the right to privacy, which means your landlord will have to give you at least 24 hours notice before they can enter your property. If no notice is given you will have the right to refuse them entry. There are many other things a landlord must also not do, such as; lock you out of your property, interfere with your utility supplies and any of your possessions, remove windows or doors, refuse your friends and family access to the property or use any kind of threatening behaviour against you.

According to the law your landlord must make sure that the property is in a decent liveable condition. Landlords are responsible for maintaining that the basic structure of the property is safe, that any sanitary fittings such as sinks and toilets are in good working order, the hot water and heating system systems work and are safe, and that any damage caused by repair jobs are fixed. If your landlord’s repairs are not up to standard, you will have the right to take matters to court to seek proper repairs. Landlords should provide you with a gas safety certificate at the start of your tenancy that will confirm that the gas appliances in your property are safe. Landlords should obtain a new safety certificate every year. They must also carry out safety checks on any electrical equipment in the property.

As a tenant you have the right to have your deposit returned to you at the end of the contract, minus any costs for repairs that have been made during your tenancy. If your tenancy was an assured shorthold tenancy agreement then your landlord would need to put your deposit in a government approved deposit protection scheme.

If you are having difficulties with your landlord it may be possible to get help and advice from your local housing officer. Housing officers can assist you when your landlord seriously neglects any of their responsibilities. This would include if you are being harassed or illegally evicted from your property. Eviction law is a very serious subject and if your landlord does not follow the correct procedures, you will have the right take legal action against them. The housing officer will able to help you if your landlord fails to supply you with rent books or refuses to give you information about fees and insurance for long term tenants. They will also be able to assist you if the utilities get cut off and you are living with an elderly person or a child.

It is important to be fully aware of your rights as a tenant and ensure that you are treated fairly and correctly by your landlord.

I am a legal writer covering advice on topics of law including tenant law, for further text and similar works visit tenants rights and landlord responsibilities or contact a solicitor today.

For more legal advice and information, and for free legal resources visit lawontheweb.co.uk.

Image from page 136 of “A history of the Bank of New York, 1784-1884” (1884)

Some cool Resume writing images:

Image from page 136 of “A history of the Bank of New York, 1784-1884” (1884)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: historyofbankofn00dome
Title: A history of the Bank of New York, 1784-1884
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Domett, Henry Williams
Subjects: Bank of New York Banks and banking
Publisher: New York : G. P. Putman’s sons
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
they certi-fied checks as being due the depositor. This actioncreated distrust and made depositors more anxious toreceive gold for their checks. A crowd filled the banking-room of the Bank ofNew York, and as it became evident that gold wasbeing drawn on checks which should properly havegone through the Clearing-House, it was decided, atabout 2 P.M., to refuse payment of any checks or billsnot presented by a dealer in the bank. On the 13th of October, during the run on thebanks a person presented two one-hundred-dollar notesof the bank to the paying teller and demanded thespecie, which was refused. Application was immediately made by the holder ofthe notes to the Supreme Court for an order to showcause why an injunction should not be granted againstthe bank and a receiver appointed. The case was argued before Judge Roosevelt, whodecided against the application on the ground thatwhile a bank may refuse to redeem its circulating notesduring a period of general suspension, that refusal of

Text Appearing After Image:
THE BANK OF NEW YORK. 93 itself does not prove that the bank is insolvent ; thebank having at the time property not only sufficientbut in every respect more than sufficient to satisfy alldemands. Within the meaning of the statute, there-fore, it is clearly solvent. The suspension was of short duration. On the 13thof November the board of directors of the Bank ofNew York passed a resolution to the effect that thebank was ready for a general resumption of speciepayments, and only awaited the action of the banks ofthe city and the State to carry the measure into effect.They further resolved to resume specie payments forall small notes of the bank then in circulation. Onthe nth of December the President signed an agree-ment with the other banks of the city to resume speciepayments for all their obligations on the followingMonday. Specie payments were accordingly resumedon the 14th of December, iSS;. The need of better accommodation for the businessof the bank had long been felt, and in i8

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

It’s nice to be home. I had a wonderful time with @meg_ and now we resume the regularly scheduled hustle.
Resume writing
Image by koka_sexton
on Instagram instagram.com/p/3iHV0PJeMM/

Off-campus Accommodation

Off-campus Accommodation

When you are studying in Australia, you will most likely be renting or sharing. Watch this helpful video about off-campus accommodation in Brisbane.
Video Rating: / 5

Part 4 of of the off-campus accommodation video series, this video looks at signing a lease (Residential Tenancy Agreement) and paying a bond.

Be sure to check out all six videos in the series.

5 Things to Consider Before Signing an Exclusive Art Licensing Agreement

Recently an artist asked me the following question about art licensing contracts: “Would you ever sign an exclusive with a company (not for an image but as an artist) and if so, under what circumstances?”

I often preface my answers with two very important points – first, that my answers are my opinion and second, every person needs to weigh their own situation when making any of these decisions.

Being an artist and not an engineer comes with it’s pros and cons. In engineering there are usually ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ ways to do things. Math and much of science can be pretty cut and dry. (If you remember math classes you will recall that!) But art and business are more fluid… the con to that is that I can’t say, “This is the answer. Absolutely. All the time.” There is always the “it depends” factor.

So, here is my answer: Yes.

I have a few contracts that are exclusive with a company for a particular industry. Here is why and here is how I made the decisions. Certain companies will ask you for an exclusive for their industry. 

Here are a few things to ask and consider when deciding if you want to agree to it or not.

Make sure you ask why they want the exclusive. They will have their reasons but you want to make sure you know them, understand them and agree with them. Certain industries are very competitive (ok, all of them are but some more ‘name’ driven than others) and the players in those industries want to have some benefit for helping build your brand and get your products in the market place. It won’t work for their business strategy to have you do art prints with them then do more with another company.
Understand what they are willing to give for locking you in for an entire industry. If you are going to commit to one company for an industry, what’s in it for you? Will they guarantee a certain amount of sales per year (hard to come by at the moment), guarantee that they will bring out a certain number of products, promote you and your brand in specific ways… you want something in return for cutting off other opportunities for a few years.
Have an “out clause” in the contract if they don’t do anything with your art. The worst case would be you sign and exclusive, they file you away and don’t do anything with your art. You sit there, growing cob-webs, unable to work with anyone else but not really getting anything going with your exclusive company either. So try to put something in the contract that says if they don’t sell, produce, have available for sale (or something to that effect) by a certain date, you have the option to terminate the contract early. Or, if the royalties are under and certain $ amount in a certain time period, you again have the option to terminate.
Do your research on the company. It is one thing to license one design or collection with a company to see how it goes. It’s like going on a blind date – you see what happens. But it is quite another to tie your wagon to a company for 2-3 years. If you don’t do your research and make sure they are a good company and believe they will do well with your art, that’s like heading to the alter without ever meeting the bride or groom… something we Americans just don’t do! Do your research – talk to artists that work with the company already.  Do they pay their royalties on time?  Are they good to work with? etc.
Finally, listen to your gut. Making decisions like this are stressful – you are closing one door in the hopes that the exclusive relationship is mutually beneficial. In the end, you can’t know 100% so trust your gut. If you think the reward potential outweighs the risks, go for it!

All this said, one of my worst contracts ever was an exclusive and some of my best are exclusives. That is where I have built the best working relationships – where it is a true partnership and I don’t feel like I’m starting over to compete for every last deal. Being able to really get to know your client and what they need makes this job more fun and fulfilling.  And it can make your income more stable which is never a bad thing either!

Get a jump start on licensing your art by claiming the first chapter of the eBook “How to Get Started in Art Licensing” FOR FREE when you visit http://www.artlicensinginfo.com/freebie.html

Similarity (Fernando Pessoa sculpture)

A few nice Resume writing images I found:

Similarity (Fernando Pessoa sculpture)
Resume writing
Image by pedrosimoes7
Chiado, Lisboa, Portugal

Statue sculptured by Lagoa Henriques

In Wikipedia

Fernando António Nogueira Pessoa (Lisboa, 13 de Junho de 1888 — Lisboa, 30 de Novembro de 1935), mais conhecido como Fernando Pessoa, foi um poeta, filósofo e escritor português.

O crítico literário Harold Bloom considerou Pessoa como ‘Whitman renascido’ em seu livro The Western Canon4 Nascido no mesmo ano em que T.S. Eliot, Fernando Pessoa é o poeta português mais universal e foi incluído por Harold Bloom em seu cânone entre os 26 melhores escritores da civilização ocidental,5 não apenas da literatura portuguesa mas também da inglesa; por ter sido educado na África do Sul em uma escola católica irlandesa, Pessoa chegou a ter mais familiaridade com o idioma inglês do que com o português ao escrever seus primeiros poemas nesse idioma.

Das quatro obras que publicou em vida, três são na língua inglesa. Fernando Pessoa traduziu várias obras inglesas para português e obras portuguesas (nomeadamente de António Botto e Almada Negreiros) para inglês e Shakespeare e Edgar Poe para o português.

Como poeta, escreveu sob múltiplas personalidades conhecidas como heterónimos, objeto da maior parte dos estudos sobre sua vida e sua obra. Robert Hass diz: "outros modernistas como Yeats, Pound, Elliot inventaram máscaras pelas quais falavam ocasionalmente(…)
Pessoa inventava poetas inteiros.

Biografia

Se depois de eu morrer, quiserem escrever a minha biografia,
Não há nada mais simples.
Tem só duas datas – a da minha nascença e a da minha morte.
Entre uma e outra todos os dias são meus. >>>
Fernando Pessoa/Alberto Caeiro; Poemas Inconjuntos; escrito entre 1913-15; publicado em Atena nº 5 de Fevereiro de 1925.

Primeiros anos em Lisboa[editar]

Fernando Pessoa nasceu neste edifício, no bairro do Chiado, frente à ópera de Lisboa, a 13 de junho de 1888.

Às três horas e vinte e quatro minutos da tarde de 13 de Junho de 1888 nasce em Lisboa Fernando Pessoa. O parto ocorreu no quarto andar direito do n.º 4 do Largo de São Carlos, em frente à ópera de Lisboa (Teatro de São Carlos). De famílias da pequena aristocracia, pelos lados paterno e materno, o pai, Joaquim de Seabra Pessoa (38), natural de Lisboa, era funcionário público do Ministério da Justiça e crítico musical do «Diário de Notícias». A mãe, D. Maria Magdalena Pinheiro Nogueira Pessoa (26), era natural dos Açores (mais propriamente, da Ilha Terceira). Viviam com eles a avó Dionísia, doente mental, e duas criadas velhas, Joana e Emília.

O poeta, pelo lado paterno, tem as suas raízes familiares no concelho de Arouca, nas freguesias do denominado «Fundo do Concelho» de Arouca.9 10 11 .

Fernando António foi baptizado em 21 de Julho na Basílica dos Mártires, ao Chiado, tendo por padrinhos a Tia Anica (D. Ana Luísa Pinheiro Nogueira, tia materna) e o General Chaby. A escolha do nome homenageia Santo António: a família reclamava uma ligação genealógica com Fernando de Bulhões, nome de baptismo de Santo António, tradicionalmente festejado em Lisboa a 13 de Junho, dia em que Fernando Pessoa nasceu.

As suas infância e adolescência foram marcadas por factos que o influenciariam posteriormente. Às cinco horas da manhã de 24 de Julho de 1893, o pai morreu, com 43 anos, vítima de tuberculose. A morte foi anunciada no Diário de Notícias do dia. Fernando tinha apenas cinco anos. O irmão Jorge viria a falecer no ano seguinte, sem completar um ano.3 A mãe vê-se obrigada a leiloar parte da mobília e muda-se para uma casa mais modesta, o terceiro andar do n.º 104 da Rua de São Marçal. Foi também neste período que surgiu o primeiro heterónimo de Fernando Pessoa, Chevalier de Pas, facto relatado pelo próprio a Adolfo Casais Monteiro, numa carta de 1935, em que fala extensamente sobre a origem dos heterónimos. Ainda no mesmo ano, escreve o primeiro poema, um verso curto com a infantil epígrafe de À Minha Querida Mamã. A mãe casa-se pela segunda vez em 1895 por procuração, na Igreja de São Mamede, em Lisboa, com o comandante João Miguel Rosa, cônsul de Portugal em Durban (África do Sul), que havia conhecido um ano antes. Em África, onde passa a maior parte da juventude e recebe educação inglesa, Pessoa viria a demonstrar desde cedo talento para a literatura.

Juventude em Durban

O padrasto e a mãe.
Em razão do casamento, viaja com a mãe para Durban, acompanhados por um tio-avô, Manuel Gualdino da Cunha, que voltaria para Lisboa no mês seguinte. Viajam no navio Funchal até à Madeira e depois no paquete Inglês Hawarden Castle até ao Cabo da Boa Esperança. Faz a instrução primária na escola de freiras irlandesas da West Street, onde fez a primeira comunhão, e percorre em dois anos o equivalente a quatro.
Em 1899 ingressa no Liceu de Durban, onde permanecerá durante três anos e será um dos primeiros alunos da turma. No mesmo ano, cria o pseudónimo Alexander Search, através do qual envia cartas a si mesmo. No ano de 1901, é aprovado com distinção no primeiro exame Cape School High Examination e escreve os primeiros poemas em inglês. Na mesma altura, morre sua irmã Madalena Henriqueta, de dois anos. Em 1901 parte com a família para Portugal, para um ano de férias. No navio em que viajam, o paquete König, vem o corpo da irmã. Em Lisboa, mora com a família em Pedrouços e depois na Avenida de D. Carlos I, n.º 109, 3.º Esquerdo. Na capital portuguesa, nasce João Maria, quarto filho do segundo casamento da mãe de Pessoa. Viaja com a família à Ilha Terceira, nos Açores, onde vive a família materna. Deslocam-se também a Tavira para visitar os parentes paternos. Nessa época, escreve o poema Quando ela passa.

Tendo de dividir a atenção da mãe com os filhos do casamento e com o padrasto, Pessoa isola-se, o que lhe propicia momentos de reflexão.

Tendo recebido uma educação britânica, que lhe proporcionou um profundo contacto com a língua inglesa, os seus primeiros textos e estudos foram em inglês. Mantém contacto com a literatura inglesa através de autores como Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, John Milton, Lord Byron, John Keats, Percy Shelley, Alfred Tennyson, entre outros. O Inglês teve grande destaque na sua vida, trabalhando com o idioma quando, mais tarde, se torna correspondente comercial em Lisboa, além de o utilizar em alguns dos seus textos e traduzir trabalhos de poetas ingleses, como O Corvo e Annabel Lee de Edgar Allan Poe. Com excepção de Mensagem, os únicos livros publicados em vida são os das colectâneas dos seus poemas ingleses: Antinous e 35 Sonnets e English Poems I – II e III, editados em Lisboa, em 1918 e 1921.

Fernando Pessoa aos seis anos.

Fernando Pessoa permanece em Lisboa, enquanto todos — mãe, padrasto, irmãos e criada Paciência, que viera com ele — regressam a Durban. Volta sozinho para a África no vapor Herzog. Matricula-se na Durban Commercial School, escola comercial de ensino nocturno, enquanto de dia estuda as disciplinas humanísticas para entrar na universidade. Nesse período, tenta escrever contos em inglês, alguns dos quais com o pseudónimo de David Merrick, que deixa inacabados. Em 1903, candidata-se à Universidade do Cabo da Boa Esperança. Na prova de exame de admissão, não obtém boa classificação, mas tira a melhor nota entre os 899 candidatos no ensaio de estilo inglês. Recebe por isso o Queen Victoria Memorial Prize («Prémio Rainha Vitória»).1 Um ano depois, ingressa novamente na Durban High School, onde frequenta o equivalente a um primeiro ano universitário. Aprofunda a sua cultura, lendo clássicos ingleses e latinos. Escreve poesia e prosa em inglês, surgindo os heterónimos Charles Robert Anon e H. M. F. Lecher. Nasce a sua irmã Maria Clara. Publica no jornal do liceu um ensaio crítico intitulado Macaulay. Por fim, encerra os seus bem sucedidos estudos na África do Sul com o «Intermediate Examination in Arts», na Universidade, obtendo uma boa classificação.

Volta definitiva a Portugal e início de carreira

Orpheu nº2, 1915

Deixando a família em Durban, regressa definitivamente à capital portuguesa, sozinho, em 1905. Passa a viver com a avó Dionísia e as duas tias na Rua da Bela Vista, n.º 17. A mãe e o padrasto regressam também a Lisboa, durante um período de férias de um ano em que Pessoa volta a morar com eles. Continua a produção de poemas em inglês e, em 1906, matricula-se no Curso Superior de Letras (actual Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa), que abandona sem sequer completar o primeiro ano. É nesta época que entra em contato com importantes escritores portugueses. Interessa-se pela obra de Cesário Verde e pelos sermões do Padre António Vieira.

Em Agosto de 1907, morre a sua avó Dionísia, deixando-lhe uma pequena herança, com a qual monta uma pequena tipografia, na Rua da Conceição da Glória, 38-4.º, sob o nome de «Empreza Ibis — Typographica e Editora — Officinas a Vapor», que rapidamente vai à falência. A partir de 1908, dedica-se à tradução de correspondência comercial, uma ocupação a que poderíamos dar o nome de "correspondente estrangeiro". Nessa actividade trabalha a vida toda, tendo uma modesta vida pública.

Inicia a sua atividade de ensaísta e crítico literário com o artigo «A Nova Poesia Portuguesa Sociologicamente Considerada», a que se seguiriam «Reincidindo…» e «A Nova Poesia Portuguesa no Seu Aspecto Psicológico» publicados em 1912 pela revista A Águia, órgão da Renascença Portuguesa. Frequenta a tertúlia literária que se formou em torno do seu tio adoptivo, o poeta, general aposentado Henrique Rosa, no Café A Brasileira, no Largo do Chiado em Lisboa. Mais tarde, já nos anos vinte, o seu café preferido seria o Martinho da Arcada, na Praça do Comércio, onde escrevia e se encontrava com amigos e escritores.
Em 1915 participou na revista literária Orpheu, a qual lançou o movimento modernista em Portugal, causando algum escândalo e muita controvérsia. Esta revista publicou apenas dois números, nos quais Pessoa publicou em seu nome, bem como com o heterónimo Álvaro de Campos. No segundo número da Orpheu, Pessoa assume a direcção da revista, juntamente com Mário de Sá-Carneiro.

Em Outubro de 1924, juntamente com o artista plástico Ruy Vaz, Fernando Pessoa lançou a revista Athena, na qual fixou o «drama em gente» dos seus heterónimos, publicando poesias de Ricardo Reis, Álvaro de Campos e Alberto Caeiro, bem como do ortónimo Fernando Pessoa.

Morte

Pessoa foi internado no dia 29 de Novembro de 1935, no Hospital de São Luís dos Franceses, em Lisboa, com diagnóstico de "cólica hepática" causada por cálculo biliar associado a cirrose hepática, diagnóstico que é hoje contestado por estudos médicos, embora o excessivo consumo de álcool ao longo da sua vida seja consensualmente considerado como um importante factor causal. Segundo um desses estudos, Pessoa não revelava alguns dos sintomas mais típicos de cirrose hepática, tendo provavelmente sido vítima de uma pancreatite aguda.12 Morreu no dia 30 de Novembro, com 47 anos de idade. Sua última frase foi escrita na cama do hospital, em inglês, com a data de 29 de Novembro de 1935: "I know not what tomorrow will bring" ("Não sei o que o amanhã trará").

Legado

O espólio de Pessoa: a célebre arca, contendo mais de 25000 páginas, e a «biblioteca inglesa».
Pode-se dizer que a vida do poeta foi dedicada a criar e que, de tanto criar, criou outras vidas através dos seus heterónimos, o que foi a sua principal característica e motivo de interesse pela sua pessoa, aparentemente muito pacata. Alguns críticos questionam se Pessoa realmente teria transparecido o seu verdadeiro eu ou se tudo não teria passado de um produto, entre tantos, da sua vasta criação. Ao tratar de temas subjectivos e usar a heteronímia,13 torna-se enigmático ao extremo. Este fato é o que move grande parte das buscas para estudar a sua obra. O poeta e crítico brasileiro Frederico Barbosa declara que Fernando Pessoa foi "o enigma em pessoa".Escreveu sempre, desde o primeiro poema aos sete anos, até ao leito de morte. Importava-se com a intelectualidade do homem, e pode-se dizer que a sua vida foi uma constante divulgação da língua portuguesa: nas próprias palavras do heterónimo Bernardo Soares, "a minha pátria (sic) é a língua portuguesa". O mesmo empenho é patente no seguinte poema:

Agora, tendo visto tudo e sentido tudo, tenho o dever de me fechar em casa no meu espírito e trabalhar, quanto possa e em tudo quanto possa, para o progresso da civilização e o alargamento da consciência da humanidade

Fernando Pessoa, carta a Armando Côrtes-Rodrigues de 19 de Janeiro de 1915.

Última residência do poeta, actual Casa Fernando Pessoa.
Analogamente a Pompeu, que disse que "navegar é preciso; viver não é preciso", Pessoa diz, no poema Navegar é Preciso, que "viver não é necessário; o que é necessário é criar". Outra interpretação comum deste poema diz respeito ao fato de a navegação ter resultado de uma atitude racionalista do mundo ocidental: a navegação exigiria uma precisão que a vida poderia dispensar.
O poeta mexicano Octavio Paz, laureado com o Nobel de Literatura, diz que "os poetas não têm biografia. A sua obra é a sua biografia" e que, no caso de Fernando Pessoa, "nada na sua vida é surpreendente — nada, excepto os seus poemas". Em The Western Canon, Harold Bloom incluiu-o entre os cânones ocidentais, no capítulo Borges, Neruda e Pessoa: o Whitman Hispano-Português (pg. 451, 1995).
Na comemoração do centenário do nascimento de Pessoa, em 1988, o seu corpo foi trasladado para o Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, confirmando o reconhecimento que não teve em vida.

Pessoa e o ocultismo

Fernando Pessoa interessava-se pelo ocultismo e pelo misticismo, com destaque para a Maçonaria e a Rosa-Cruz (embora não se lhe conheça qualquer filiação concreta em Loja ou Fraternidade dessas escolas de pensamento), havendo inclusive defendido publicamente as organizações iniciáticas no Diário de Lisboa (4 de Fevereiro de 1935), contra ataques por parte da ditadura do Estado Novo. O seu poema hermético mais conhecido e apreciado entre os estudantes de esoterismo intitula-se "No Túmulo de Christian Rosenkreutz". Tinha o hábito de fazer consultas astrológicas para si mesmo (de acordo com a sua certidão de nascimento, nasceu às 15h20, tinha ascendente Escorpião e o Sol em Gémeos).14 Realizou mais de mil horóscopos.

Apreciava também muito o trabalho de Helena Blavatsky tendo inclusive traduzido, em 1916, A Voz do Silêncio, assim como lhe suscitava muita curiosidade o famoso ocultista Aleister Crowley, tendo-lhe traduzido o poema Hino a Pã. Certa vez, lendo uma publicação inglesa de Crowley, encontrou erros no horóscopo e escreveu-lhe para o corrigir. Os seus conhecimentos de astrologia impressionaram Crowley e, como este gostava de viagens, foi a Portugal conhecer o poeta.15 Acompanhou-o a maga alemã Hanni Larissa Jaeger,16 . O encontro entre Pessoa e Crowley ocorreu com algum sensacionalismo, dado o Poeta Inglês ter simulado o seu suicídio na Boca do Inferno, o que atraiu várias polícias Europeias e a atenção dos média da época. Pessoa estaria dentro da encenação, tendo combinado com Crowley a notificação dos jornais e a redacção de um "romance policiário" cujos direitos reverteriam a favor dos dois poetas. Apesar de ter escrito várias dezenas de páginas, essa obra de ficção nunca foi concretizada.

Obra poética

Estátua de Fernando Pessoa da autoria de Lagoa Henriques, no café A Brasileira, no Chiado, Lisboa
O poeta é um fingidor.
Finge tão completamente
Que chega a fingir que é dor
A dor que deveras sente.>>>
Fernando Pessoa; Autopsicografia; 27 de Novembro de 1930 (1ª publ. in Presença, nº 36. Coimbra: Novembro 1932.)18
Considera-se que a grande criação estética de Pessoa foi a invenção heteronímica que atravessa toda a sua obra. Os heterónimos, diferentemente dos pseudónimos, são personalidades poéticas completas: identidades que, em princípio falsas, se tornam verdadeiras através da sua manifestação artística própria e diversa do autor original. Entre os heterónimos, o próprio Fernando Pessoa passou a ser chamado ortónimo, porquanto era a personalidade original. Entretanto, com o amadurecimento de cada uma das outras personalidades, o próprio ortónimo tornou-se apenas mais um heterónimo entre os outros. Os três heterónimos mais conhecidos (e também aqueles com maior obra poética) foram Álvaro de Campos, Ricardo Reis e Alberto Caeiro. Um quarto heterónimo de grande importância na obra de Pessoa é Bernardo Soares, autor do Livro do Desassossego, importante obra literária do século XX. Bernardo é considerado um semi-heterónimo por ter muitas semelhanças com Fernando Pessoa e não possuir uma personalidade muito característica, ao contrário dos três primeiros, que possuem até mesmo data de nascimento e morte (excepção para Ricardo Reis, que não possui data de falecimento). Por essa razão, José Saramago, laureado com o Prémio Nobel, escreveu o livro O ano da morte de Ricardo Reis.
Através dos heterónimos, Pessoa conduziu uma profunda reflexão sobre a relação entre verdade, existência e identidade. Este último fator possui grande notabilidade na famosa misteriosidade do poeta.

Com uma tal falta de gente coexistível, como há hoje, que pode um homem de sensibilidade fazer senão inventar os seus amigos, ou quando menos, os seus companheiros de espírito?

Diversos estudiosos de Pessoa procuraram enumerar seus pseudónimos, heterónimos, semi-heterónimos, personagens fictícias e poetas mediúnicos. Em 1966 a portuguesa Teresa Rita Lopes fez um primeiro levantamento, com 18 nomes. Antonio Pina Coelho, também português, elevou em seguida a relação para 21. A mesma Teresa Rita Lopes apresentou um levantamento mais detalhado em 1990, chegando a 72 nomes.20 Em 2009 o holandês Michaël Stoker chegou a 83 heterónimos. Mais recentemente, o brasileiro José Paulo Cavalcanti Filho, utilizando critério mais amplo, apresentou uma lista com 127 nomes.21
Ortónimo[editar]

Mensagem, de Fernando Pessoa, 1ª ed., 1934.

A obra ortónima de Pessoa passou por diferentes fases, mas envolve basicamente a procura de um certo patriotismo perdido, através de uma atitude sebastianista reinventada. O ortónimo foi profundamente influenciado, em vários momentos, por doutrinas religiosas (como a teosofia) e sociedades secretas (como a Maçonaria). A poesia resultante tem um certo ar mítico, heróico (quase épico, mas não na acepção original do termo) e por vezes trágico. Pessoa é um poeta universal, na medida em que nos foi dando, mesmo com contradições, uma visão simultaneamente múltipla e unitária da vida. Uma explicação para a criação dos três principais heterónimos e o semi-heterónimo Bernardo Soares, reside nas várias formas que tinha de olhar o mundo, apoiando-se no racionalismo e pensamento oriental.22
O ortónimo é considerado, só por si, como simbolista e modernista pela evanescência, indefinição e insatisfação, bem como pela inovação praticada através de diversas sendas de formulação do discurso poético (sensacionalismo, paulismo, interseccionismo, etc.).23
Fernando Pessoa foi marcado também pela poesia musical e subjectiva, voltada essencialmente para a metalinguagem e os temas relativos a Portugal, como o sebastianismo presente na principal obra de "Pessoa ele-mesmo", Mensagem, uma coletânea de poemas sobre as grandes personagens históricos portugueses. Publicado em 1934, apenas um ano antes da morte do autor, este foi o único livro de Fernando Pessoa em Língua Portuguesa editado em vida. Foi contemplado com o Prémio Antero de Quental, na categoria de «poema ou poesia solta», do Secretariado da Propaganda Nacional (SPN).2
Heterónimos e Semi-heterónimos[editar]
Álvaro de Campos[editar]
Ver artigo principal: Álvaro de Campos
TABACARIA
Não sou nada.
Nunca serei nada.
Não posso querer ser nada.
À parte isso, tenho em mim todos os sonhos do mundo.
Janelas do meu quarto,
Do meu quarto de um dos milhões do mundo que ninguém sabe quem é
(E se soubessem quem é, o que saberiam?),
Dais para o mistério de uma rua cruzada constantemente por gente,
Para uma rua inacessível a todos os pensamentos,
Real, impossivelmente real, certa, desconhecidamente certa,
Com o mistério das coisas por baixo das pedras e dos seres,
Com a morte a pôr humidade nas paredes e cabelos brancos nos homens,
Com o Destino a conduzir a carroça de tudo pela estrada de nada.
_____________________________________________________
Álvaro de Campos: "Tabacaria" (excerto)
Entre todos os heterónimos, Campos foi o único a manifestar fases poéticas diferentes ao longo da sua obra. Era um engenheiro de educação inglesa e origem portuguesa, mas sempre com a sensação de ser um estrangeiro em qualquer parte do mundo.
Começa a sua trajetória como um decadentista (influenciado pelo simbolismo), mas logo adere ao futurismo. Após uma série de desilusões com a existência, assume uma veia niilista, expressa naquele que é considerado um dos poemas mais conhecidos e influentes da língua portuguesa, Tabacaria. É revoltado e crítico e faz a apologia da velocidade e da vida moderna, com uma linguagem livre, radical.

Ricardo Reis

Ver artigo principal: Ricardo Reis
O heterónimo Ricardo Reis é descrito como um médico que se definia como latinista e monárquico. De certa maneira, simboliza a herança clássica na literatura ocidental, expressa na simetria, na harmonia e num certo bucolismo, com elementos epicuristas e estóicos. O fim inexorável de todos os seres vivos é uma constante na sua obra, clássica, depurada e disciplinada. Faz uso da mitologia não-cristã.
Segundo Pessoa, Reis mudou-se para o Brasil em protesto à proclamação da República em Portugal e não se sabe o ano da sua morte.
Em O ano da morte de Ricardo Reis, José Saramago continua, numa perspectiva pessoal, o universo deste heterónimo após a morte de Fernando Pessoa, cujo fantasma estabelece um diálogo com o seu heterónimo, sobrevivente ao criador.

Alberto Caeiro

Ver artigo principal: Alberto Caeiro
Por sua vez, Caeiro, nascido em Lisboa, teria vivido quase toda a vida como camponês, quase sem estudos formais. Teve apenas a instrução primária, mas é considerado o mestre entre os heterónimos (pelo ortónimo). Depois da morte do pai e da mãe, permaneceu em casa com uma tia-avó, vivendo de modestos rendimentos e morreu de tuberculose. Também é conhecido como o poeta-filósofo, mas rejeitava este título e pregava uma "não-filosofia". Acreditava que os seres simplesmente são, e nada mais: irritava-se com a metafísica e qualquer tipo de simbologia para a vida.

Os escritos pessoanos que versam sobre a caracterização dos heterónimos, "Pessoa-ele-mesmo", Álvaro de Campos, Ricardo Reis e o meio-heterónimo Bernardo Soares, conferem a Alberto Caeiro um papel quase místico, enquanto poeta e pensador. Reis e Soares chegam a compará-lo ao deus Pã, e Pessoa esboça-lhe um horóscopo no qual lhe atribui o signo de leão, associado ao elemento fogo. A relevância destas alusões advém da explicação de Fernando Pessoa sobre o papel de Caeiro no escopo da heteronímia. Citando a atuação dos quatro elementos da astrologia sobre a personalidade dos indivíduos, Pessoa escreve:
"Uns agem sobre os homens como o fogo, que queima nele todo o acidental, e os deixa nus e reais, próprios e verídicos, e esses são os libertadores. Caeiro é dessa raça, Caeiro teve essa força."

Dos principais heterónimos de Fernando Pessoa, Caeiro foi o único a não escrever em prosa. Alegava que somente a poesia seria capaz de dar conta da realidade.
Possuía uma linguagem estética direta, concreta e simples mas, ainda assim, bastante complexa do ponto de vista reflexivo. O seu ideário resume-se no verso Há metafísica bastante em não pensar em nada. A sua obra está agrupada na coletânea Poemas Completos de Alberto Caeiro.

Bernardo Soares

Ver artigo principal: Bernardo Soares
Bernardo Soares é, dentro da ficção de seu próprio Livro do Desassossego, um simples ajudante de guarda-livros na cidade de Lisboa. Conheceu Fernando Pessoa numa pequena casa de pasto frequentada por ambos. Foi aí que Bernardo deu a ler a Fernando seu livro, que, mesmo escrito em forma de fragmentos, é considerado uma das obras fundadoras da ficção portuguesa no século XX.24

Bernardo Soares é muitas vezes considerado um semi-heterónimo porque, como seu próprio criador explica:

"Não sendo a personalidade a minha, é, não diferente da minha, mas uma simples mutilação dela. Sou eu menos o raciocínio e afectividade."
A instância da ficção que se desenvolve no livro é insignificante, porque trata-se de uma "autobiografia sem factos", como o próprio Fernando Pessoa situa o livro. Dessa forma, o que interessa em sua prosa fragmentária é a dramaticidade das reflexões humanas que vêm à tona na insistência de uma escrita que se reconhece inviável, inútil e imperfeita, à beira do tédio, do trágico e da indiferença estética. O fato de Fernando Pessoa considerar (em cartas e anotações pessoais) Bernardo Soares um semi-heterônimo faz pensar na maior proximidade de temperamento entre Pessoa e Soares. Nesse sentido, para alguns, o jogo heteronímico ganha em complexidade e Pessoa logra o êxito da construção de si mesmo como o mais instigante mito literário português na Modernidade.

Cronologia

«Fernando Pessoa em flagrante delitro»: dedicatória na fotografia que ofereceu à namorada Ophélia Queiroz em 1929.
A seguir apresenta-se uma cronologia25 26 abreviada da vida do poeta:
1888: Fernando António Nogueira Pessoa nasce, a 13 de Junho. É batizado em Julho.
1893: Em Janeiro, nasce seu irmão Jorge. A 13 de Julho, o pai morre, de tuberculose. A família é obrigada a leiloar parte dos bens.
1894: O irmão de Fernando, Jorge, morre em Janeiro. Pessoa cria o seu primeiro heterônimo. O futuro padrasto, João Miguel Rosa, é nomeado cônsul interino em Durban, na África do Sul.
1895: Em Julho, Fernando escreve o seu primeiro poema e João Miguel Rosa parte para Durban. Em Dezembro, João Miguel Rosa casa-se com a mãe de Fernando, por procuração.
1896: Em 7 de Janeiro, é concedido o passaporte à mãe, e a família parte para Durban. A 27 de Novembro, nasce Henriqueta Madalena, irmã do poeta.
1897: Fernando faz o curso primário e a primeira comunhão em West Street.
1898: Nasce, a 22 de Outubro, sua segunda irmã, Madalena Henriqueta.
1899: Ingressa na Durban High School em Abril. Cria o pseudónimo Alexander Search.
1900: Em Janeiro, nasce o terceiro filho do casal, Luís Miguel. Em Junho, Pessoa passa para a Form III e é premiado em francês.
1901: Em Junho, é aprovado no exame da Cape School High Examination. Madalena Henriqueta falece e Fernando começa a escrever as primeiras poesias em inglês. Em Agosto, parte com a família para uma visita a Portugal.
1902: Em Janeiro, nasce, em Lisboa, seu irmão João Maria. Fernando vai à ilha Terceira em Maio. Em Junho, a família retorna a Durban. Em Setembro, Fernando volta sozinho para Durban.
1903: Submete-se ao exame de admissão à Universidade do Cabo, tirando a melhor nota no ensaio em inglês e ganhando assim o Prémio Rainha Vitória.
1904: Em Agosto, nasce sua irmã Maria Clara e em Dezembro termina os estudos na África do Sul.
1905: Parte definitivamente para Lisboa, onde passa a viver com a avó Dionísia. Continua a escrever poemas em inglês.
1906: Matricula-se, em Outubro, no Curso Superior de Letras. A mãe e o padrasto retornam a Lisboa e Pessoa volta a morar com eles. Falece, em Lisboa, a sua irmã Maria Clara.
1907: A família retorna uma vez mais a Durban. Pessoa passa a morar com a avó. Desiste do Curso Superior de Letras. Em Agosto, a avó morre. Durante um curto período, Pessoa estabelece uma tipografia.
1908: Começa a trabalhar como correspondente estrangeiro em escritórios comerciais.
1910: Escreve poesia e prosa em português, inglês e francês.
1912: Publica na revista Águia o seu primeiro artigo de crítica literária. Idealiza Ricardo Reis.
1913: Intensa produção literária. Escreve O Marinheiro.
Ficheiro:File:Pessoabaixa.jpg
Fernando Pessoa no Baixo, Portugal
1914: Cria os heterônimos Álvaro de Campos, Ricardo Reis e Alberto Caeiro. Escreve os poemas de O Guardador de Rebanhos e também o Livro do Desassossego.
1915: Sai em Março o primeiro número de Orpheu. Pessoa "mata" Alberto Caeiro.
1916: O seu amigo Mário de Sá-Carneiro suicida-se.
1918: Publica poemas em inglês, resenhados com destaque no "Times".
1920: Conhece Ofélia Queiroz. Sua mãe e seus irmãos voltam para Portugal. Em Outubro, atravessa uma grande depressão, que o leva a pensar em internar-se numa casa de saúde. Rompe com Ofélia.
1921: Funda a editora Olisipo, onde publica poemas em inglês.
1924: Aparece a revista "Atena", dirigida por Fernando Pessoa e Ruy Vaz.
1925: A 17 de Março, morre, em Lisboa, a mãe do poeta.
1926: Dirige com seu cunhado a "Revista de Comércio e Contabilidade". Requer patente de uma invenção sua.
1927: Passa a colaborar com a revista Presença.
1929: Volta a relacionar-se com Ofélia.
1931: Rompe novamente com Ofélia.
1934: Publica Mensagem.
1935: Em 29 de Novembro, é internado com o diagnóstico de cólica hepática. Morre no dia 30 do mesmo mês.

Writing a letter back home …
Resume writing
Image by Ed Yourdon
This is a continuation of a series of subway photos that I began in 2009-2010, which you can find here and here on Flickr, and which I’ve continued — on a station-by-station basis — in 2011. The photos in this set were taken in the Canal St. IRT station, on the downtown platforms, in January 2011.

********************************

Over the years, I’ve seen various photos of the NYC subway "scene," usually in a relatively grim, dark, black-and-white format. But during a spring 2009 class on street photography at the NYC International Center of Photography (ICP), I saw lots and lots of terrific subway shots taken by my fellow classmates … so I was inspired to start taking some myself.

One of the reasons I rarely, if ever, took subway photos before 2009 is that virtually every such photo I ever saw was in black-and-white. I know that some people are fanatics about B/W photography as a medium; and I respect their choice. And I took quite a lot of B/W photographs of my own in the late 60s and early 70s, especially when I had my own little makeshift darkroom for printing my own photos.

But for most of the past 40 years, I’ve focused mostly on color photography. As for photos of subways, I don’t feel any need to make the scene look darker and grimier than it already is, by restricting it to B/W. Indeed, one of the things I find quite intriguing is that there is a lot of color in this environment, and it’s not too hard to give some warmth and liveliness to the scene…

To avoid disruption, and to avoid drawing attention to myself, I’m not using flash shots; but because of the relatively low level of lighting, I’m generally using an ISO setting of 3200 or 6400, depending on which camera I’m using. As a result, some of the shots are a little grainy – but it’s a compromise that I’m willing to make.

Thus far in 2011, I’ve been using a small, compact "pocket" camera == the Canon G-12 — in contrast to the somewhat large, bulky Nikon D300 and D700 DSLRs that I used predominately in 2009 anbd 2010. If I’m photographing people on the other side of the tracks in a subway station, there’s no problem holding up the camera, composing the shot, and taking it in full view of everyone. But if I’m taking photos inside a subway car or photos of people on the same side of the platform where I’m standing, I normally set the camera lens to a wide angle (18mm or 24mm) setting, point it in the general direction of the subject(s), and shoot without framing or composing.

What I find most interesting about the scenes photographed here is how isolated most people seem to be. Of course, there are sometimes couples, or families, or groups of school-children; but by far the most common scene is an individual standing alone, waiting for a train to arrive. He or she may be reading a book, or listening to music, or (occasionally) talking to someone on a cellphone; but often they just stare into space, lost in their own thoughts. Some look happy, some look sad; but the most common expression is a blank face and a vacant stare. It’s almost as if people go into a state of suspended animation when they descend underground into the subway — and they don’t resume their normal expression, behavior, and mannerisms until they emerge back above-ground at the end of their ride.

Anyway, this is what it looks like down underground … or at least, this is what it’s like in the stations I’ve visited and photographed so far. If I feel energetic enough in 2011, maybe I’ll try to photograph people in every subway station. It would be interesting to see what kind of variety can be seen…

5 rules for Negotiating Commercial Leases

5 rules for Negotiating Commercial Leases

Basic rules to negotiating a Retail, Industrial or Commercial Lease. Covering topics and terms such as Base Rate, NNN, CAM, Personal Guaranty, Option Terms, Lease Assignment Clause, Lease Indexing, CPI. Presented by Pramod Patel, CBB of Just Elementary Inc. Commercial Business Brokers. (888) 926-9193 Peter Patel www.JustElementary.com
Video Rating: / 5

Coagula’s Mat Gleason signs a lease for a commercial gallery space on leap day.

Nice Resume Writing photos

Check out these Resume writing images:

Image from page 59 of “Animal life in field and garden” (1921)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: animallifeinfiel00fabr
Title: Animal life in field and garden
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Fabre, Jean-Henri, 1823-1915
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: New York : The Century Co.
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Text Appearing Before Image:
em up in my handkerchief so asto bring them home and let them loose in my garden.Ever since then they have never failed to render me certain services thatyou can appreciate byexamining the jaws inthis picture. Pointed teeth likethose, Jules re-marked, were never Jaws and Teeth of a Hedgehog i j? -u made tor browsinggrass. The hedgehog must feed on prey. Its teethare just right for crunching June-bug worms suchas I saw dug up in the garden this morning. Notice how sharp the points of the teeth are,resumed his uncle, both in the upper and in thelower jaw. Those two rows of teeth fit into eachother when the animal bites, and they plunge likeso many fine daggers into the captured victim^sflesh. With this complicated dental mechanism evi-dently the hedgehog cannot triturate tough food; itmust have a kind of diet that is soft, juicy, capableof being reduced to marmalade by a brief chewing.The animal is therefore preeminently a flesh-eater.Several other species, particularly the mole and the

Text Appearing After Image:
THE HEDGEHOG 51 shrew-mouse of these regions, have, like the hedge-hog, teeth tapering to conical points and interplay-ing in the two jaws. Their food, too, is about thesame as the hedgehogs. All three—hedgehog, mole,and shrew-mouse—live on small game—insects,larvae, slugs, caterpillars, worms. They belong tothe group of mammals known to naturalists as theorder of insectivorous animals, or, in other words,the order of insect-eaters. On and under the groundthey carry on the same kind of hunt that bats do inthe air. In their way of living bats, too, are insec-tivorous; but their peculiar bodily structure causesthem to be placed apart in the order of chiropters.Thus the mammals furnish us two orders of help-ers : the chiropters, which hunt on the wing, and theinsect-eaters—the insectivorous animals properlyso called—which hunt on and under the ground. Tothe latter belong the hedgehog, the mole, and theshrew-mouse. The hedgehog, the largest of the three, requiresthe largest and

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 85 of “History of the American Civil War” (1867)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: historyofamerica02drap
Title: History of the American Civil War
Year: 1867 (1860s)
Authors: Draper, John William, 1811-1882
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Slavery Slaves
Publisher: New York : Harper & Bros.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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CCS brOUght thrOUgh tary of state to him. Maryland were intended solely for the de-fense of the capital; that the national highway had beenselected, after consultation with prominent magistrates 76 THE TROOPS EEACH ANNAPOLIS, [Sect. VII. and citizens of ]Iaryland, as the one wliich, wliile a routeis absolutely necessary, is farthest removed from the pop-ulous cities of the state, and with the exj^ectation that itwould thei-efore be the least objectionable. With re-sj)ect to the suggestion of foreign mediation, he- addedthat no domestic contention whatever that might ariseamong the parties of this republic ought in any case tobe referred to any foreign arbitrament, and least of all tothe arbitrament of a Euro23ean monarchy. • General Butler, on arriving at the Susquehanna (Aj^rilThe Massachusetts 20th) with his dctachmcut of MassachusettsS^tow^swnj troops, found the bridges l)urned. Deter-mined to make his way to Washington, heseized a r team-boat at the ferry of Havre de Grace, and

Text Appearing After Image:
THE KORTHERX KAILROAUo TO WASHI^GTOX. President. carried his f(>rcc>5 to An-na})olis. The governorauain protected againstthis landino; of North-ern troops on the soil ofMaryland. They arenot Northern troops, re-plied Butler; they area part of the whole mili-tia of the United States,obeying the call of the Chap. XXXVII.] AND EELIEVE WASHINGTON. ^^ The Massachusetts troops resumed tlieir marcli fromAnnapolis on the 24th, repairing the bridges and layingrails as they went. At Annapolis Junction they reacheda train of cars from Washington, and, with the New YorkSeventh Regiment in advance, arrived in that city on the25th. From the day of the attack on the Massachusettstroops in Baltimore, Washington had been cut off fromThe public build- tlie North. The Treasury building and thetafoccupied by Capltol had bccu barricaded, and howitzerstroops. p^^^ -^^ their passages; subsequently the basement of the Capitol was turned into a bake-house,and the chambers of the Senate and Representativ

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15a – Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd (Altered Structure) – 1906 – Phillip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed) (E)

Some cool Signing a Commercial Lease images:

15a – Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd (Altered Structure) – 1906 – Phillip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed) (E)
Signing a Commercial Lease
Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

01 – Harvard Street Monument – Harvard Blvd & Washington Blvd, 1902.

Nearly destroyed by neglect and vandals over decades of inner city decay, the Harvard and Hobart Boulevard monuments were restored in 2002.

02 – Frank Southerland & Grace Pirtle Hutton, and John A Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave – 1907

According to the property permit, the house was built for E B Spencer in 1906. Most likely he built this house on speculation (as he did two years earlier at 2039-2041 La Salle Ave), because according to the LA County Tax Assessor’s Office, John A Pirtle purchased this property in 1907. The same year there appears an article in the LA Herald announcing the engagement of Frank Southerland Hutton to Miss Grace Pirtle, who lived with her parents at 1819 S Union Ave, and their plans to build a house in Los Angeles after their honeymoon. Another 1907 article indicates the happy couple were married and moved into their new home on La Salle Ave. But, by 1909, they’ve moved to 1827 S Normandie and John A Pirtle is shown at the La Salle house. John Pirtle was a Southern California industrialist who appears to have made his fortune in the oil fields of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas, through a company called the Beaumont Exchange and the Oriole Oil Company. He also speculated in water, with the West Los Angeles Water Company, West Side Water Company and the Glendale Consolidated Water Company. Frank Hutton was a well-known and respected Los Angeles lawyer, a partner of the firm Schweitzer and Hutton. This 1907 house is an unassuming looking American Craftsman bungalow, which hides its actual size. Beneath the long, low slung slope of the gable is a rather large house of 2-1/2 stories. The rounded, Colonial Revival styled balcony rail is an unusual feature.

03 – Robert K Wilson, J Frank & Virginia N Waters, and Mark & Mamie (May) E Phelps Residence – 2039-2041 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Frank Dale Hudson and Julius W Krause

Dutch Colonial in West Adams Heights is a rare architectural style, probably already deemed to be passé, but two examples exist nonetheless. The other Dutch is on South Hobart, built for C I D Moore, and is turned on its side, giving it a more Cotswold appearance. This Dutch Colonial is a straight-on interpretation of the vernacular. The architect of the house is reported to be Julius W Krause. Prior to 1895 Krause was partnered with Frank Dale Hudson, of the firm Hudson and Munsell. For a time Krause was also the Superintendent of Building for the City of Los Angeles. The original builder of this house was E B Spencer, however it’s obvious he built it in 1905 on speculation (just as he did two years later the house at 2047 La Salle Ave). This house was quickly sold the same year to Robert K Wilson who Just as quickly flipped it in 1907 to J Frank Waters. Six months later Waters sold the residence to Mark and Mamie (May) E Phelps. The Phelps’s lived at this resident until Mark’s death in 1924. Mark Phelps was described as a pioneer of Los Angeles, first finding success in mining, then as a live-stock dealer. He retired just 3 months before his death. By 1926 J E Phillips who was reported to be living at this address was arrested for smuggling Moonshine Whiskey in his car. In 1943, William J Morris, a building contractor, was the resident, according to his obituary.

04 – Wilbur Wells & Blanche Lillian Smith Keim Residence – 2033 La Salle Ave – 1904

Wilbur Wells Keim graduated from the Pharmacy School at UC Berkeley in 1902. He married Miss Blanche Lillian Smith in 1903. A large reception for the couple was held at the West Adams Heights mansion of Wesley W Beckett, 2218 S Harvard Blvd. The couple began building their house on La Salle in 1904. Keim opened a pharmacy with Edward R Neill (Keim-Neill Drug Co) just a few blocks away on the Southwest corner of Washington and Normandie, at 1890 W Washington Boulevard. Their daughter, Lorraine Keim was a 1925 graduate of USC and a member of the Kappa Alpha Sorority. The house itself is a mystery. The front porch is Craftsman. The eves under the second story and the overall shape appear to be Colonial Revival. The front door with the half sidelights and smaller window openings suggest an older structure which was moved to this location and remodeled. The effect, unfortunately, isn’t quite successful.

05 – William A & Rose H Jenkins Residence – 2029 La Salle Ave – 1909

Originally the address was 1949 La Salle Ave, but a reorganization of addresses by the city to make them more uniform changed it to 2029 La Salle Ave sometime around 1909-1910.

06 – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence – 2025 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The Vickery’s lived at 341 Andrews Blvd (S St Andrews Pl), in a 1907 mansion they built for ,000. According to the LA Times and LA Herald society pages, they entertained often. In May, 1910, the Vickery’s sold their St Andrews Pl home through the Althouse Brothers for ,000, to Mrs. Frederick Fischer, and relocated to their 2025 La Salle Ave home. After Frank Vickery’s death, auction, either the house didn’t sell at auction or his wide decided to continue living at the residence. The 1923-24 Southwestern Blue Book lists her at this location, with visiting on “Third Wednesdays. “ Mrs. Vickery was also a member of the Ebell and Friday Morning Clubs. Although this house must have been smaller and less opulent than their St Andrews Place residence, it is still a handsome American Craftsman home, with only minor alterations.

07 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 2017 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is American Craftsman, and the architect and builder was the Alfred E Georgian, Co.

08 – La Salle Ave Streetscape
Looking South on La Salle Ave (from left to right):
A. 2047 La Salle Ave – Hutton-Pirtle Residence
B. 2041 La Salle Ave – Phelps Residence
C. 2029 La Salle Ave – Hull Residence
D. 2033 La Salle Ave – Keim Residence
E. 2025 La Salle Ave – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence
F. 2017 La Salle Ave – Income Property owned by Frank A Vickery

09 – Stanley Frederick & Sue A Shaffer McClung – 1959 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Robert Farquhar Train & Robert Edmund Williams

Imagine this house as it might have been in 1905: the long sloping roof of natural shingles, which would have matched the color of the shingled siding; ornate rails along the porch, widows weep, and above the bay window; a full chimney and no bars on the windows or doors. The effect would have been striking, and will again when the house is one day restored. It’s one of the most significant surviving houses on La Salle. It was designed by the architecture team of Robert Farquar Train and Robert Edmund Williams (Train & Williams), for Pacific Mutual Secretary Stanley F McClung. He was part of the “Old Company” forced out of power in the early 1930’s along with his brother-in-law George Ira Cochran.

10 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 1947 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is a handsome American Craftsman residence, making use of horizontal siding to make it appear wider.

11 – Evan G & Matilee Loeb Evans and William A & Rose H Haley Jenkins Residence – 1929 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

This home is American Craftsman designed in 1903 by The Allied Arts Co (as was its neighbor at 1919 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor. Evan G Evans, from Chicago, IL, arrived in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s, and married Matilee Loeb in 1898. The Mr & Mrs Evans were prominent in the society pages. The second owner, William (Will) Jenkins, was like many of his neighbors, a Capitalist. Jenkins appears to have had his hand in many enterprises, including the Madera Canal & Irrigation Company. Mrs. Jenkins passed away August 5, 1933, at her home at 148 S Irving Blvd, survived by her husband.

12 – John H & Evangeline “Eva” Rose Clark Tupper and Thomas M & Mary P Sloan Residence – 1919 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

John H and Wilbur S Tupper were born in Evansville, Wisconsin, the children of John H and Mary Sophia Foster Tupper. In the 1800’s the brothers relocated in San Francisco found themselves in the insurance industry. Wilbur Tupper became Vice-President of Conservative Life and again both brothers moved to Los Angeles. Wilbur was destined for success and after the death of then-president Frederick Hastings Rindge, he became president of both Conservative Life and Pacific Mutual (founded by Leland Stanford). Wilbur’s house was located at 2237 S Harvard Blvd and John’s at 1919 La Salle Ave, within the same tract. In 1906 Wilbur suddenly resigned from the company in scandal involving another woman (not his wife). He fled to Chicago, abandoning his wife and position. His brother John probably suffered for his brother’s indiscretion, which may help explain his sudden departure from the neighborhood and the sale of his house to Thomas M Sloan. About the same time Thomas Sloan had been promoted to Assistant General Freight Agent of the Sante Fe Railroad. This transitional Victorian/Craftsman house was designed in 1903 by the Allied Arts Co, (as was its neighbor at 1929 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor.

13 – Charles Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich

A more modest and later addition to the neighborhood, this 1913 Craftsman Bungalow was built for Charles Kraft, Vice-President of the J C Huggins Co, a brokerage and loan company. The home was designed by Architect Earl E Scherich, and May L Greenwood, builder.

14 – Roland Paul Residence Gates – 1986 W Washington Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager (Demolished)

Between a bicycle shop and a convalescence home are the gates to 1986 W Washington Blvd, which remain the only evidence that a home designed by Hunt & Eager once stood here. Originally commissioned by Mrs. R Fitzpatrick of Pico Blvd, in February of 1905, it was quickly turned over to pioneer Col Charles F Howland, who lived around the corner at 1902 S Harvard Blvd. He attempted to sell it in September, 1905, to Walter Rose, but the deal apparently fell through. In November, 1905, Col Howland successfully sold the home to Roland Paul.

15 – Elizabeth L Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd – 1906 – Philip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed)

When this home was built, Philip Gengembre Hubert, celebrated New York City architect, was listed as the owner. It was most-likely designed by him on speculation. His residence was already established in 1903 at 2144 S Hobart Blvd. Hubert was responsible for designing many New York City landmarks, including the Chelsea Hotel, and after nearly 40 years in practice Hubert retired to Los Angeles, where he died in 1911. This home was sold to Elizabeth L Kenney, the second female to graduate the law department at Stanford University and continued her education at Northwestern University in Chicago. Kenney became the first practicing female attorney in Los Angeles in 1897, entering into practice with her uncle. The house, unfortunately, has been mistreated with a layer of stucco and aluminum windows. We can only hope evidence of the house’s original nature lies underneath.

16 – Commercial Block – 2034 W Washington Blvd (formerly the home of Nathaniel Dryden, 1902 S Harvard Blvd)

Evidence of how quickly Los Angeles was changing in the early 20th Century can be seen in this attractive commercial block. Nathaniel Dryden, an architect and engineer who built the Brand Library in Glendale and the Robinson Mansion in Beverly Hills, built his home on this corner in 1903. Just 20 years later it had been replaced by a commercial building already. Such was the value of land in the quick-growing city.

17 – Clara Pitt Durant Residence – 1909 S Harvard Blvd. 1908. Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

Barely visible from the street, the current owners prefer to be hidden by the trees and shrubs. This large Craftsman home was designed by Hunt & Eager for Ms. Clara Pitt Durant. A divorcee from Michigan, Ms. Pitt took her settlement and began a new life in Los Angeles. The history of the house is recorded at: www.invisiblemanor.com

18 – Charles Clifford and Belle Case Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave – 1903 – Frank M Tyler.

This house, designed by Frank M Tyler, is unusual for the neighborhood because it is completely sheathed in shingles, including the front porch columns. It is a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman in the Shingle Style, with Colonial and Tudor touches. It was built for Charles Clifford Gibbons and Belle Case Gibbons, who came to Los Angeles in 1884. Mr. Gibbons worked his way to from stock boy to general manager of Hale’s Dry Goods Store. His employer, Jas M Hale was a relation of San Francisco’s Hale’s Bros. Department Store, the national chain. C C Gibbons died in 1910 after an illness and in 1912 the house was sold to Matt and Mary Conway. Matt Conway made his business in real estate and land speculation. Coincidentally, the third owner, Jon Fukuto, was also a proprietor of a chain of Los Angeles grocery stores call Jonson’s Supermarkets (the name being a play on words, combining “Jon” and “Sons”). In 1945, after being released from the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona, Mr. Fukuto moved his family to Los Angeles where he established the business.

13c – Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich (E)
Signing a Commercial Lease
Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

01 – Harvard Street Monument – Harvard Blvd & Washington Blvd, 1902.

Nearly destroyed by neglect and vandals over decades of inner city decay, the Harvard and Hobart Boulevard monuments were restored in 2002.

02 – Frank Southerland & Grace Pirtle Hutton, and John A Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave – 1907

According to the property permit, the house was built for E B Spencer in 1906. Most likely he built this house on speculation (as he did two years earlier at 2039-2041 La Salle Ave), because according to the LA County Tax Assessor’s Office, John A Pirtle purchased this property in 1907. The same year there appears an article in the LA Herald announcing the engagement of Frank Southerland Hutton to Miss Grace Pirtle, who lived with her parents at 1819 S Union Ave, and their plans to build a house in Los Angeles after their honeymoon. Another 1907 article indicates the happy couple were married and moved into their new home on La Salle Ave. But, by 1909, they’ve moved to 1827 S Normandie and John A Pirtle is shown at the La Salle house. John Pirtle was a Southern California industrialist who appears to have made his fortune in the oil fields of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas, through a company called the Beaumont Exchange and the Oriole Oil Company. He also speculated in water, with the West Los Angeles Water Company, West Side Water Company and the Glendale Consolidated Water Company. Frank Hutton was a well-known and respected Los Angeles lawyer, a partner of the firm Schweitzer and Hutton. This 1907 house is an unassuming looking American Craftsman bungalow, which hides its actual size. Beneath the long, low slung slope of the gable is a rather large house of 2-1/2 stories. The rounded, Colonial Revival styled balcony rail is an unusual feature.

03 – Robert K Wilson, J Frank & Virginia N Waters, and Mark & Mamie (May) E Phelps Residence – 2039-2041 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Frank Dale Hudson and Julius W Krause

Dutch Colonial in West Adams Heights is a rare architectural style, probably already deemed to be passé, but two examples exist nonetheless. The other Dutch is on South Hobart, built for C I D Moore, and is turned on its side, giving it a more Cotswold appearance. This Dutch Colonial is a straight-on interpretation of the vernacular. The architect of the house is reported to be Julius W Krause. Prior to 1895 Krause was partnered with Frank Dale Hudson, of the firm Hudson and Munsell. For a time Krause was also the Superintendent of Building for the City of Los Angeles. The original builder of this house was E B Spencer, however it’s obvious he built it in 1905 on speculation (just as he did two years later the house at 2047 La Salle Ave). This house was quickly sold the same year to Robert K Wilson who Just as quickly flipped it in 1907 to J Frank Waters. Six months later Waters sold the residence to Mark and Mamie (May) E Phelps. The Phelps’s lived at this resident until Mark’s death in 1924. Mark Phelps was described as a pioneer of Los Angeles, first finding success in mining, then as a live-stock dealer. He retired just 3 months before his death. By 1926 J E Phillips who was reported to be living at this address was arrested for smuggling Moonshine Whiskey in his car. In 1943, William J Morris, a building contractor, was the resident, according to his obituary.

04 – Wilbur Wells & Blanche Lillian Smith Keim Residence – 2033 La Salle Ave – 1904

Wilbur Wells Keim graduated from the Pharmacy School at UC Berkeley in 1902. He married Miss Blanche Lillian Smith in 1903. A large reception for the couple was held at the West Adams Heights mansion of Wesley W Beckett, 2218 S Harvard Blvd. The couple began building their house on La Salle in 1904. Keim opened a pharmacy with Edward R Neill (Keim-Neill Drug Co) just a few blocks away on the Southwest corner of Washington and Normandie, at 1890 W Washington Boulevard. Their daughter, Lorraine Keim was a 1925 graduate of USC and a member of the Kappa Alpha Sorority. The house itself is a mystery. The front porch is Craftsman. The eves under the second story and the overall shape appear to be Colonial Revival. The front door with the half sidelights and smaller window openings suggest an older structure which was moved to this location and remodeled. The effect, unfortunately, isn’t quite successful.

05 – William A & Rose H Jenkins Residence – 2029 La Salle Ave – 1909

Originally the address was 1949 La Salle Ave, but a reorganization of addresses by the city to make them more uniform changed it to 2029 La Salle Ave sometime around 1909-1910.

06 – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence – 2025 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The Vickery’s lived at 341 Andrews Blvd (S St Andrews Pl), in a 1907 mansion they built for ,000. According to the LA Times and LA Herald society pages, they entertained often. In May, 1910, the Vickery’s sold their St Andrews Pl home through the Althouse Brothers for ,000, to Mrs. Frederick Fischer, and relocated to their 2025 La Salle Ave home. After Frank Vickery’s death, auction, either the house didn’t sell at auction or his wide decided to continue living at the residence. The 1923-24 Southwestern Blue Book lists her at this location, with visiting on “Third Wednesdays. “ Mrs. Vickery was also a member of the Ebell and Friday Morning Clubs. Although this house must have been smaller and less opulent than their St Andrews Place residence, it is still a handsome American Craftsman home, with only minor alterations.

07 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 2017 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is American Craftsman, and the architect and builder was the Alfred E Georgian, Co.

08 – La Salle Ave Streetscape
Looking South on La Salle Ave (from left to right):
A. 2047 La Salle Ave – Hutton-Pirtle Residence
B. 2041 La Salle Ave – Phelps Residence
C. 2029 La Salle Ave – Hull Residence
D. 2033 La Salle Ave – Keim Residence
E. 2025 La Salle Ave – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence
F. 2017 La Salle Ave – Income Property owned by Frank A Vickery

09 – Stanley Frederick & Sue A Shaffer McClung – 1959 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Robert Farquhar Train & Robert Edmund Williams

Imagine this house as it might have been in 1905: the long sloping roof of natural shingles, which would have matched the color of the shingled siding; ornate rails along the porch, widows weep, and above the bay window; a full chimney and no bars on the windows or doors. The effect would have been striking, and will again when the house is one day restored. It’s one of the most significant surviving houses on La Salle. It was designed by the architecture team of Robert Farquar Train and Robert Edmund Williams (Train & Williams), for Pacific Mutual Secretary Stanley F McClung. He was part of the “Old Company” forced out of power in the early 1930’s along with his brother-in-law George Ira Cochran.

10 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 1947 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is a handsome American Craftsman residence, making use of horizontal siding to make it appear wider.

11 – Evan G & Matilee Loeb Evans and William A & Rose H Haley Jenkins Residence – 1929 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

This home is American Craftsman designed in 1903 by The Allied Arts Co (as was its neighbor at 1919 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor. Evan G Evans, from Chicago, IL, arrived in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s, and married Matilee Loeb in 1898. The Mr & Mrs Evans were prominent in the society pages. The second owner, William (Will) Jenkins, was like many of his neighbors, a Capitalist. Jenkins appears to have had his hand in many enterprises, including the Madera Canal & Irrigation Company. Mrs. Jenkins passed away August 5, 1933, at her home at 148 S Irving Blvd, survived by her husband.

12 – John H & Evangeline “Eva” Rose Clark Tupper and Thomas M & Mary P Sloan Residence – 1919 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

John H and Wilbur S Tupper were born in Evansville, Wisconsin, the children of John H and Mary Sophia Foster Tupper. In the 1800’s the brothers relocated in San Francisco found themselves in the insurance industry. Wilbur Tupper became Vice-President of Conservative Life and again both brothers moved to Los Angeles. Wilbur was destined for success and after the death of then-president Frederick Hastings Rindge, he became president of both Conservative Life and Pacific Mutual (founded by Leland Stanford). Wilbur’s house was located at 2237 S Harvard Blvd and John’s at 1919 La Salle Ave, within the same tract. In 1906 Wilbur suddenly resigned from the company in scandal involving another woman (not his wife). He fled to Chicago, abandoning his wife and position. His brother John probably suffered for his brother’s indiscretion, which may help explain his sudden departure from the neighborhood and the sale of his house to Thomas M Sloan. About the same time Thomas Sloan had been promoted to Assistant General Freight Agent of the Sante Fe Railroad. This transitional Victorian/Craftsman house was designed in 1903 by the Allied Arts Co, (as was its neighbor at 1929 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor.

13 – Charles Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich

A more modest and later addition to the neighborhood, this 1913 Craftsman Bungalow was built for Charles Kraft, Vice-President of the J C Huggins Co, a brokerage and loan company. The home was designed by Architect Earl E Scherich, and May L Greenwood, builder.

14 – Roland Paul Residence Gates – 1986 W Washington Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager (Demolished)

Between a bicycle shop and a convalescence home are the gates to 1986 W Washington Blvd, which remain the only evidence that a home designed by Hunt & Eager once stood here. Originally commissioned by Mrs. R Fitzpatrick of Pico Blvd, in February of 1905, it was quickly turned over to pioneer Col Charles F Howland, who lived around the corner at 1902 S Harvard Blvd. He attempted to sell it in September, 1905, to Walter Rose, but the deal apparently fell through. In November, 1905, Col Howland successfully sold the home to Roland Paul.

15 – Elizabeth L Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd – 1906 – Philip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed)

When this home was built, Philip Gengembre Hubert, celebrated New York City architect, was listed as the owner. It was most-likely designed by him on speculation. His residence was already established in 1903 at 2144 S Hobart Blvd. Hubert was responsible for designing many New York City landmarks, including the Chelsea Hotel, and after nearly 40 years in practice Hubert retired to Los Angeles, where he died in 1911. This home was sold to Elizabeth L Kenney, the second female to graduate the law department at Stanford University and continued her education at Northwestern University in Chicago. Kenney became the first practicing female attorney in Los Angeles in 1897, entering into practice with her uncle. The house, unfortunately, has been mistreated with a layer of stucco and aluminum windows. We can only hope evidence of the house’s original nature lies underneath.

16 – Commercial Block – 2034 W Washington Blvd (formerly the home of Nathaniel Dryden, 1902 S Harvard Blvd)

Evidence of how quickly Los Angeles was changing in the early 20th Century can be seen in this attractive commercial block. Nathaniel Dryden, an architect and engineer who built the Brand Library in Glendale and the Robinson Mansion in Beverly Hills, built his home on this corner in 1903. Just 20 years later it had been replaced by a commercial building already. Such was the value of land in the quick-growing city.

17 – Clara Pitt Durant Residence – 1909 S Harvard Blvd. 1908. Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

Barely visible from the street, the current owners prefer to be hidden by the trees and shrubs. This large Craftsman home was designed by Hunt & Eager for Ms. Clara Pitt Durant. A divorcee from Michigan, Ms. Pitt took her settlement and began a new life in Los Angeles. The history of the house is recorded at: www.invisiblemanor.com

18 – Charles Clifford and Belle Case Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave – 1903 – Frank M Tyler.

This house, designed by Frank M Tyler, is unusual for the neighborhood because it is completely sheathed in shingles, including the front porch columns. It is a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman in the Shingle Style, with Colonial and Tudor touches. It was built for Charles Clifford Gibbons and Belle Case Gibbons, who came to Los Angeles in 1884. Mr. Gibbons worked his way to from stock boy to general manager of Hale’s Dry Goods Store. His employer, Jas M Hale was a relation of San Francisco’s Hale’s Bros. Department Store, the national chain. C C Gibbons died in 1910 after an illness and in 1912 the house was sold to Matt and Mary Conway. Matt Conway made his business in real estate and land speculation. Coincidentally, the third owner, Jon Fukuto, was also a proprietor of a chain of Los Angeles grocery stores call Jonson’s Supermarkets (the name being a play on words, combining “Jon” and “Sons”). In 1945, after being released from the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona, Mr. Fukuto moved his family to Los Angeles where he established the business.

Questions about McAslan Architects’ Agreement with Haringey
Signing a Commercial Lease
Image by Alan Stanton
10 June 2014. This empty shop at 451/3 High Road – at the corner of Forster Road – was due to become a "Design Studio". Or perhaps a "design hub"? Or perhaps a "regeneration showcase"? Or maybe we’ll enjoy a "community facility"? Each of these phrases has been used.

According to Haringey Council’s website the architects’ practice John McAslan + Partners have:
". . . signed an agreement with Haringey Council on 21 October 2013 to transform an empty shop into a design hub offering work placements and training to local people".
"The N17 Design Studio will work with the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London (CHENEL) in a pilot project to give local students the chance to learn key skills in apprenticeships."
"Haringey Council will take a five-year lease on the building and refurbish it to create a community facility in the centre of the High Road that will showcase regeneration plans and engage with local people on the future of Tottenham."

The Council’s website prominently featured a quote from Haringey Council Leader Claire Kober. It was her usual upbeat but empty burble.
"It’s fantastic to be welcoming McAslan to Tottenham. Their enthusiasm for the area is testament to its potential to be one of London’s centres for creativity, quality and opportunity.
 Equipping our young people with the skills they need to fulfil their potential is at the centre of our regeneration plans for Tottenham, and this studio will help raise aspirations as much as transform an empty building.
 Creating new business spaces will help us secure a revitalised High Road that supports our long-term ambition that everyone in Tottenham has the opportunity to succeed and thrive."

John McAslan + Partners’ website described the "agreement" as a "Memorandum of Understanding" which may or may not be the same thing. It included the same anodyne quote from Cllr Kober. John McAslan is quoted saying that:
“The new design studio will help generate employment and regeneration, creating a forum in Tottenham for the education and future of young people through structured apprenticeships”.

CHENEL the third body signing-up to the deal, was represented by Jane O’Neill, Interim Principal and Chief Executive. She said:

 “The College is very pleased to partner Haringey Council and JMP to develop the N17 Design Studio, playing such a key role in improving the career choices and achievement of local people. By offering essential training and excellent opportunities for work experience, together we will raise Tottenham’s profile throughout London as a highly desirable location in which to study, work and live.”

So nothing much to get your teeth into about what is actually going to happen and be achieved in the hub/studio/ community facility/regeneration showcase. But there were photos and lots of smiles on McAslan’s website.

More Questions than Answers

In general I am very positive about new training opportunities for young people from Tottenham. But I’m also sceptical about the lack of openness in the process which led to this initiative being set up.
  Behind the smiles in October 2013, what was announced seems vague, to say the least. And raises lots of questions. To some of which there may be entirely reasonable answers.
  For example, why does the plan appear to require a subsidy of public money to McAslan? The firm is described by the Council’s website as: "a global architect firm with "enthusiasm for the area". So I wonder why this enthusiasm didn’t extend to finding a few quid of their own to buy a lease? Why is the Haringey taking – or perhaps had already taken (?) – a five year lease on the premises when the "groundbreaking partnership" is "a 12-month pilot project"?
  When will this "partnership" begin. We are already eight months from the signing. Has Haringey bought the lease? When? And costing how much?
  In a tweet from Claire Kober on 21 October 2013 she gave the starting date as January 2014. Later, this became Spring 2014; and later still, June 2014. In yet another tweet on 11 June 2014, Claire Kober wrote: "in the Autumn. No date as yet". (Click to view Claire Kober’s tweets and replies on the topic .)

Starchitect or Celebrity Chef?

What will McAslan Architects actually bring to Tottenham and do in their "Design Studio" that they couldn’t do as well or better by offering training and "structured apprenticeships" in one of the existing London offices?
  How "global" and famous does a starchitect have to be for Haringey to buy them a lease on High Road Tottenham? is there a "level playing field" between McAslan and other firms of architects who might want to get involved? How many other firms from different professions are being invited to discuss signing a "Memorandum of Understanding" with Haringey. What are the listed criteria for our Council to buy leases for international commercial businesses to tempt them to come to Tottenham? Who assessed McAslan and other firms against these criteria and how and when? Or was this perhaps done with a personal introduction?
  I even wonder if McAslan been invited simply to lend some glamour and wider confidence to Haringey’s planned off-the-shelf, bog-standard towerblock plans. Are McAslans like a celebrity chef hired to lend their endorsement to the schemes cooked-up by others? Some important lunch somewhere with important people, perhaps?

The Muswell Hill Colonial Administration

The location of the "Design Studio" is in Bruce Grove ward, and some twenty metres across High Road Tottenham from what used to be High Cross ward and now – after the boundaries were redrawn – is Tottenham Hale ward. This is in the part of Tottenham I represented as a councillor for sixteen years. (Until the end of May 2014.) So perhaps you might assume that I would and other councillors would be involved in, consulted, or at least fully informed about regeneration projects like the Design Studio.

But that’s not how things work in Haringey.

Not consulting nor properly informing is typical of how Cllr Claire Kober and her Muswell Hill Colonial administration have treated most Tottenham councillors and local residents during the so-called regeneration after the Tottenham riot in August 2011. Some recent public consultation which did take place proved to be largely a farce. (This is despite the efforts of the agency "Soundings" who carried out the most recent phase of consultation on the Council’s behalf. The Council’s response to their report confirmed my cynicism.)
  Most important, it now appears that what passes for "regeneration" plans in Tottenham will involve an attempt at social cleansing – demolishing publicly-owned housing and displacing many existing residents in order to create more privately owned blocks for middle class people. In my view this has the potential to do far more damage to the existing communities and businesses in Tottenham than the riot ever could.
  I’m not suggesting that McAslan architects are in any way complicit in this. But I am concerned that there should be clarity and public transparency about what local young people will be getting; and about the deal between McAslan, Haringey Council and CHENEL.
  In general I want to see far greater openness, not simply about this agreement, but the entire process of discussion and negotiation of "regeneration plans" in Tottenham, between Haringey Council, landowners, developers, large businesses and outside consultants,
  Too many such discussions have been conducted mainly in secret. The Council leadership and outside bodies and interests have discussed, planned and decided on the future of Tottenham behind the backs and over the heads of people living here. By not properly including local people as full "partners" and listening to and respecting our views and our lives, they treat us and Tottenham as a colony.

Cool Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease images

A few nice Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease images I found:

28d – Scott Residence – 1910 S Harvard Blvd – HCM-963
Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease
Image by Kansas Sebastian
28 – Linda Scott Residence. 1910 S Harvard Blvd. 1907. Frank M Tyler.

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 963

Departing from his usual Transitional Victorian-Craftsman Style, F M Tyler designed a mansion for Ms. Linda Scott with a Moorish façade, in 1910. The rooms of this house are arranged around a central foyer with a center staircase descending in the middle of the room from an open gallery. On the south are a feminine parlor and library; on the north is a masculine study and opulent dining room. Access to the service area is from a door hidden behind the staircase. The arrangement is meant to impress, and it does!

West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

18d – Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave
Five Things To Do Before Signing A Lease
Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

01 – Harvard Street Monument – Harvard Blvd & Washington Blvd, 1902.

Nearly destroyed by neglect and vandals over decades of inner city decay, the Harvard and Hobart Boulevard monuments were restored in 2002.

02 – Frank Southerland & Grace Pirtle Hutton, and John A Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave – 1907

According to the property permit, the house was built for E B Spencer in 1906. Most likely he built this house on speculation (as he did two years earlier at 2039-2041 La Salle Ave), because according to the LA County Tax Assessor’s Office, John A Pirtle purchased this property in 1907. The same year there appears an article in the LA Herald announcing the engagement of Frank Southerland Hutton to Miss Grace Pirtle, who lived with her parents at 1819 S Union Ave, and their plans to build a house in Los Angeles after their honeymoon. Another 1907 article indicates the happy couple were married and moved into their new home on La Salle Ave. But, by 1909, they’ve moved to 1827 S Normandie and John A Pirtle is shown at the La Salle house. John Pirtle was a Southern California industrialist who appears to have made his fortune in the oil fields of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas, through a company called the Beaumont Exchange and the Oriole Oil Company. He also speculated in water, with the West Los Angeles Water Company, West Side Water Company and the Glendale Consolidated Water Company. Frank Hutton was a well-known and respected Los Angeles lawyer, a partner of the firm Schweitzer and Hutton. This 1907 house is an unassuming looking American Craftsman bungalow, which hides its actual size. Beneath the long, low slung slope of the gable is a rather large house of 2-1/2 stories. The rounded, Colonial Revival styled balcony rail is an unusual feature.

03 – Robert K Wilson, J Frank & Virginia N Waters, and Mark & Mamie (May) E Phelps Residence – 2039-2041 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Frank Dale Hudson and Julius W Krause

Dutch Colonial in West Adams Heights is a rare architectural style, probably already deemed to be passé, but two examples exist nonetheless. The other Dutch is on South Hobart, built for C I D Moore, and is turned on its side, giving it a more Cotswold appearance. This Dutch Colonial is a straight-on interpretation of the vernacular. The architect of the house is reported to be Julius W Krause. Prior to 1895 Krause was partnered with Frank Dale Hudson, of the firm Hudson and Munsell. For a time Krause was also the Superintendent of Building for the City of Los Angeles. The original builder of this house was E B Spencer, however it’s obvious he built it in 1905 on speculation (just as he did two years later the house at 2047 La Salle Ave). This house was quickly sold the same year to Robert K Wilson who Just as quickly flipped it in 1907 to J Frank Waters. Six months later Waters sold the residence to Mark and Mamie (May) E Phelps. The Phelps’s lived at this resident until Mark’s death in 1924. Mark Phelps was described as a pioneer of Los Angeles, first finding success in mining, then as a live-stock dealer. He retired just 3 months before his death. By 1926 J E Phillips who was reported to be living at this address was arrested for smuggling Moonshine Whiskey in his car. In 1943, William J Morris, a building contractor, was the resident, according to his obituary.

04 – Wilbur Wells & Blanche Lillian Smith Keim Residence – 2033 La Salle Ave – 1904

Wilbur Wells Keim graduated from the Pharmacy School at UC Berkeley in 1902. He married Miss Blanche Lillian Smith in 1903. A large reception for the couple was held at the West Adams Heights mansion of Wesley W Beckett, 2218 S Harvard Blvd. The couple began building their house on La Salle in 1904. Keim opened a pharmacy with Edward R Neill (Keim-Neill Drug Co) just a few blocks away on the Southwest corner of Washington and Normandie, at 1890 W Washington Boulevard. Their daughter, Lorraine Keim was a 1925 graduate of USC and a member of the Kappa Alpha Sorority. The house itself is a mystery. The front porch is Craftsman. The eves under the second story and the overall shape appear to be Colonial Revival. The front door with the half sidelights and smaller window openings suggest an older structure which was moved to this location and remodeled. The effect, unfortunately, isn’t quite successful.

05 – William A & Rose H Jenkins Residence – 2029 La Salle Ave – 1909

Originally the address was 1949 La Salle Ave, but a reorganization of addresses by the city to make them more uniform changed it to 2029 La Salle Ave sometime around 1909-1910.

06 – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence – 2025 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The Vickery’s lived at 341 Andrews Blvd (S St Andrews Pl), in a 1907 mansion they built for ,000. According to the LA Times and LA Herald society pages, they entertained often. In May, 1910, the Vickery’s sold their St Andrews Pl home through the Althouse Brothers for ,000, to Mrs. Frederick Fischer, and relocated to their 2025 La Salle Ave home. After Frank Vickery’s death, auction, either the house didn’t sell at auction or his wide decided to continue living at the residence. The 1923-24 Southwestern Blue Book lists her at this location, with visiting on “Third Wednesdays. “ Mrs. Vickery was also a member of the Ebell and Friday Morning Clubs. Although this house must have been smaller and less opulent than their St Andrews Place residence, it is still a handsome American Craftsman home, with only minor alterations.

07 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 2017 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is American Craftsman, and the architect and builder was the Alfred E Georgian, Co.

08 – La Salle Ave Streetscape
Looking South on La Salle Ave (from left to right):
A. 2047 La Salle Ave – Hutton-Pirtle Residence
B. 2041 La Salle Ave – Phelps Residence
C. 2029 La Salle Ave – Hull Residence
D. 2033 La Salle Ave – Keim Residence
E. 2025 La Salle Ave – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence
F. 2017 La Salle Ave – Income Property owned by Frank A Vickery

09 – Stanley Frederick & Sue A Shaffer McClung – 1959 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Robert Farquhar Train & Robert Edmund Williams

Imagine this house as it might have been in 1905: the long sloping roof of natural shingles, which would have matched the color of the shingled siding; ornate rails along the porch, widows weep, and above the bay window; a full chimney and no bars on the windows or doors. The effect would have been striking, and will again when the house is one day restored. It’s one of the most significant surviving houses on La Salle. It was designed by the architecture team of Robert Farquar Train and Robert Edmund Williams (Train & Williams), for Pacific Mutual Secretary Stanley F McClung. He was part of the “Old Company” forced out of power in the early 1930’s along with his brother-in-law George Ira Cochran.

10 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 1947 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is a handsome American Craftsman residence, making use of horizontal siding to make it appear wider.

11 – Evan G & Matilee Loeb Evans and William A & Rose H Haley Jenkins Residence – 1929 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

This home is American Craftsman designed in 1903 by The Allied Arts Co (as was its neighbor at 1919 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor. Evan G Evans, from Chicago, IL, arrived in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s, and married Matilee Loeb in 1898. The Mr & Mrs Evans were prominent in the society pages. The second owner, William (Will) Jenkins, was like many of his neighbors, a Capitalist. Jenkins appears to have had his hand in many enterprises, including the Madera Canal & Irrigation Company. Mrs. Jenkins passed away August 5, 1933, at her home at 148 S Irving Blvd, survived by her husband.

12 – John H & Evangeline “Eva” Rose Clark Tupper and Thomas M & Mary P Sloan Residence – 1919 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

John H and Wilbur S Tupper were born in Evansville, Wisconsin, the children of John H and Mary Sophia Foster Tupper. In the 1800’s the brothers relocated in San Francisco found themselves in the insurance industry. Wilbur Tupper became Vice-President of Conservative Life and again both brothers moved to Los Angeles. Wilbur was destined for success and after the death of then-president Frederick Hastings Rindge, he became president of both Conservative Life and Pacific Mutual (founded by Leland Stanford). Wilbur’s house was located at 2237 S Harvard Blvd and John’s at 1919 La Salle Ave, within the same tract. In 1906 Wilbur suddenly resigned from the company in scandal involving another woman (not his wife). He fled to Chicago, abandoning his wife and position. His brother John probably suffered for his brother’s indiscretion, which may help explain his sudden departure from the neighborhood and the sale of his house to Thomas M Sloan. About the same time Thomas Sloan had been promoted to Assistant General Freight Agent of the Sante Fe Railroad. This transitional Victorian/Craftsman house was designed in 1903 by the Allied Arts Co, (as was its neighbor at 1929 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor.

13 – Charles Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich

A more modest and later addition to the neighborhood, this 1913 Craftsman Bungalow was built for Charles Kraft, Vice-President of the J C Huggins Co, a brokerage and loan company. The home was designed by Architect Earl E Scherich, and May L Greenwood, builder.

14 – Roland Paul Residence Gates – 1986 W Washington Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager (Demolished)

Between a bicycle shop and a convalescence home are the gates to 1986 W Washington Blvd, which remain the only evidence that a home designed by Hunt & Eager once stood here. Originally commissioned by Mrs. R Fitzpatrick of Pico Blvd, in February of 1905, it was quickly turned over to pioneer Col Charles F Howland, who lived around the corner at 1902 S Harvard Blvd. He attempted to sell it in September, 1905, to Walter Rose, but the deal apparently fell through. In November, 1905, Col Howland successfully sold the home to Roland Paul.

15 – Elizabeth L Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd – 1906 – Philip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed)

When this home was built, Philip Gengembre Hubert, celebrated New York City architect, was listed as the owner. It was most-likely designed by him on speculation. His residence was already established in 1903 at 2144 S Hobart Blvd. Hubert was responsible for designing many New York City landmarks, including the Chelsea Hotel, and after nearly 40 years in practice Hubert retired to Los Angeles, where he died in 1911. This home was sold to Elizabeth L Kenney, the second female to graduate the law department at Stanford University and continued her education at Northwestern University in Chicago. Kenney became the first practicing female attorney in Los Angeles in 1897, entering into practice with her uncle. The house, unfortunately, has been mistreated with a layer of stucco and aluminum windows. We can only hope evidence of the house’s original nature lies underneath.

16 – Commercial Block – 2034 W Washington Blvd (formerly the home of Nathaniel Dryden, 1902 S Harvard Blvd)

Evidence of how quickly Los Angeles was changing in the early 20th Century can be seen in this attractive commercial block. Nathaniel Dryden, an architect and engineer who built the Brand Library in Glendale and the Robinson Mansion in Beverly Hills, built his home on this corner in 1903. Just 20 years later it had been replaced by a commercial building already. Such was the value of land in the quick-growing city.

17 – Clara Pitt Durant Residence – 1909 S Harvard Blvd. 1908. Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

Barely visible from the street, the current owners prefer to be hidden by the trees and shrubs. This large Craftsman home was designed by Hunt & Eager for Ms. Clara Pitt Durant. A divorcee from Michigan, Ms. Pitt took her settlement and began a new life in Los Angeles. The history of the house is recorded at: www.invisiblemanor.com

18 – Charles Clifford and Belle Case Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave – 1903 – Frank M Tyler.

This house, designed by Frank M Tyler, is unusual for the neighborhood because it is completely sheathed in shingles, including the front porch columns. It is a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman in the Shingle Style, with Colonial and Tudor touches. It was built for Charles Clifford Gibbons and Belle Case Gibbons, who came to Los Angeles in 1884. Mr. Gibbons worked his way to from stock boy to general manager of Hale’s Dry Goods Store. His employer, Jas M Hale was a relation of San Francisco’s Hale’s Bros. Department Store, the national chain. C C Gibbons died in 1910 after an illness and in 1912 the house was sold to Matt and Mary Conway. Matt Conway made his business in real estate and land speculation. Coincidentally, the third owner, Jon Fukuto, was also a proprietor of a chain of Los Angeles grocery stores call Jonson’s Supermarkets (the name being a play on words, combining “Jon” and “Sons”). In 1945, after being released from the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona, Mr. Fukuto moved his family to Los Angeles where he established the business.

19 – James G & Rose Ganahl Donovan Residence – 20th Street (formerly located at 2202 S Western Ave) – 1903 – Robert Brown Young

27b – Atkinson Residence – 1903 S Harvard Blvd
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27 – John F & Susie E Atkinson Residence. 1903 S Harvard Blvd. 1906. Frank D Hudson Hudson & William A Munsell.

When a local church purchased this property on the prominent southwest corner of Harvard and Washington Boulevards, the first thing they did was remodel the space to accommodate services. Among the renovations were the removal of the grand staircase, mantles, and floors entirely made of solid birds-eye maple, in order to make the house appear “new.” Unfortunately, the HPOZ only protects the exterior of the house. Although the original wood-cased windows were replaced with modern aluminum ones, the old mansion retains its shape and overall character. J F Atkinson was a contractor and builder in Los Angeles. The Atkinson family also owned a house in Ocean Park, where they often entertained guests.

West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”