Archive for January 2016

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Agreement to resume full operations at Port Metro Vancouver
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The governments of Canada and British Columbia and Port Metro Vancouver have
reached agreement with members of the United Truckers Association and Unifor to end the 28-day work disruption at Port Metro Vancouver and resume full operations as of Thursday March
27, 2014.

Learn more: www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca/2014/03/agreement-to-resume-full-o…

Image from page 602 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)
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Identifier: lambstextileindu01brow
Title: Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, John Howard, 1840-1917 Foster, E. Everton Norris, Edith Mary, b. 1858
Subjects: Textile industry — United States Industrialists
Publisher: Boston, Mass., James H. Lamb company
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Oct. 16,1877, as the Shaw Stocking Company, with a capital stock of ,000. The first mill was two small rented rooms in which were operated a fewShaw knitting machines. As the business increased, ^lill No. i was built,238 feet long and 40 feet wide, three stories in height. The business,which, consisted of the weaving of hosiery, prospered, and soon it becamenecessary to enlarge the plant. jIill No. 2 was then built, 251 feet longand 75 feet wide, with two stories over a high basement; and, subse-quently. Mill No. 3, 235 feet long, 74 feet wide, two stories high. Thesewere followed by !Iill No.4. 245 feet long, 118 feet wide,with two stories anda storage basement, which was devoted exclusively to carding and spinningcotton yarns. In the latter were installed 12,432 modern spindles, mak-ing the finest quality of combed yarns for use in the companys produc-tion of Shawnit hosiery. The capital stock was increased from time yv-.«

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1^ ^ s t ^ 8 *v •!> i ^^ H 3 ^ ^ S ^ ^ ^ i 0^; OF THE UNITED STATES 4SI to time until, in 1911, it was placed at 0,000. The 700 Shaw loomsand 12,432 spindles produced Shawknit mens half hose and childrenslong stockings, woven from cotton, merino, wool, worsted, lisle and linenyarns, the goods being of various weights from heavy to gauze. In 1911, Mill No. I was used by the box-making and printing depart-ment, and by a dyeing and oxydizing department. To Mill No. i was at-tached the engine and dynamo-rooms and the boiler-house. Mill No. 2 wasdevoted to finishing, to storage, packing and shipping, and to machine andcarpenter shops. The four large mill buildings were in 1911 furnished withheat and power from Corliss, Rollins and Mcintosh and Seymour steamengines, and the corporation owned its own dynamo and electric lightingplant, as well as its own water plant. The establishment gave employmetitto 600 men and women as operatives and helpers in the various processesof manipulatin

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Empower DC: Protect Tenants Rights: Condo Conversion 1

Empower DC: Protect Tenants Rights: Condo Conversion 1

November 28, 2006 Empowerment Circle
Speaker: Kofi Reed of the University Legal Services

This segment: Condo Conversion Part 1.
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Nice Resume photos

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Image from page 133 of “Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the
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Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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MNGOIA, CIALOATJK.

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Image from page 248 of “The wonders of modern mechanism. A résumé of recent progress in mechanical, physical, and engineering science” (1896)
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Identifier: wondersofmodernm00cochuoft
Title: The wonders of modern mechanism. A résumé of recent progress in mechanical, physical, and engineering science
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Cochrane, Charles Henry, 1856-
Subjects: Inventions Mechanical engineering Machinery
Publisher: Philadelphia J.B. Lippincott
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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ry a toolthat will travel around the edge of a large hole, taking offa ciiip or shaving that requires little power. The every-day drill-press is a convenient tool, to befound in all machine-shops, but as it bores only one holeat a tune, and usually has a hand-feed to avoid danger ofbreaking the drills, its operation is too slow to admit ofsome mechanisms being produced at low cost. To reducecost of the manufactured product there have been intro-duced a variety of multiple drills that will form a largenumber of holes at one operation. There are two-spindleand three-spindle rail-drilling machines, for making theholes by which railway rails are connected through themedium of fish-plates. Four-, six-, and eight-spindlemachines are made for use in boring holes in rows, atspaced distances, a very common requirement. One ofthese is the Niles multiple drill shown in Fig. 55. Thishas six spindles, three of which are driven from one endand three from the other end, by the cone-pulleys, securing

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MACHINE TOOLS. 241 more power than could be had if they were all driven fromone pulley. The table is provided with water-trough andpower-pump for keeping a continuous supply of lubri-cant on the work during drilling. This arrangement ofdrills is of great advantage when holes of different sizeand depth are to be drilled at the same time in the same ordifferent pieces. A somewhat similar machine is madewith three spindles for either drilling or tapping holes.Tapping is the cutting of an internal thread in a hole sothat it may receive a screw. Another form of multipledrill has a circular table for the work, and as many astwenty-two drill-spindles above it, so that numerous holesof odd or irregular arrangement may be drilled at one time.The drills are arranged in two groups, one group having afaster speed than the other for use in boring smaller holesor in softer metal. William Sellers & Co. build universal drilling; machinesarranged so as to drill the hole in any required direction.L

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Basic Warehouse Real Estate Rental and Leasing Information to Check Out

Basic Warehouse Real Estate Rental and Leasing Information to Check Out
Before leasing a warehouse space, entrepreneurs first need to locate the best space suitable for them and the business they plan on having. … Before signing any contract, check all terms, conditions and clauses written in it; read between the lines …
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5 Things to Do Before You Sign an Apartment Lease
Apartment hunting can be stressful, especially if you live in a city with a tight rental market and low apartment vacancy rates. So it's no surprise that when you finally find a place that seems right, you may be in a rush to seal the deal. [Median …
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Image taken from page 679 of ‘Illustrated Official Handbook of the Cape and South Africa. A résumé of the history, conditions, populations, productions, and resources of the several colonies, states, and territories. Edited by John Noble. [With a map.]’

A few nice Resume images I found:

Image taken from page 679 of ‘Illustrated Official Handbook of the Cape and South Africa. A résumé of the history, conditions, populations, productions, and resources of the several colonies, states, and territories. Edited by John Noble. [With a map.]’
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Title: "Illustrated Official Handbook of the Cape and South Africa. A résumé of the history, conditions, populations, productions, and resources of the several colonies, states, and territories. Edited by John Noble. [With a map.]", "Miscellaneous Official Publications"
Contributor: NOBLE, John – Clerk of the House of Assembly, Cape of Good Hope
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 010096.i.18."
Page: 679
Place of Publishing: Cape Town
Date of Publishing: 1893
Publisher: J. C. Juta & Co.
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000598048

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‘Explore’.
Download the PDF for this book (volume: 0) Image found on book scan 679 (NB not necessarily a page number)
Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

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Image from page 248 of “Voyage pittoresque en Asie et en Afrique : résumé général des voyages anciens et modernes …” (1839)
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Identifier: voyagepittoresqu02eyri
Title: Voyage pittoresque en Asie et en Afrique : résumé général des voyages anciens et modernes …
Year: 1839 (1830s)
Authors: Eyries, J. B. B. (Jean Baptiste Benoit), 1767-1846 Boilly, Jules
Subjects: Voyages and travels Discoveries in geography
Publisher: Paris : Furne
Contributing Library: Field Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: The Field Museum’s Africa Council

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du Soudan, 128. Yeou, riv. du Soudan, 122. Yolofs, nègres de Sénégambie, 106. Io/o/s(royaumedes), en Sénégambie, 107. Youriba, royaume du Soudan, 126. Zabou, vill. des Oasis, 137. Zaïnah (ruines de», 147. Zaïre, fleuve du Congo, 94. Zambèzc, fl. du gouv. de Mozambique, 50. Zaïnbi, mont, du Congo, 95. Zambo, v. du gouv. de Mozambique, 50. Zammourah, ville dAlgérie, 147. Zamzi, riv. du Congo, 95. Zanguebar (côte de), pays de lAfrique orient., 4S, 49.Zanzibar, ile de iOcéan-Indieu, sur la côte de Zjnguebar, 49.Zarai, plaine dAbyssinie, 31.ZARCO(Jean-Gonsalve), voyag. portugais, découvre Madère, 114.Zegzeg, pays du Soudan. 126.Zciyhan, Yill. du Soudan, 121,Zeylalt, ville dAbyssinie, 48.Zimboa, v.du gouv. de Mozambique, 50.Ziz, Qeuvede lempire de Maroc. 151.Zizibe, cap du royaume de Tunis, 144.Zoulas, tribu cafre* 89.Zourc-Veld, cant. de la colonie du Cap, S2»Zuéla, ville du Soudan 121.Zu ellendam, ville du Cap, 63. FIN DE LA TABLE ANALYTIQUE D: VOYAGE ES vFRIOl ■■■

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«60 TABLE ANALYTIQUE DU VOYAGE EN AFRIQUE. Saldagne, baie de la colonie du Cap, 74.Salé, port de lemp. de Maroc, 152.Saloum, ville de Sénégambie, 108.Sai.t, voy. angl. en Abyssinie, 30, 41;— au Zanguibar, 49, 50.Salvages, s les dépendant de Madère, 114.Summanoud, ville dEgypie, 4.Samaulis, tribu du roy. dxdel, 48.Samba-Conlaye, vill. du Bondou, 111.Samcn, prov. dAbyssinie, 32.Samhouà, ville dEgypie, 12.Samnou, vill. du Soudan, 124.Samouenchaï, prov, du Congo, 96.Samoun, grotte dEgypte, : 1.Sanafé, mont. dAbyssinie, 36.Sangara, contrée de Guinée. 106.Sangouia, ville de Guinée, 105.Sangouin, état de Guinée, 101.Sansanding, ville du Soudan, 119.Sanla-Cruz, une des Canaries, 114.San-Thomé, île aux Portugais eu Guinée, 103.Saouakim, ville de Nubie, 30.Sas-el-Hadjar, vill. dEgypte, 4.Savap.y, voy. franc, en Egypte, 4.ScBîiiDr(George), voy. allein. au cap de Bonne-Espérance, 66.Sebhn, ville du Soudan, 121.Seboua, ville de r^ubie, 19.Séclaves, peuplade de Madagascar, 58

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Places4Students.com Partners with University of Victoria to Provide OffCampus

Places4Students.com Partners with University of Victoria to Provide OffCampus
Places4Students.com will simplify the process for students to search for off-campus housing accommodations near the university's campuses. All student services are free, including rental property searches, student sublet postings and roommate profile …
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How to find last minute student halls in London
Universities always have a student accommodation team who will give you free advice and help, whether you are looking for a place in their halls of residence, or private accommodation off campus. You'll find plenty of information by browsing your …
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Hexagonal WBT’s

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Hexagonal WBT’s
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Trying to figure out as many possible ways to tessellate each waterbomb molecule. Recent conversations with Beth Johnson’s have encouraged me to resume my waterbomb studies of way back when, and this is a set of CP’s that I’m doing for the write-up. I’ve stumbled across some interesting assortments that I hadn’t encountered before, which I am excited about.

Yes, this is the only "legal" assortment of hexagonal waterbombs I could think of, though I’d be interested in seeing other solutions!

Best to be viewed in full-size. Drawn with Inkscape.

Image from page 348 of “The Martins of Cro’Martin” (1873)
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Identifier: martinscromartin00leve
Title: The Martins of Cro’Martin
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Lever, Charles James, 1806-1872
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Chapman and Hall
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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oulike to make it so; and youll tell me all the news of Oughte-rard—all about every one thci-e, for I know them, at least byname, and will be charmed to hear about them. jMr. Scanlan wants an answer, miss, immediately, said aservant, presenting Maiy with a few lines written in pencil. She opened the paper and read the following: Nelliganoffers seventy pounds for the two black horses. Is he to havethem ? Sir Peter shows an incipient spavin on the off leg, andI think hed be well sold. Tell Mr. Scanlan Ill send him an answer by-and-by, saidshe, dismissing the servant. Then ringing the bt.il, she whis-pered a few words to the man who answered it. I have justsent a message to tell Mr. Nelligan I wish to speak to him/*said she, resuming her place on the sofa. It is a mere busi«ness matter, added she, seeing that Mrs. Nelligan waited forsome explanation. And now, when have you heard from yourson? Is he learning to spare himself anything of those greatefforts he imposes upon his faculties?

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A COUNTRY AUCTION. 301 This was to toucli the most sensitive chord in all her heart,and so she burst forth into a description of Josephs daily lifeof toil and study; his labours, his self-denial, his solitary,joyless existence, all calling up in turn her praises and hersympathy. And I, cried she, am always saying-, what is it all for?—whats the use of it?—who is to be the better of it? Suretheres only himself to get whatever his father leaves behindhim; and a pretty penny it is! Not that yoii, would think so;but for the like of us, and in our station, its a snug fortune.Hell have upwards of two thousand a year, so that theres noneed to be slaving like a Turk. Your sons ambitions take, very probably, a higher rangethan mere money-making, said Mary, He has a good rightto suppose that his abilities may win him the highest of rewards!But heres Mr. Nelligan. And she advanced courteously tomeet him at the door. Flushed and heated by the scene he had just quitl^j, andevidently embarrasse

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Image from page 451 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev08amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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hands of a receiver. For the last threemonths, however, the traffic has been more than doubledand we trust that this prosperity may continue long enoughfor the receiver, Chester W. Chapin, to resume the use of hisold title of president. Notwithstanding the popular impression that Florida isa low, flat country, the Consumers Company makes use ofwater power, having built a dam across the Hillsboroughriver at a point indicated in the accompanying map. Thismap shows the location of the street railway lines which ag-gregate 30 miles, all operated by electricity. The equipmentcomprises 27 motor and 3 trail cars, which have been severe- ly taxed to carry the traffic, especially in evenings, between5 and 8 p. m. By the courtesy of George D. Munsing, superintendent ofthe street railway companies, we have received the photo-graphs of the camp scenes and tiie map which are reproducedhere. The map shows the location of the troops which itwill be seen are encamped in all parts of the city. One of

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CUBAN VOLUNTEERS—TAMPA. the most interesting of these pictures is that showing a com-pany in one of the regiments of Cuban volunteers organizedin Tampa. The others are scenes in camp showing the bravesoldier boy at home and, an equally important member ofmilitary society, his faithful though at times obstinate ally,the army mule. Two of the views show the Inie of trans-ports tied up at the wharf and troops en route to take ship forwhat are at this writing (thougli we hope not for long) for-eign ports. CONSOLIDATION AT TRENTON, N. J. It is announced that the Trenton Passenger RailwayCompany is about to consolidate with the Ewing PassengerRailway Company, the Mulberry Street Railway Companyand the Pennington Avenue Passenger Railway Company.The new company will be called the Trenton Street RailwayCompany. These separate companies were organized to prevent aninjunction stopping the work of extending the Trenton Pas-senger Railway; the dififerences with S. K. Wilson, one ofthe stockhold

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Negotiating NNN & CAM charges

Negotiating NNN & CAM charges

Some tips for negotiating NNN & CAM charges are to review recent statements from the landlord before signing the lease to understand what is being billed. Of course, inquire about any upcoming expenses that may increase the bill. Also, remember to request and carefully review CAM/NNN reconciliation statements that are periodically prepared (typically annually).

Contact our office:
(888) 926-9193
cs@justelementary.com
www.JustElementary.com

This is part of a YouTube Playlist for Lease Negotiation Information.

Always consult legal professionals for any legal matter including contracts.
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Image from page 41 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)

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Image from page 41 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)
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Identifier: lambstextileindu01brow
Title: Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, John Howard, 1840-1917 Foster, E. Everton Norris, Edith Mary, b. 1858
Subjects: Textile industry — United States Industrialists
Publisher: Boston, Mass., James H. Lamb company
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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of woolengoods. Some of this cotton, grown on copper soil, is quite Red. TheSmooth Peruvian is shorter and resembles the Gulf Cotton of theUnited States, while the Sea Island resembles Florida Sea Island. The production of cotton in Mexico in 1909 was estimated at 125,000bales of 500 pounds each. Turkey produced 70,000 bales of cotton in 1909. Considerable quantities of cotton are grown in other countries, amongwhich are Greece, with about 15,500 bales; Italy, 10,000 bales; Indo-China, 15,000 bales; Africa, other than Egypt, 25,000 bales; Haiti, 10,000bales; Dutch East Indies, 10,000 bales: Japan, 5,000 bales; Korea, 5,000bales; Argentina, about 5,000 bales, and the Philippine Islands, 4,000bales. While cotton growing in Australia has not passed the experimentalstage, the present indications in Queensland are promising. The institutionby the commonwealth of a bonus to the growers is serving as an incentive,but the requirements for local consumption will readily absorb the pro-duction.

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OF THE UNITED STATES 17 EGYPTIAN COTTON BY C. M. BLAISDELL The introduction of cotton into Egypt is due to a certain Mako Bey,who, about the year 1820, made the first attempts in his property nearAlexandria. It is from him that the Mako Cotton or Mako BaumwoUe,principally employed in Germany, comes. The French call the same thingTumel Cotton, after a certain Tumel, gardener of Mako Bey, who occu-pied himself principally with these plantations. This culture, protected by the Vice King, Mehemed Aly, acquiredsome importance in a few years. But the great development of theindustry occurred after the Civil War in America, on account of thefabulous prices that were paid at that time. It is not positively known where the first seeds came from, or ifthe primitive color was brown, or if this color was acquired from at-mospheric influences or the action of the soil. Since it has been used formanufacturing it has been distinguished by four principal qualities, longfibre, strength, silkiness of t

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Image from page 239 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)
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Identifier: lambstextileindu01brow
Title: Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, John Howard, 1840-1917 Foster, E. Everton Norris, Edith Mary, b. 1858
Subjects: Textile industry — United States Industrialists
Publisher: Boston, Mass., James H. Lamb company
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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WesfAfrica, .Australia and India. (See Plate 12.) Sisal was introduced into Florida by Dr. Henry Perrine about 1836 and37, and .some was planted at Indian Key and some planted at Biscayne Bay.and from this the plant spread rapidly, though little was done until lateyears to promote its cultivation. The true sisal plant, Agave rigida sisalana, is a native of Hawaii, andhas been introduced into the Philippine Islands with very satisfactory re-sults. This plant is very closely allied to the maguey of the PhilippineIslands, which has recently been identified as Agave cantula. One acre willyield about 730 pounds of fibre, and its market value approximates that ofsisal. (See Plate 12.) In 1880 there were 165 establishments manufacturing cordage andtwine in the United States, with a capital of ,140,475: in 1890 there were150 establishments, with a capital of ,351,883; and in 1900 there were105 establishments, with a capital amounting to ,275,470; in 1905 there PLATE XII~Hemp and Sisal

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1. Cutting tlie Hemp. 2. Breaking the Same. 3. Hackling. 4. Stripping and Scraping. . Fibres of Hemp and Manila. (j. Sisal Field. 7. Cutting Leaves. 8. Trimming of Thorns. 9. Loading Leaves on Cars. JAMES H LAMB CO- OF THE UNITED STATES 195 were 103 establishments, with a capital of ,110,521 ; the decrease in thenumber of establishments being caused by the frequent consolidation ofseveral small plants under one incorporation. Sisal hemp and maguey are used in the United States principally forbinder twine, tarred lath and fodder yarns, and for other cordage purposes.In Yucatan and South America sisal is employed in the manufacture ofsaddlecloths, hammocks, girdles, bridles, cordage nets and lines, while inthe Philippines a great deal of maguey is produced for local consumption.The maguey plant was probably introduced into the Philippine Islands fromMexico. It is now cultivated in nearly every province of the archipelago.The fibre of the plant, which is white and finer and longer tha

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Image from page 147 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)
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Identifier: lambstextileindu01brow
Title: Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, John Howard, 1840-1917 Foster, E. Everton Norris, Edith Mary, b. 1858
Subjects: Textile industry — United States Industrialists
Publisher: Boston, Mass., James H. Lamb company
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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special mechanism has been introduced to overcome this defect,and by constantly changing the ratio produced a more uniform distributionof the coils. Previous to Hill & Browns Patent the friction or drum type of ma-chine was constructed with the thread guide some distance from the sur- 112 TEXTILE INDUSTRIES face of the cop and reciprocated by special mechanism. The Hill & Browninvention departed from this structure and introduced an angular slot inthe drum, extending from N to M, through which the yarn was threaded,thus operating as a cam to force the yarn from end to end of the traverseat each evolution of the drum. Machines constructed upon this principlehave been widely used in mill practice, as a much higher yarn speed wassecured than by structures using the reciprocating guide. Their use hasbeen largely confined to Great Britain and the continent of Europe, as themill requirements in the United States are such that the machines have notmet with a ready introduction here.

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OF THE UNITED STATES 113 THE HISTORY OF WEAVING. The art by which threads or yarns of any substance are interlaced soas to form a continuous web is perhaps the most ancient of the manufactur-ing arts, since clothing must always have been a primal necessity to man.A knowledge of weaving seems to have been inherent to a slight extent inall races, and to have developed as they emerged from savagery, beginningwith the plaiting of rushes or other fibrous materials into mats and aprons,followed by rudely woven cloths. A piece of flaxen cloth, plaited ratherthan woven, was found in the lake dwellings of Switzerland, which is sup-posed to have been made by prehistoric man in the Stone Age; and invarious ethnographical museums may be found specimens of the handiworkof peoples who lived in those portions of the globe which were unexploreda few centuries ago, and which were quite unknown to the ancients. Nearlyall these races when first visited by civilized man had more or less knowl-edge of wea

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Image from page 374 of “Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;” (1911)
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Identifier: lambstextileindu01brow
Title: Lamb’s textile industry of the United States, embracing biographical sketches of prominment men and a historical résumé of the progress of textile manufacture from the earliest records to the present time;
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Brown, John Howard, 1840-1917 Foster, E. Everton Norris, Edith Mary, b. 1858
Subjects: Textile industry — United States Industrialists
Publisher: Boston, Mass., James H. Lamb company
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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s, and was admitted a free-man in 1678. Freegrace. his son, was born about 1690, and his marriageto Mary Sibley was the first in Sutton. He was one of the original pro-prietors of the town, a brick mason, and helped to build the old StateHouse in Boston. Malachi, son of Freegrace, and great-grandfather ofEdwin T. Marble, was born in Sutton, where he became prominent. Heenlisted April 11, 1759, in Colonel John Chandlers regiment, and during theFrench War was also in Captain Samuel Clark Powers company, Brigadier-General Ruggles regiment. During the Revolution he was collector oftaxes for Sutton. Andrew, grandfather of Edwin Tyler, was the oldest sonof Malachi, and was born in Sutton in 1761. He was a mail-carrier betweenBoston and Hartford. Royal Tyler, father of Edwin Tyler, was fourthchild of Andrew, born in Sutton in 1797. He built up a reputationthroughout the country for his ability to raise prize stock, and he wasmuch interested in the Worcester County Agricultural Society in its

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C^2^^^^^^ X^^^^^^^J OF THE UNITED STATES 311 early days. He was commissioned lieutenant of the 5th regiment, Sept.20, 1826, and was captain of the Sutton rifles in 1830 and 1831. flemarried Ann Bailey Clement, of Worcester, Sept. 27, 1825, she being adaughter of Moses and Sarah (Bailey) Clement, a descendant of oldEssex County families. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of hisnative town, and also at the Worcester County Manual Training School,that being the old name of the Worcester Academy, having removed toWorcester with his parents in 1841. At the age of eighteen he enteredthe machine- shop of Albert Curtis, where he served an apprenticeship ofthree years. He then worked in various machine shops in the city ofWorcester as a journeyman, foreman and superintendent; for some timehe was in the employ of A. & S. Thayer, and afterwards was foreman forThayer, Houghton & Co., manufacturers of machinists tools. Later he wassuperintendeint for E. C. Cleve

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