Archive for March 2016

Cool Resume images

Some cool Resume images:

A wishlist to start 2013 ^-^
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Image by . Paillette .
A mon tour de faire une *petite* liste. C’est rigolo. ♥ Et ça permet d’échanger! ♥

Alooors…Par où commencer?!

J’aimerais absolument trouver de nouveaux yeux pour Keara déjà. Leeke? ED? Mako? Je suis perdue! ^-^’
Et j’aurais aimé lui trouver une petite chaise design comme on voit sur la première photo – j’adore cette série de meubles miniatures – mais j’ai peur que ce soit trop petit. T-T

Evidemment toujours plus d’habits (la photo avec les sacs était trop choue!)..Et ensuite on passe aux choses sérieuses..Que j’ai listées mais à mon avis, ça ne se fera pas cette année! </3

Une mnf Chloe..car elles sont magnifiques! J’aimerais une copine pour Lilja-Rose et j’ai une idée de personnage pour une mnf Chloe..Elle serait moderne et trop fashion et trop classe! T-T

Et toujours plus de petits Latis! Une miel avec yeux ouverts et mystics! Je pense que ce modèle irait bien avec ma Lea! ^-^ Et la miel mystic me fait rêver…Le tan m’importe peu mais ces Miels sont très jolies. ♥ J’adore la Miel de Nettle. ♥♥
Et une Coco ou une Lumi, elles sont craquantes avec leur petit sourire! Ça changerait de la moue de Keara hihi!

Donc en résumé..1 mnf et 3 latis..tout va bien!!

Edit 06/02: ………Je rajoute dès à présent une puki puki pong à cette liste! T-T

~~~

My turn to make a *short* list. It’s funny and we can share thoughts about our wishes! ♥

Soooo..Where do I start?

I absolutely need to find new eyes for Keara! Leeke? Ed? Mako? I’m so lost!
And I would have loved to get her some modern chair like you see on the first picture – I love this collection of mini furniture – but I’m afraid it would be way too small. T-T

And of course, more and more clothes (the picture with the little shopping bags looked so cute!)..And then..Here comes the trouble! I listed those dolls but I don’t think I’m going to get them this year..</3

A mnf Chloe, because they look gorgeous! I would love to get a friend for Lilja-Rose, and I have a character idea already for a Chloe..She would be modern, stylish, and so beautiful! T-T

And more and more cute Latis! A miel with open eyes and mystic eyes! I think Miel would go along well with Lea! ^-^ And mystic Miel makes me dream…I don’t care about the tan ^-^but I love those dolls you see on the pictures! Nettle’s miel is wonderful. ♥
And a Coco or a Lumi; they are so cute with their tiny smile! It would change me from my pouty Keara! They look so fun. ♥

So..to sum up: 1 mnf and 3 latis..Okay, everything is fine! Totally fine!! haha

Edit 02/06: …..I now add a puki puki pong to this list.. T-T

Credits:
(Please just drop me a line if you want me to remove your picture ♥)
1. M112 Pod workstation, 2. 11cm Obitsu Petite Blythe amigurumi dog and Hegemony77 doll clothes shopping bags, 3. In her eyes we saw innocence and trust, 4. Irina – MNF Chloe, 5. <3, 6. Angie, 7. Coco, 8. Angel face

Montague Tube Reopening Announcement
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Image by MTAPhotos
On September 14, 2014, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo joined Metropolitan Transportation Authority leaders and elected officials from New York City to mark the restoration of normal R subway service between Brooklyn and Manhattan. The announcement, made at Whitehall St. Station, follows the successful rebuilding of the Montague Tube subway tunnel that was inundated with salt water during Superstorm Sandy. Regular R service will resume at 6 a.m. Monday. Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin

Été 2013/Summer 2013
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Image by bob august
Un résumé de l’été en une photo.
Summer is here…

Olivia Chow’s Community Art Project – Screwed Out of Our Share

Some cool Resume writing images:

Olivia Chow’s Community Art Project – Screwed Out of Our Share
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Image by Tania Liu
We paid our taxes, but what happened to our money? The Conservative Minister John Baird told Toronto to “f-off”, then he said no to new streetcars. Toronto has been "screwed out of our share of " 0 million.
Express yourself: put screws into a 24’x4’ word SCREWED, made from wood. Write about what the federal government should share with you or the city on a 24’x4’ word SHARE on a canvas.
Olivia will display our work on Parliament Hill when it resumes on Sept 14.

18_horses at full speed broke through
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Image by Jim Surkamp
About a young man from Sharpsburg and Shepherdstown who war changed into an avenging angel of death but who, at the foot of the gallows, found God.- JS.

1. Andrew Leopold’s Forlorn Hope (1) – by Jim Surkamp With Author Steve French
POST: civilwarscholars.com/?p=13287 5422 words.

2. Author Steve French on Andrew Leopold (Video Transcript & Link)
POST: civilwarscholars.com/?p=13367 2880 words
VIDEO: www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_9FQvYpQRs&feature=youtu.be TRT: 25:23

Made possible with the generous, community-minded support of American Public University system, offering a quality, affordable, online education. Interpretations in civilwarscholars.com videos and posts do not in any way reflect modern-day poilicies and positions of American Public University System. More at apus.edu

Andrew Leopold’s Forlorn Hope (1) – by Jim Surkamp With Author Steve French

Made possible with the generous, community-minded support of American Public University system, offering a quality, affordable, online education. Interpretations in civilwarscholars.com videos and posts do not in any way reflect modern-day poilicies and positions of American Public University System. More . . .

What is a mother to do?

1_Polly Zittle’s 22-year old son
Polly Zittle’s 22-year old son, Andrew – soon-to-be-hanged – had much to consider in his solitary cell in the deepest sanctum of Fort McHenry prison near Baltimore.

Warmaker Andrew T. Leopold (also Laypole, Lepole, and Isadore Laypole) had in his hands a small book that he hoped he could put in the hands of another prisoner who, unlike him, would leave the prison upright and alive.

2_The crash of battle shells
The crash of battle shells, the crushing of bones like lath and cries, the groans, the clash of sabers, the shrieking thrill of musketry, the shattering in general – had unleashed something fierce in Andrew, native to the gun – this one-time crew mate on a lazy Potomac canal boat, who a young girl named Mary described as: “well built, straight as an arrow, not handsome of face, but with an honest, grave face that one knew how to trust.”

3_He wrote in his cell on the blank leavesGlimpses_of_Heaven_frontispiece
He wrote in his cell on the blank leaves of “Glimpses of Heaven or, The Light Beyond Jordan”: My dear and kind loving mother, It is with the deepest sorrow that your humble son has to report to you the sad news of my unfortunate and much unexpected fate which is deemed for me by now. But be of good cheer. I have good grounds to think and hope that I go to a better world for I have cast myself on the mercies of our God. Look to his Son, Jesus Christ, who died upon the cross without sin that we might have eternal life by believing in him. I hope to meet you and my two sisters in that bright land where sin and troubles are no more and there to show forth love to God and Jesus Christ, our redeemer. My fate is that of a felon. I know not the day that I have heard from a minister of the Gospel that I am not to suffer death on “Hangman’s Day,” but that is poor consolation to you but it will be a consolation to know that I went willing and prepared to meet my peace maker. . . I write this hoping you may get this book and hope the gentleman who finds it may send it to you. May God be merciful to you is the prayer of your unfortunate son and brother.” – Spirit of Jefferson., April 19, 1898, Image 1.

4_Robert Baylor, the prisoner there from Charlestown
Robert Baylor, the prisoner there from Charlestown, also condemned to death but who had his commuted less than ten days after Leopold’s last, wrote in his diary that Leopold’s “Glimpses” book had underlined by Andrew many pertinent poetic lines.

5_1859_Leopold’s River of Peace
1859: Leopold’s River of Peace:

6_Andrew’s quiet days just before the war years
Andrew’s quiet days just before the war years on the deck and towing the lines for a canal boat are best put by a fellow boatman in the year 1859:

7_Only the almost inaudible ripple of the boat
Only the almost inaudible ripple of the boat in the water, the distant click of the mules’ feet, the purring of the river, the hum of insects, and occasionally chirp of a bird broke the stillness. It was almost an ideal state of repose. The days drifted by as a dream and as I look back, it was a very tranquil dream, day ran into day, sunshine into sunshine, with no care or thought for the morrow. – Ella E. Clark (ed.).

1860: War Clouds Stir Leopold To Action:

8_Even after the John Brown Raiders
Even after the John Brown Raiders, their capture, trials in a Virginia Court and hangings – Shepherdstown’s Hamtramck Guards and all militias, hard-marched even more in anticipation.

Ahead was the November election for president. Locals didn’t support Lincoln, but they didn’t support Breckinridge either. They preferred a pro-unionist “conciliator,” named John Bell. The Shepherdstown Register editor, John Zittle, the second husband of Leopold’s mother, wrote July 14, 1860:

9_There are four candidates for president
“There are four candidates for president of the United States. The contest bids fair to be the warmest ever known in the political annals of our country. The troubled waters appear so threatening to engulf us we can invoke the blessings of providence to direct us through.”

10_The Fourth of July celebration
The Fourth of July celebration at Big Spring held together – barely. It began “with the Hamtramck Guards; Capt. V. M. Butler with the spirited notes of the fife and the inspired music of the drum . . . All hands did justice in relieving the table of it’s ponderous weight of provisions ‘done up brown’ by our friend Martin Yontz,” wrote Zittle. Capt. Heskitt had earlier marched the Guards, the town militia, from the town armory in full parade dress, each man having fifteen rounds of blank cartridges. Auctioneer George McGlincey lifted his glass to:

11_The Union may the ship of state ride safely
“The Union . . . may the ship of state ride safely into port over the troubled waters.” Then C. W. Yontz counter-toasted: “To Virginia, so long as she contains the graves of Washington, Jefferson, and a Madison, she must be faithful to her glorious title of Old Dominion.”

12_Lincoln is elected. War begins
1860-April, 1861 – Lincoln is elected. War begins April, 1861:

The crisis at Fort Sumter, South Carolina changed hot words to hot guns. Virginia voted to join the secession, pending a referendum. With the secession vote planned the next day on whether or not to secede, these same local militias marched that night towards Harper’s Ferry to take the Federal arsenal.

David Hunter Strother, who joined the Federal Army, wrote of the night of April 18th at Harpers Ferry after the Federal guard blew up much of the armory to keep militias from capturing the arms there. The vote on secession in Richmond had not been completed:

13_many more were on the way
As the night advanced, the streets became more crowded with people from the town and neighborhood. By one o’clock (early April 19th) the fires had sunk in ashes, when, gloomy, chilled and fatigued, I sought a bed at the house of an acquaintance . . I did not sleep soundly and was frequently disturbed during the night by the sound of drums and the tramp of passing squadrons. . . . many more were on the way. – p. 14.

Among those on the way to enlist that April 18th was firebrand soldier William A. Morgan from his Falling Spring manse outside Shepherdstown, who was quickly made Captain of Company F of the 1st Virginia Cavalry and, as was his nature would take part in most major fights in his state and walk away from many horses shot from under him as the way of the warring life until peace arrived again at last.

14_Leopold, the next day, joined Company F
Andrew Thomas Leopold, the next day, joined Company F under Captain Morgan’s command – and influence. Two other young men about Shepherdstown, both about Leopold’s age, had the same intent to enlist in Confederate regiments and nearly at the very same time. Nineteen-year-old carpenter, Jacob Hudson, and seventeen-year-old Charles Ed Entler, a ferry boatman – were making the trip to Harper’s Ferry to join Company B of the 2nd Virginia infantry regiment under the command of this unknown, odd Col. Thomas Jonathan Jackson, with long days just ahead of sorry-making, endless drill.

15_tutelage and charisma of Capt. Morgan
But Leopold had a ferocious role model in the tutelage and charisma of Capt. Morgan.

So they all prepared. In June, Confederates under Gen. Joseph Johnston left Harper’s Ferry, eased upriver towards Falling Waters, encamping for their awaited first war-time brush with the Federal Army nearby. Leopold would come face-to-face with another mesmerizing cavalryman, J.E.B. Stuart, who, in early July on the eve of battle, told all his men in this camp:

16_you are ignorant of this kind of work
“Attention!” he cried. “Now I want to talk to you, men. . . . you are ignorant of this kind of work, and I am teaching you. I want you to observe that a good man on a good horse can never be caught. Another thing: cavalry can trot away from anything, and a gallop is a gait unbecoming a soldier, unless he is going toward the enemy. Remember that. We gallop at the enemy, and trot away, always. p. 116.
– More . . .

Leopold and Morgan – the “Reckless Invincibles:”

17_the first Battle of Bull Run/Manassas
Soon at the first Battle of Bull Run/Manassas Leopold and Morgan were both among the 150 men in the 1st Virginia Cavalry – thundering galloping, steam-nostril, horse weight hurling toward the panicked red-scarlet uniformed men in the New York Zouaves fleeing to anywhere, raised sabers at them. William Blackford remembered: “The tremendous

18_horses at full speed broke through
impetus of horses at full speed broke through their line like chaff before grain.”

Leopold was “Seeing The Elephant,” the phrase of all soldiers for beholding war’s immediate horror. It was described right after this July, 1861 battle by Morgan to his wife: By dawn the conflict began with the booming of artillery and the sharp reports of musketry, mingled with the hoarse commands given by the officers, the screams of the dying horses and the groans of the wounded which kept up without intermission until moonlight. Two whole cavalry front ranks went down as they entered the enemy’s line, myself and company were in the very center of their ranks.

19_balls flying thick all around
The balls flying thick all around – apparently as thick as hail and yet strange to say there was no one killed – two or three of us were slightly wounded, myself among the number. . . My horse, George, behaved nobly, never flinching at any time.

. . . But Others Deserted:

20_Unlike Leopold, Charles Entler
Unlike Leopold, Charles Entler and Jacob Hudson both deserted from Co. B 2nd Virginia, returning home. Entler was already back home, once again a ferry boatman at Blackford’s Landing. His B company of the 2nd Virginia had passed through Shepherdstown and

21_set on fire on June 13, 1861, the wooden covered bridge
set on fire on June 13, 1861, the wooden covered bridge across the River near the ferry. Wrote his friend, Henry K. Douglas: I saw the glowing windows in my home on the hill beyond the river . . . I realized that war had begun. . . and my soul was filled with revengeful bitterness. Two days later, on June 15th Charles Entler was reported as having deserted, resuming his ferry boat duties.

22_Jacob Hudson would desert
Jacob Hudson would desert the following spring on March 15,1862, also re-appearing in Shepherdstown, stricken from the rolls and out of uniform.

23_Leopold, though, warmed in the glow of a war-maker
Leopold, though, warmed in the glow of a war-maker:

24_Leopold wrote his mother from Camp Ashby
Leopold wrote his mother from Camp Ashby near Harrisonburg that he had a skirmish near Luray, where with sixteen men he routed a Yankee Camp, capturing 18 prisoners, wounding 12 and killing 5, capturing ten thousand dollars worth of medicines, clothing and supplies. – Martinsburg Statesmen (from the Shepherdstown Register), May 23, 1895.

This may have been an event May 6, 1862, reported with some differences by Federal Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, U. S. Army:
May 7, 1862. The Fifth New York Cavalry had a sharp skirmish with Ashby’s cavalry (7th Virginia Cavalry-JS) yesterday near Harrisonburg. They (The Federals-JS) made a succession of most spirited charges against superior numbers, killing 10, wounding many, and capturing 6 rebels. Their conduct gave the highest satisfaction. Their chief weapon was the saber. The enemy does not show himself except by cavalry. – p. 456.

August 30, 1862 – Leopold The Avenger at 2nd Manassas/Bull Run:

25_Sergeant Leopold, of the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry, was in the thickest of the fight
Sergeant Leopold, of the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry, was in the thickest of the fight and acted most gallantly during its continuance. He was wounded in three places. – Official Report by his Brigade Commander Brig. General Beverly Holcombe Robertson – pp. 746-747.

Beverly_Robertson Image of B. H. Robertson.
800px-Second_Bull_Run_Aug30_1700 Source of map. Click on map to enlarge.

The cavalry brigade of Brig. Gen. Beverly H. Robertson and the regiment of Col. Thomas Munford raced to the extreme right of the Confederate position, hoping – with the support of four batteries of horse artillery – to block the retreating Union men at Lewis Ford.

26_I charged the regiment on the hill and drove them back

Col. Asher W. Harman of the 12th Virginia Cavalry, Leopold’s and Morgan’s regiment, wrote:
At Manassas, on August 30, about 4 p.m., I was ordered, with six companies of my regiment (A, C, D, E, F, and H), to support the Second Virginia Cavalry. I found the enemy occupying the hill to the right of the Lewis house, with the First [West] Virginia Cavalry, supported by a New York and the First Michigan Cavalry, drawn up about 200 yards in their rear.

I charged the regiment on the hill and drove them back on their support, which were in quick succession broken and driven back in complete disorder. I pursued them over the run and as far as the pike near the stone bridge, capturing many prisoners, among them Colonel Brodhead and Major Atwood, of the First Michigan Cavalry, the former severely wounded. My loss was 6 men wounded. – p. 752.

Author Eric Wittenberg wrote:
The men of Robertson’s brigade formed into line and, (Harman wrote) “in wedgelike form, dashed headlong toward the battle line of blue; and as the apex of this swiftly moving mass was about to pierce the center of their line, it wavered for an instant, then broke and fled in every direction.”

27_The charge of the 12th Virginia crashed into the West Virginians
The charge of the 12th Virginia crashed into the West Virginians and drove them back upon their reserves. As one member of the 12th Virginia later wrote, the West Virginians “broke and ran and we were after them with pistol and saber.” A member of the 4th New York noted, “The Secesh used their revolvers with a determination to slaughter some of our lads” Capt. William Porter Wilken of the 1st West Virginia was left to cut his way out, and only barely escaped capture when his horse bolted. He recorded, “I think nothing of charging against equal numbers, but to charge into a whole army of cavalry and infantry and artillery and see your comrades mowed down by by their sabres and the deadly fire of their musketry and cannon, is not particularly funny.”

The savage onslaught of the 12th Virginia broke the Union line and drove it back toward Bull Run.

28_Brodhead refused, the Confederate shot and mortally wounded the Yankee officer
Adjutant Lewis Harman of the 12th Virginia met Brodhead near the Lewis Ford. Harman demanded Brodhead’s surrender and, when Brodhead refused, the Confederate shot and mortally wounded the Yankee officer. Harman rode off with Brodhead’s horse, saddle, pistols, and sabre. Brodhead received a deathbed brevet to brigadier general for his valiant stand at the Lewis Ford. . . . the 12th Virginia pursued as far as the Warrenton Turnpike. In his official report of the campaign, Stuart pointed out that the melee at the Lewis Ford “was of remarkably short duration.”

The fight at the ford, however, had been severe. Robertson’s men suffered five men killed and 40 men wounded, including Munford. One member of the 12th Virginia, a Sergeant Leopold, was wounded in three places during the furious clash at Lewis Ford. Buford’s losses were heavier, with approximately 300 casualties. – pp. 746-747.

29_Robertson’s regiments swept down upon a force greatly outnumbering them
Stuart exulted in his official report of the campaign that at Lewis Ford, “… over 300 of the enemy’s cavalry were put hors de combat, they, together with their horses and equipments, falling into our hands.” Stuart bragged about his victory, stating “Nothing could have equaled the splendor with which Robertson’s regiments swept down upon a force greatly outnumbering them, thus successfully indicating a claim for courage and discipline equal to any cavalry in the world..” – Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s Report to Gen. Robert E. Lee February 28, 1863, OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 12, Part 2 (Second Manassas) p. 737.

Winslow_Homer_Sitting_Federal

Leopold Becomes an Avenging Scout and Bushwhacker:

September – late October, 1862: Leopold, still fired by the battlefield, recuperates.

30_J.E.B.Stuart and his staff are resting at The Bower
31_overlooking the Opequon Creek
Confederate Cavalry General J.E.B.Stuart and his staff are resting at The Bower overlooking the Opequon Creek and will remain there until late, October, 1862.

32_Probably under the great oaks there, Stuart discussed
Probably under the great oaks there, Stuart discussed plans and met with Redmond Burke and Andrew Leopold to make them mail-carriers, horse-thieves, conscriptors, and his “eyes” along the rivers around Jefferson County.

33_Stuart discussed plans and met with Redmond Burke and Andrew Leopold

Image from page 291 of “The book of the ancient and accepted Scottish rite” (1885)
Resume writing
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: bookofancientac00mcc
Title: The book of the ancient and accepted Scottish rite
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: McClenachan Chas T. [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
f Extin-guishing the Lights; the yellow wax candles haveremained unlit since the previous Thursday. The Knights being round the table, at a signal fromthe Most Wise, the officers in reverse order dischargetheir several duties. We have at last re-entered the Banquet-room, andwe resume therein the seat which our Father hadprovided for us. Immortal guests, no power can henceforth depriveus of our inheritance ! Glory unto our Father!Glory unto our Father! Glory unto our Father!Love and Liberty give light and life to philosophy. Truth reappears. Proceed then, my brethren; think and act uponyour own responsibility. You are now of age! Nowyou are redeemed! You have your own life incharge, now and forever! The Master shall ever fol-low you on the way! He will be your witness, yourhelper! He will aid your weakness and extend hia 276 BOOK OF THE A. AND A. BITE. band to you in the hour of peril! The doors of theInfinite are opened unto you. Close, as in the Table Ceremony, with the Benedicttion.

Text Appearing After Image:
FUNERAL CEREMONY. DECORATIONS OF THE CHAPTER.—ROSE-CROIX. The throne, altar, and seat of the officers must behung with black. In the place formerly occupied by thedeceased, there must be a chair covered with blackcloth, strewed with tears, and an escutcheon of theScotch Rite colors, upon which is written the name ofthe deceased. The escutcheon is surmounted with adeaths head resting on two thigh-bones crossed. Thecollar of the highest degree possessed by the deceased,surrounds the escutcheon. At the lower extremity ofthe escutcheon hangs the jewel of the order, andbehind it is a sword across its scabbard, the pointdownward. KNIGHT OF THE ROSE CROIX. 277 The walls of the Chapter are strewed with black gar-lands. The coffin is placed in the centre, and upon itthe regalia of the deceased, whose feet shall be turnedtoward the west. The candlesticks, three in number,are black, surrounded with black crape, and bearingeleven lights each. Between the coffin and the West there must be atrian

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

3 Easy Steps: Net Present Value Explained with NPV Formula Example & Calculation

Free subscribed at http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mbabullshitdotcom for Net Present Value (NPV) omg I’m SHOCKED how easy..

Net Present value is an expanded version of Present Value, so if you have understood the latter, you won’t have a problem understanding this one.
An illustration.

Let’s say that you will receive a gift worth 0 from your grandma after 2 years. By calculating the value of that thing using present value you come to a conclusion that the worth of 0 two years later is like 0 today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FsGpi_W9XI
Let’s take another example of your boss giving you an incentive of 0 a year later, and you come to know that the value of the incentive at present would be 0.
So what is the net value of both the incentive and your grandma’s gift?

The math is quite simple here. You just have to add the two present values and you will come to know the net present value of the commodities, which totals 0.
You will notice that the time periods of both the cash bonus and the gift from grandma do not match. In fact, the gift comes two years later and the cash incentive comes to you only a year later. But you can still cut the cake and combine the two together.

You should also remember that the “cash flows” go both ways. This means that they can either be positive or negative. This can be illustrated like this; if you had promised your grandma of the gift then your gift cash flow would have come out negative. But in the above example, both the cash flows were positive for you. The incentive and the gift both promised an influx of cash.

What you really have to do is to put a minus sign before the thing that you lose, so in the grandma case, if you are planning to promise your grandma a present within two years that’s worth 0, you just have to find the present value and put a minus behind it. That’s the only thing behind the sign convention. No more, no less. So that effectively comes to -0.
Therefore by using the sign convention, what do you have to do is to ensure that the net present value is calculated effectively for the incentive that you will receive in a year’s time and that special gift for grandma.

So you just have to combine the two values to get the Net Present Value of , which comes from adding -0 to +0. As you can see that you don’t need to be a math whiz to calculate this. If you’re frightened by business math, by the way, you can check out my youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/MBAbullshitDotCom

Financial managers & accountants have simplified formulae at their disposal that takes care of problems more complex than the ones given above.
NPV = (any cash flow – if any) + (Cash in or out in Yr 1)^-1 + (Cash in or out in next years)^-n
Where n = the cash flow of the particular year

Don’t worry if the math of the above frightens you out of your mind. You don’t have to learn the formula. There are online tutorials available on youtube and you can easily go through these and make your life easier. Alternatively, you can find calculators and apps designed for smartphones that take care of this very aspect, so you can be assured that this is not so hard after all.

Subscribe to MBAbullshit.com and my other finance videos at http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mbabullshitdotcom
Net Present Value Explained with NPV Calculation & Net Present Value Example
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Joey: Tenants Rights Advocate at Plaza 16 Coalition Rally

Joey is a tenants rights advocate who attended the Saturday, February 1st, 2014 Plaza 16 Coalition protest rally against gentrification.

Nova Scotia NEEDS rent control!

We are in the midst of an election, and ACORN-NS is fighting to put tenants rights on the agenda, specifically the implementation of rent control. Wages stay low as rent goes up, and landlords can raise the rent as high as they want while low-income tenants feel the squeeze.

Join us for an evening of discussion and keynotes on this important issue. This even will explore some of the problems with the legal processes that currently exist for tenants and why rent control is not only important, but necessary. Members and non-members are welcome!

***

ACORN Canada is an independent national organization of low and moderate income families with 51,000+ across the country. We believe that social and economic justice can best be achieved with an active membership focused on building power for change!

Phone: (902) 266 2956
Email: novascotia@acorncanada.org
https://www.acorncanada.org/nova-scotia-needs-rent-control
Video Rating: / 5

Cool Resume images

Check out these Resume images:

California Renovated (Your New Blue)
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Image by cta web
This photo shows the California station after major improvement work as part of the Your New Blue program.

The California station on the O’Hare Branch of the Blue Line recently went through a series of improvements to renew and renovate the 1895 ‘L’ station. The station was essentially gutted and rebuilt, save for supporting structure, building exterior and historical elements that we preserved.

Here’s what was improved:

Station Exterior:
– Upgrade lighting to include LED lights
– Improve signage, wayfinding and other communications
– Installation of public art (installed after completion of station work)

Station House Entry:
– Repainting of elevated structure
– Installation of new lighting on elevated structure to highlight the station’s historic façade
– Replacement of concrete paving
– Installation of new bike racks

Station House:
– Replacement of concrete flooring with granite
– Restore historic masonry walls and entrance canopy
– Renewal of interior wall and ceiling finishes
– Replacement of agent’s booth with prefabricated stainless steel booth

Platform:
– Replacement of wood deck with new wood deck with tactile edge
– Replacement of platform furniture (windbreaks, benches, trash containers, etc.)

When you visit the improved station, take note of the historically sympathetic re-addition of "shepherd’s crook"-style lamps down the platforms and panels, replacing shoebox-type fixtures on bent poles and simple metal L-beam railings.

While the station work is complete enough to have its grand reopening, some minor, finishing touches are being put on the station, including the addition of Train Tracker signs and some additional lighting improvements at platform level, while service to the station has resumed.

Learn more about our Your New Blue project, which is bringing investments to the O’Hare Branch of the Blue Line at yournewblue.com.

Southern Pacific 1518
Resume
Image by Don Burkett
The Southern Pacific 1815 is a diesel locomotive, orginally built in May 1951.

Yes, it started drizzling lightly during the making of this shot.

This is the first my first visit to IRM where dramtic clouds were in the offering. As good fortune would have it, as soon as I got all my equipment packed it stopped, so photography resumed. As bad luck would have it, within a hour the sun burned off the clouds and outdoor photography was over for me.

On the other hand, I’m sure the rest of the patrons were glad for the sunshine.

This was a 5 shot HDR. By itself the resulting image was nicely toned and well balanced.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to create separation between the main subject and the cars on the next track. So I used Detail Extractor on the Locomotive to brighten it a little and pull up detail. I then added Tonal Contrast and added the Graduated Neutral Density filter to the clouds to make them a little angrier. All these filters are in NIK PhotoEfex.

Kimball Track Work
Resume
Image by cta web
Tracks are now being built in the area south of the Kimball station.

The old tracks were demolished, ballast removed, ducts dug up, and now new underground electrical components and lower ballast are in.

Service to Kimball is set to resume early Monday morning after the 9-day closure to make this work possible.

Nice Tenants Rights photos

Some cool Tenants Rights images:

Dundrum – Dublin
Tenants Rights
Image by infomatique
Dundrum is effectively a suburb of Dublin even though it is a town in its own right.

In 1971, Dundrum was one of the earliest locations in Ireland to open a purpose-built shopping centre (the first being in Stillorgan). A much bigger shopping centre opened just south of Dundrum on 3 March 2005. Known as Dundrum Town Centre it contains within the complex one of the largest cinemas in Ireland, opened in early October 2005.

The plans for the old shopping centre includes space for hotels, apartments and more retail outlets. However this has been postponed and the older retail units have been leased to new tenants such as Lidl.

When the Normans arrived in 1169, a series of fortifications were built around Dublin. A castle was built in Dundrum as part of this series of outer fortifications around the 13th century. Later in 1590, a newer castle was built by Richard Fitzwilliam as part of a strategic line of castles within the Pale. The original village clustered around Dundrum Castle and was considered a rural defensive outpost against assaults and raids from Irish tribes and families such as the O’Tooles and the O’Byrnes.

In 1619, a relation by the name of William Fitzwilliam was granted the castle in recognition of his bravery and courage while defending against these assaults and his family held onto the Fitzwilliam seat until 1790. The castle was never reoccupied and exists today as ruins overlooking the Dundrum Bypass and the new shopping centre. Recent excavations in 1989 recovered green glazed pottery known as "Leinster Ware", shells from oysters and cockles, animal bones, and shards of pottery from Saintongue in France probably used for storing wine.

The arrival of Richard Fitzwilliam and the building of the castle established commercial activity in the region. The village was well known for "The Manor Mill" where corn was ground into flour. An overflow waterfall was also used by a paper mill and an iron works.

In 1813, the original Roman Catholic church on Main Street was built. It was replaced by a larger building in 1878 and marked when Dundrum was constituted a separate parish. A large extension was built in 1956. The church is built in a gothic style from Dublin granite with Portland and Bath stone used for the surrounds of windows and doors.

In 1818, Christ Church on Taney Road was opened as a replacement for a smaller church that stood on the same site. Selling pew sites raised funding for the new building, and the sale of 18 pews on the ground and 8 on the gallery raised nearly £400. The architect for the new church was William Farrell. Walter Bourne was born in 1795 in Dublin. He died on 19 Nov 1881 in Taney House. He married Louisa Arabella Minchin in 1821.

The village expanded greatly after the arrival of the Dublin and South Eastern Railway (DSER) in 1854. By 1876, the Manor Mill became a Laundry and was the largest employer of female labour in the region, The Laundry hooter was a regular and well-loved sound in its day, and would sound at 7.50am for thirty seconds, then at 8am to start work, and also at 13.50, 14.00, and finally at 16.50 and 17.00.

In 1893, a Dublin solicitor named Trevor Overend purchased an 18th-century farmhouse. Today, this building is named Airfield House and is open to the public.

The Dun Emer Press was founded at Dundrum by Elizabeth Yeats, assisted by her brother William Butler Yeats, in 1903.

In 1914, a Carnegie Library was opened by the then Lord Chancellor. Originally, the library was used as an entertainment facility for the community and the upper floor was equipped with a stage and even a kitchen. The building was also used as a school until the 1950s.

Senator John C. Calhoun
Tenants Rights
Image by dbking
Cenatoph inscription for Senator John C. Calhoun from South Carolina

John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a prominent United States politician from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. He was the first vice-president born as a United States citizen.

Although he died a decade before the American Civil War broke out between the North and the South, Calhoun was the primary intellectual architect of what would become the short-lived Confederate States of America. Nicknamed the "cast-iron man" for his staunch determination to defend the causes in which he believed, Calhoun pushed the theory of nullification, an extreme states’ rights view under which states could declare null and void any federal law they deemed to be unconstitutional. He was an outspoken proponent of the institution of slavery, which he defended as a "positive good" rather than as a necessary evil. His rhetorical defense of slavery was partially responsible for escalating Southern threats of secession in the face of mounting abolitionist sentiment in the North.

This legacy ties Calhoun to the South Carolina-led Southern rebellion against the federal government, but he spent his entire career working for that government in a variety of high offices in Washington, DC. Calhoun served as the seventh Vice President of the United States, first under John Quincy Adams (1825-1829) and then under Andrew Jackson (1829-1832), but resigned the Vice Presidency to enter the United States Senate, where he had more power. He also served in the United States House of Representatives (1810-1817) and was both Secretary of War (1817-1824) and Secretary of State (1844-1845).

John Calhoun was the son of Scots-Irish immigrant Patrick Calhoun. When his father became ill, the 14-year-old boy quit school to manage the family farm in South Carolina. But he eventually returned to his studies, earning a degree from Yale College in 1804. He was admitted to the South Carolina bar in 1807.

On January 8, 1811, he married his first-cousin-once-removed, Floride Bonneau Colhoun. The couple had ten children over an 18-year period, although three died in infancy. During her husband’s second term as Vice President, Mrs. Calhoun was a central figure in the Petticoat Affair. Two distant cousins were South Carolina Governors Andrew Pickens (governor) and his son Francis Wilkinson Pickens.

In 1810, Calhoun was elected to Congress, and became one of the War Hawks who, led by Henry Clay, agitated for what became the War of 1812. After the war, he proposed a Bonus Bill for public works. In 1817, President James Monroe appointed Calhoun to be Secretary of War after Isaac Shelby declined the nomination. In the election of 1824, no candidate received a majority in the Electoral College; the election was ultimately resolved by the House of Representatives. Calhoun forged an alliance between factions that made John Quincy Adams President and Calhoun Vice President. But he would soon break with Adams, whom he believed unfairly favored Northern interests.

John C. CalhounCalhoun became Andrew Jackson’s running mate in the election of 1828, and again became Vice President. But once again a rift between Northern and Southern views drove a wedge between Calhoun and his president.

Calhoun supported the theory of concurrent majority through the doctrine of nullification–that individual states could override federal legislation they deemed unconstitutional. Nullification traced back to arguments by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in writing the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798, which proposed that states could nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts. Jackson, who believed in a strong federal government, opposed the idea of nullification. The difference, however, between Calhoun’s arguments and those of Jefferson and Madison, is that Calhoun explicitly argued for the state’s right to secede from the Union if necessary, instead of simply nullifying certain federal legislation.

In 1832, the states rights theory was put to the test in the Nullification Crisis after South Carolina passed an ordinance that claimed to nullify federal tariffs. The tariffs favored Northern manufacturing interests over Southern agricultural concerns, and the South Carolina legislature declared them to be unconstitutional.

In response, Congress passed the Force Bill, which empowered the president to use military power to force states to obey all federal laws, and Jackson sent US Navy warships to Charleston Harbor. South Carolina then nullified the Force Bill. But tensions cooled after both sides agreed to the Compromise of 1833, a proposal by Senator Henry Clay to change the tariff law in a manner which satisfied Calhoun, who by then was in the Senate.

During the Nullification Crisis, President Jackson said in a famous toast, "Our federal Union—it must and shall be preserved." In Vice President Calhoun’s toast, he replied, "The Union; next to our liberty most dear!" The humor in this is that Calhoun argued for the Doctrine of Nullification, which had dangerously gone as far as to suggest secession, anonymously, making his true opinions unknown to Jackson. The break between Jackson and Calhoun was complete, and, in 1832, Calhoun ran for the Senate rather than remain as Jackson’s Vice President.

On December 28, 1832, Calhoun accepted election to the United States Senate from his native South Carolina, becoming the first Vice President to resign from office in U.S. history. He would achieve his greatest influence and most lasting fame as a senator.

Calhoun led the pro-slavery faction in the Senate in the 1830s and 1840s, opposing both abolitionism and attempts to limit the expansion of slavery into the western territories. He was also a major advocate of the Fugitive Slave Law, which enforced the co-operation of Free States in returning escaping slaves.

Calhoun couched his defense of the institution of slavery in terms of (white male) Southerners’ liberty and self-determination. And whereas other Southern politicians had excused slavery as a necessary evil, in a famous February 1837 speech on the Senate floor, Calhoun went further, asserting that slavery was a "positive good." He rooted this claim on two grounds—white supremacy and paternalism. All societies, Calhoun claimed, are ruled by an elite group which enjoys the fruits of the labor of a less-privileged group. But unlike in the North and Europe, in which the laboring classes were cast aside to die in poverty by the aristocracy when they became too old or sick to work, in the South slaves were cared for even when no longer useful:

I may say with truth, that in few countries so much is left to the share of the laborer, and so little exacted from him, or where there is more kind attention paid to him in sickness or infirmities of age. Compare his condition with the tenants of the poor houses in the more civilized portions of Europe—look at the sick, and the old and infirm slave, on one hand, in the midst of his family and friends, under the kind superintending care of his master and mistress, and compare it with the forlorn and wretched condition of the pauper in the poorhouse.

Calhoun’s fierce defense of slavery and support for the Slave Power played a major role in deepening the growing divide between the Northern and Southern states on this issue, wielding the threat of Southern secession to back slave-state demands.

After a one year break as Secretary of State, Calhoun returned to the Senate in 1845, participating in the epic Senate struggle over the expansion of slavery in the Western states that produced the Compromise of 1850. But his health deteriorated and he died on March 31, 1850, of tuberculosis in Washington, DC, at the age of 68, and was buried in St. Phillips Churchyard in Charleston, South Carolina.

Calhoun received many honors by subsequent generations after his death, but his legacy as one of the leading defenders of slavery in American history has also rendered him a highly controversial figure.

During the Civil War, the Confederate government honored Calhoun on a one-cent postage stamp, which was printed but never officially released.

Calhoun was also honored by his alma mater, Yale University, which named one of its undergraduate residence halls "Calhoun College." (In recent years some students have called for the residence hall to be renamed, either by dropping the name of the slavery defender entirely or by hyphenating Calhoun’s name with the name of a civil rights leader. Their efforts have not been successful, but the issue flares periodically.) The university also erected a statue of Calhoun in Harkness Tower, a prominent campus landmark.

Clemson University is also part of Calhoun’s legacy. The campus sits on Calhoun’s Fort Hill plantation, which he bequeathed to his son-in-law, Thomas Green Clemson. Clemson’s chief claim to fame, prior to founding the university in his will, was having served as ambassador to Belgium — a post he obtained through the influence of his father-in-law, who was Secretary of State at the time. In 1888, after Calhoun’s daughter had died, Clemson wrote a will bequeathing his father-in-law’s former estate to South Carolina on the condition that it be used for an agricultural university to be named "Clemson." A nearby town named for Calhoun was renamed "Clemson" in the 1930s.

Calhoun is also the namesake for Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama.

In 1957, United States Senators honored Calhoun as one of the "five greatest senators of all time." A 2000 Senate resolution named him one of the "seven greatest" of all time.

Source: Wikipedia

Image from page 178 of “Sport” (1888)
Tenants Rights
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: sport1888brom
Title: Sport
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bromley-Davenport, William, 1821-1884
Subjects: Horses Fox hunting Hunting Fishing
Publisher: London : Chapman and Hall
Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
s a rule, they will be found, ifa Royal Commission was appointed to examine CO VERT-SHOOTING. 157 the details of their discharge of the every-day dutiesof Hfe, to compare favourably with any othersection of mankind. I have spoken my mind freely and without fearon an unpopular subject, of which I have takenthe especially unpopular side. Battues are againstthe spirit of the age, it is said ; so, again, itis said, is the private ownership of land ; so, itmay be urged in the future, is the private owner-ship of a watch. Alter our laws if you will. Letall possession of property be illegal, and curtail itsrights to the limits of the clothing we have onour backs. Annul all contracts, forbid buying andselling, abolish trade. Take from those who haveand give to those who have not, but at leastlet all who have be tarred with the same brush ;and until our laws be so altered, cease from thehypocrisy and spite which attacks not only theworldly possessions but even the amusements ofone class alone.

Text Appearing After Image:
DEER-STALKING bryces bill I HAVE alluded, In my remarks on covert shoot-ing, to the spiteful character of the recentlypassed Ground Game or * Hares and RabbitsAct, which was known before it passed, and hasproved since its passing, to be of no real benefitwhatever to tenant farmers, although very injuriousin the interests of landowners. But that Act hadat all events the pretence of being introduced inthe interest of the tenant farmers, and anyhow therewas a clear motive—political though it was—onthe part of Government in passing it, viz., theplacing iha tenant farmer under an obligation tothe Government by their gift to him of certain M 162 SPORT rights and privileges which had by almost im-memorial custom belonged to his landlord. Butnow a strange Bill with a strange title is presentedto Parliament, called the Access to IMountainsBill, but which might with more accuracy of de-finition have been termed the Destruction toDeer-stalking, Ebullition of Envy, Indulgenceof Ill-nature, Ir

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Production Contract To Rent Or Not to Rent an Office Space

Production Contract – http://www.HowToWriteVideoProposals.com

When deciding to move out of your home office and into an office space, it first has to make sense financially. If you can’t afford it, you absolutely can’t take on the risk of signing a lease for any period of time.

Too many videographers (and business owners as a whole) think that if they simply make the jump, things will work themselves out. Unfortunately, a lot of these people don’t make it. You probably won’t either if you’re numbers don’t support the move.

How do you know if you can afford it?

For starters, if you are having trouble paying your bills every month now, you can’t afford an office space.

If your revenues are up and down, and you never know at the beginning of each month how much money you will generate in the next 30 days, you probably can’t afford an office space. On the contrary, if your revenues are stable each month and have been for a while, moving into an affordable office space is most likely within your reach.

If you believe you are ready, I suggest that you figure out what range you are comfortable paying for rent each month, and save 3 to 6 months in rent before signing a lease. This way, you’ll already have the money in an account to help out if there is ever a period of time when business is slow.

What type and how big of an office should you rent?

Only you can decide what’s best but I suggest you look at the way you currently run your business before making a decision.

For instance, if all your sales meetings take place at the prospect’s location or at a neutral place like a coffee shop or restaurant, consider whether renting a place that has a nice conference room is necessary.

Would people come to your office more if you had the space? Would you be able to rent a nice enough office so that you’d feel comfortable inviting new prospects to meet you there for the first time? I believe that it’s better to meet first time prospects at their place of business anyway. They are more comfortable there and all they can use to judge you by is your work, you as a person and your references. Then, after they become a client, you can invite them to your office space for follow up meetings, review sessions, etc.

Having a conference room as well as an office where you will work can add several hundred dollars to your monthly rent. In selecting my office space, I elected to go without the conference room at this time. My suite is large enough to conduct small meetings but I will continue to schedule sales meetings at my prospects’ place of business. If it ain’t broke, why fix it?

I had no trouble closing deals this way out of my home office, so why should I change my business model just because I have a new commercial office? I shouldn’t and it’s much cheaper not to.

In my opinion, the best way to move out of your home office and into a commercial space is to start small with a short term lease. No more than a year. Rent an office that is just large enough for you to work out of and keep all your gear in your garage. On days when you have a shoot, you can load up at your house and leave from there instead of having to drive to your office first.

As with the conference room, renting extra space just so you can store your equipment can add hundreds of dollars to your monthly expenses. (Additional rent, insurance, etc.)

After you’ve successfully rented a small space for a year or two, determine once again if you can afford an upgrade or if you even need to. Some videographers prefer to have everything under one roof such as equipment, studio, employees, etc.

In a great economy, this can make sense but in a shaky one, it’s dangerous to take on that much in fixed overhead. A small office space with a short term lease and independent contractors instead of full-time employees will help you stabilize profits over the next couple of years.

“Want to learn how to attract more video production clients so you can increase your sales? Discover the art of writing the perfect production contract at http://www.HowToWriteVideoProposals.com!”
Video Rating: / 5

Nice Resume photos

A few nice Resume images I found:

California Renovated (Your New Blue)
Resume
Image by cta web
This photo shows the first riders at the California station after reopening as major improvement work wrapped up in the Your New Blue program.

The California station on the O’Hare Branch of the Blue Line recently went through a series of improvements to renew and renovate the 1895 ‘L’ station. The station was essentially gutted and rebuilt, save for supporting structure, building exterior and historical elements that we preserved.

Here’s what was improved:

Station Exterior:
– Upgrade lighting to include LED lights
– Improve signage, wayfinding and other communications
– Installation of public art (installed after completion of station work)

Station House Entry:
– Repainting of elevated structure
– Installation of new lighting on elevated structure to highlight the station’s historic façade
– Replacement of concrete paving
– Installation of new bike racks

Station House:
– Replacement of concrete flooring with granite
– Restore historic masonry walls and entrance canopy
– Renewal of interior wall and ceiling finishes
– Replacement of agent’s booth with prefabricated stainless steel booth

Platform:
– Replacement of wood deck with new wood deck with tactile edge
– Replacement of platform furniture (windbreaks, benches, trash containers, etc.)

When you visit the improved station, take note of the historically sympathetic re-addition of "shepherd’s crook"-style lamps down the platforms and panels, replacing shoebox-type fixtures on bent poles and simple metal L-beam railings.

While the station work is complete enough to have its grand reopening, some minor, finishing touches are being put on the station, including the addition of Train Tracker signs and some additional lighting improvements at platform level, while service to the station has resumed.

Learn more about our Your New Blue project, which is bringing investments to the O’Hare Branch of the Blue Line at yournewblue.com.

BART service resumes after strike
Resume
Image by Steve Rhodes
BART strike demotix

Some of these photos are available at

www.demotix.com/news/3030327/bart-service-resumes-san-fra…

And at Corbis including

www.corbisimages.com/stock-photo/rights-managed/42-525004…

More photos #bartstrike available at

www.demotix.com/news/2999163/bart-closed-san-francisco-fi…

www.demotix.com/news/2998373/bart-stations-downtown-oakla…

www.demotix.com/news/2994882/lake-merritt-bart-station-oa…

www.demotix.com/news/2994519/striking-unions-rally-lake-m…

#bart #bartstation

Peterborough. The Anglican Church built in 1889. It has been extended several times since then.
Resume
Image by denisbin
Alexander McCulloch took up a pastoral lease in this area in 1850. He held it until much of the area was resumed for closer settlement in 1869. The Hundred of Yongala was declared soon after but settlement did not begin until around 1875. The section where Peterborough now stands was taken up by Peter Doecke in 1875. He sent his niece and her husband from the Barossa Valley to settle the section in 1876. Once the government sent surveyors to determine the junction of the railways from Jamestown and Terowie, Peter Doecke had township allotments surveyed and created a private town in 1880. He called it Petersburg, although this was changed during World War One in 1917 when all German place names were Anglicised or changed. In the same year Doecke sold some land to the government for railway and government purposes and a Post Office was opened in 1880, along with a Telegraph station in 1881, and a railway station in 1881. (The railway reached the town in 1880.) A police station and two hotels soon followed in 1881. Banks, shops and service industries followed, along with churches, and a government school in 1881. There was frenzied activity to establish a major town at this important rail junction. The town developed more once the bill was passed authorising a railway from Petersburg to the SA/NSW border to tap into the silver mines of Silverton ( 1887), and shortly afterwards the silver, lead and zinc mines of Broken Hill. The coming of age of the town was reached quickly with the opening of the Institute in 1884, and the establishment of the town corporation and the opening of the adjoining Town Hall in 1894. The lifeblood of any town was always industry which would provide employment. Although Peterborough had the railways it soon had other significant industries too. The first was the flourmill which opened in 1885 and operated until 1924 when it was converted into premises for freezing rabbits and for producing ice. A cordial factory was established in 1894 and operated until 1976 when the factory was burnt down. The cordial factory had various owners over the years, and after a visit by the Governor in 1899 it was granted Vice Regal approval. In the early days from 1899 until 1915 another factory produced temperance drinks, relishes and Worcestershire sauce.

Given the town was just outside Goyder’s Line it is somewhat surprising that Peterborough had a butter factory from 1898 until well into the 1930s. Butter was exported to England. Milk was supplied to the factory from a wide area including Orroroo, Hallett and Hammond from over 100 suppliers. It was usually sent by rail to Peterborough, and often came from properties with only one or two cows which were hand milked. The town also had its own printing works from 1887 to produce a local newspaper. Papers for Orroroo and Quorn were also printed in Peterborough. The printing works surviving until 1970 when all operations were taken over by the printers in Port Pirie.

Peterborough was also special in that the government established a Gold Battery in the town in 1897, with an attached cyanide works. In the first six years of operation the battery produced 61,000 grams of gold with most of it coming from the goldfields near Oodlawirra and Dawson. Ore from across the state was still being sent to Peterborough works in the 1980s. The cyanide plant was closed down in 1954. The gold battery is controlled by the National Trust, more as a museum piece, than a fully operating gold battery but it does still operate. It is the only gold battery in South Australia.

The Union Church which opened in 1879 was used by Methodists and Presbyterians. A tin Wesleyan Church was opened in 1880, but a stone church was not finished until 1884. The Baptists opened their first church in Peterborough in 1883 and it was added to several times. Once the Wesleyans and Baptists had their own churches, the original Union Church was re-dedicated as the Anglican Church in 1884. The Anglicans later built a new church which was opened in 1889.Further additions and enhancements were carried out over the next thirty years. This church was in the Diocese of Willochra which was created in 1915 with bishops being enthroned in the Port Pirie or Port Augusta church. The first bishop in 1915 resided in Peterborough in rented premises for two years before moving to Gladstone. The Presbyterians did not establish regular services after the initial period of 1879, until 1900 when they began planning their own church. They held services in the Town Hall until their church was completed in 1903. The congregation was always small and the church closed in 1918, with the building being converted to a residence in 1922. The Lutherans in Petersburg started their first services in 1877. A church (St Peters) was built in 1885 and a Lutheran school started soon afterwards. Dwindling numbers forced the day school to close in 1912 but the government would have forced its closure during World War One anyway.

The Catholics in Peterborough built the first church, St Sebastian’s three miles outside of the town with the first priest arriving in 1884.( This church was later demolished.) In 1884 the first Catholic Church in the town was opened and dedicated to St Anacletus with an attached day school with seven pupils. Tenders were called for a new church in 1890 and the formal opening was held in 1892. This became one of the largest buildings in the town after extensive additions in 1916 as it was then the Pro-Cathedral for the Diocese of Port Augusta. Nearby the convent school was opened in 1923 and operated until 1973. In 1912 work started on a two storey Bishop’s Residence, designed by Bishop Norton himself. The massive stone residence of fourteen rooms, complete with new electric light from a private generator, was finished in 1913. It had extensive stables, out buildings and a large surrounding stonewall. Peterborough was to be the focal point of the diocese of Port Augusta. Bishops resided in the house until 1952 when the diocese was changed to the diocese of Port Pirie and the Bishop’s Residence was shifted to Port Pirie as is the cathedral. Bishop’s Palace is now known as St Cecelia’s and operated as a private bed and breakfast establishment

14, 16 and 18 Friar Street, Worcester

Some cool Tenants Rights images:

14, 16 and 18 Friar Street, Worcester
Tenants Rights
Image by ell brown
Shops in an old tudor building on Friar Street in Worcester.

Including: Trend of Worcester (right), Charmane of Worcester (centre) and Mark A Linley: Goldsmith (left). There is also a Beautique shop here as well.

At 14, 16 and 18 Friar Street in Worcester. Grade II* listed.

WORCESTER

SO8554NW FRIAR STREET
620-1/17/284 (West side)
22/05/54 Nos.14, 16 AND 18

GV II*

2 houses, now 3 shops with salon over south and centre bays.
Numbered right to left, described left to right. North and
centre bays (Nos 14 and 16) originally one dwelling, probably
for John Watters, c1526-1544; southern bay (No.18) probably
c1536-75; with later additions and alterations including
outshut to rear at south probably late C17 and restorations of
1956 and shop fronts c1980s. Timber frame with brick and
stucco infill, plain tile roof, old tiles to front with
replacements to rear.
PLAN: (Nos 14 and 16) originally a single, two-bay structure,
the north bay slightly larger, with cross passage between in
centre bay, then to south a single-bay dwelling, three bays
deep, with cross passage at south. Now U-form with range at
rear north (right) extended.
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys, with attics to outer gables, 3 bays.
Jowled posts at ground-floor to cross passages and between
dwellings. First-floor is jettied, the bressumer beam is now
in 3 parts; close studding to first floor and to attic at
south, to centre and north parts there is an additional mid
rail and to south bay a bressumer over first-floor;
ground-floor now occupied by shop fronts. Northernmost cross
passage has rectangular framing. 3 replacement casement
windows on brackets and with leaded lights. To south ( No.18)
a continuous cornice on brackets over first-floor. South gable
has similar 3-leaded-light casement window with continuous
timber sill on brackets and 2-light casement window to north
gable. Ground-floor: replacement shop fronts have multi-paned
windows and glazed entrances. Cambered-arched opening to cross
passage at south, further cross passage has straight-headed
lintel and panel of carved decoration over with quatrefoils
and mouchettes. Roof dormer on south return.
INTERIOR: partition walls have large panels of square and
rectangular framing and close studding; jowled posts to first
floor; diagonal and arch braces; chamfered beams at rear,
south with lamb’s tongue stops. Clasped purlin roof to centre
and north bays, similar roof to south bay. To north bay, first
floor are 2 panels of painted decoration (probably mid-late
C16) with scrolling foliate motif ‘found and restored 1956’.
HISTORICAL NOTE: the gable to north bay is a later addition as
originally this dwelling had a simple roof parallel to
the street, without dormers or gables. Nos 14 and 16
(originally one house) belonged to John Watters "paynter",
526-44; Gyles Taylor lived there in 1660 when the house is
recorded as having 5 hearths; by 1678 Richard Roberts was the
tenant (he became a Quaker); then Thomas Biddle; by 1741 when
it was sold by the Wyldes, the property had been divided at
the rear into 3 cottages and a frontage.
Friar Street originated as a rear access lane for buildings on
High Street until the foundation of the Franciscan Friary in
1235. The first friary buildings occupied the stretch between
Nos 11-25. The south end of the street as developed first,
with plots dating from the mid C14, plots at the north end
date from the early C15. Many of the existing houses date from
the Reformation, the Friary having been suppressed in 1539 and
its property sold by the Crown to the Corporation of Worcester
which demolished much for building materials. Building
continued from c1540 onwards, modifications were made to
houses during the C17, whilst the C18 saw the replacement of
several of the older buildings. The street was inhabited
mainly by tradesmen: weavers, clothiers, brewers and
innkeepers; during the C17 Friar Street hosted a concentration
of non-conformists, especially Quakers.
(Hughes P and Molyneux N: Friar Street: 1984-: 32-33; The
Buildings of England: Pevsner N: Worcestershire:
Harmondsworth: 1968-1985: 328).

Image from page 345 of “Strawbridge & Clothier’s quarterly” (1882)
Tenants Rights
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: strawbridgecloth02stra
Title: Strawbridge & Clothier’s quarterly
Year: 1882 (1880s)
Authors: Strawbridge & Clothier
Subjects: Department stores Mail-order business Clothing and dress Fashion Home economics Clothing and dress Consumer goods Dry goods
Publisher: [Philadelphia : The Company]
Contributing Library: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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lied from cottagehomes. You can just imagine what effectall that had upon me—a managing woman,on the look-out for something agreeable todo that paid well. Here was the very thing.When I set my mind to do anything, I ambound to carry it out, and I took hold ofthe bird business in just that spirit. Now, all my life I had heard how muchbetter one worked when they had a heartin the business; but I never really and trulyappreciated that saying until I began raisingcanaries. It is just the business for a wom-an : increases her womanly tenderness anddevelops her motherly instincts. It is mar-velous to see that fragment of life go sys-tematically through with her preparationsfor house-keeping, and her management ofthe family when it arrives. I might go ontalking as long as Cousin John did, but Iam afraid you would get weary and wonderwhen I was coming to the point, and tellyou what I know about raising canaries. Well, when I came into possession ofwhat was to be my bird-room, I first had it

Text Appearing After Image:
FIG. 2.—TIN NEST-FRAME.- thoroughly cleaned, so that its last ownerwouldnt have known it; and then I had itweather-stripped, to make it free from alldraughts. Next, I had a carpenter comein and build me a large thirty-two-couplecastle, in two sections. I set up a stove inthe centre, on top of which I kept a basinof water, to keep the air moist. At theend of the room I placed other cages, andhad there a general repository for variousbird-necessaries. Just glance at the picture that I hadtaken, and you will see the whole arrange-ment. Notice the closet on the right-hand;that is amoulting-place, and is used in win-ter as a large flight in which to turn thebirds loose. When I got the bird businessfairly going, I used to slip in softly and takethat chair you see in the corner, and watchthe birds. Let me give you facts and figures, so thatyou will not think this is a fairy story. Justas Cousin John furnished them to me, I willfurnish them to you. When my bird-roomwas ready for its tenants

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Image from page 89 of “Scottish geographical magazine” (1885)
Tenants Rights
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Identifier: scottishgeograph21scotuoft
Title: Scottish geographical magazine
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: Scottish Geographical Society Royal Scottish Geographical Society
Subjects: Geography
Publisher: Edinburgh, Royal Scottish Geographical Society
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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r.On the landward side of the heather there are several woods of Scotspine and birch, some of which have been planted, but, as pointed outby Robert Smith (1900 A) many seedlings from these can be found onthe moor. 72 SCOTTISH GEOGRAPHICAL MAGAZINE. Tentsmoor and the Sands of Barry are still at the present timefairly primitive dunes. Yet here small farms have long been establishedon the central inland parts, and crops of oats, rye, carrots, and potatoesgrew well. Within recent years these farms have mostly been laiddown in grass. The tenants have also grazing rights on the dunes,and sheep have played a part in producing the present vegetation; theyare probably the chief factor in determining the scarcity of heather onthe dunes generally. This plant is, however, much more abundant thanmight be gathered from a casual examination. Towns and villages havealso encroached on the inland parts of the fixed dunes. The golf linksof St. Andrews, Elie, Monifieth, Carnoustie, and Montrose are fixed

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Fig. 12.—Teutsmoor, near the Point. A drain with marsh vegetation. The background is heather-covered fixed dune. (Photograph by Robert Smith.) dunes, and this use tends to foster the grass association, while heatherand swamp are almost suppressed. (3) Vegetation of Muddy Shores.—The conditions necessary for thedeposition of mud are eddying currents, by which the finer particlesseparated from the coarser sand are deposited under still-water con-ditions. The mud-flats are almost always found near the mouth of aninflowing stream, and not far from sand-dunes. They are also moreextensive in the tidal estuary of a large river like the Tay than on theopen coast of the North Sea. Typical, but not large, examples occurnear the mouth of the Eden at Guardbridge; in the Tay estuary wherestreams enter at Tayport, Balmerino, Kingoodie, and Invergowrie; andin the Montrose Basin. The vegetation of the muddy salt marsh isdistinct from that of the sand-dunes. Near Tayport, between Tents-moor and a

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Nice Resume Writing photos

A few nice Resume writing images I found:

Image from page 182 of “[Reports]” (1903)
Resume writing
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Identifier: reports9190miss
Title: [Reports]
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Missouri. Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources
Subjects: Geology Mines and mineral resources
Publisher: Rollo [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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ed below the clay pocket, keeping a general eastand west direction. I have carefully examined the location of these shallow dig-gings and with a few exceptions they are confined to the area overwhich the Bonneterre dolomite is the surface rock. Seldom werethese shafts sunk through any considerable thickness of Davisshale and on this as well as on other lands in the district carefulmapping of these ancient diggings would serve to locate approxi-mately the contact between the Bonneterre and Davis formations. To write the history of early mining on this property as wellas to compile a record of production, distinct from that of theother mining properties of the district, would require more timethan is at my disposal. Attention, however, should be called to thefact that the deposits of lead exploited by these shallow mines, werevery rich and that the aggregate annual production should bethought of in terms of millions of pounds. This land was first prospected with a diamond drill in 1876,

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FEDERAL LEAD CO. Ill at which time some ore was encountered at a depth of 240 feet.A company was organized to develop the property but the attemptat that time was unsuccessful. However, in 1890, the companybegan sinking a shaft and at the same time resumed prospectingwith a diamond drill. In May 1892 the shaft reached the ore bodyat the 242 foot level and upon this some drifting was done. In themeantime the diamond drill prospecting disclosed a richer andmore extensive ore body at a depth of from 360 to 380 feet and itwas decided to sink the shaft to this level. This shaft, the Cen-tral, now Federal No. 6, was completed during the Summer of1893. The first production was in 1894. Shaft No. 7, formerlyknown as the Rogers, was completed and in operation in 1901.From 1894 to 1904, when the Central Lead Company sold out tothe Federal Lead Company, the total production, including thatfrom the Theodora, was 38,700 short tons of concentrates valued atover three millions of dollars. The collar

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Olivia Chow’s Community Art Project – Screwed Out of Our Share
Resume writing
Image by Tania Liu
We paid our taxes, but what happened to our money? The Conservative Minister John Baird told Toronto to “f-off”, then he said no to new streetcars. Toronto has been "screwed out of our share of " 0 million.
Express yourself: put screws into a 24’x4’ word SCREWED, made from wood. Write about what the federal government should share with you or the city on a 24’x4’ word SHARE on a canvas.
Olivia will display our work on Parliament Hill when it resumes on Sept 14.

tenement+iv, 1984+½ (2009)
Resume writing
Image by zyphichore
With the first "verse" now finished and the rest at about 50%, I think I can actually see this personal project being completed! I’m pretty excited with the "pair up" of this with the photographic series (same name and theme, but on canvas 🙂 With that, I will be resuming my "kraft dinner" budget and trying to spend my fabrication of time a bit more wisely.. Baby steps! 🙂

On an enthusiastic note, if you are an artist with similar influences/interests thinking about quirky projects (2009-2010) to collaborate on please drop me a line.. Likewise, if you ever find yourself "across the pond" in the new year I would be more than happy to introduce you to one or two galleries and personalities that you might get along with!

Cheers!

you can watch one of the recent trailers here:
www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=53185316211
or on youtube:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aIGNV8VEjI

tenement+iv, 1984+½ (2009) is the film/video accompaniment to the photographic series 1984+½:
www.flickr.com/photos/zyphichore/2687486977/


Shot in four countries, between 2005 and 2008, tenement+iv is the fourth experimental urban documentary by visual artist Leigh Anthony DEHANEY. As with his gallery work, he continues to conceptually explore themes of retro-futurism, apocalyptic titanism, communication and the nihilistic.

Many of the psycho acoustic soundscapes were initially constructed by Dehaney during 2003-2006 while attending the Alberta College of Art + Design in Canada.


credits

narration:
Linda Klementova

music written and performed by
Corey Dolen
Rodney Guitarsplat
Vladislav KlouÄek "Master G"
Brad Laner
Igi Papan

soundscapes, stills & editing
Leigh Anthony Dehaney


Artist Profile:
Canadian artist Leigh Anthony Dehaney’s background is a mixture of fine arts and technology. After graduating from Mount Royal College with an Arts and Science Diploma Dehaney obtained his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the University of Calgary. In 2003 he was accepted into the Alberta College of Art + Design where he was drawn towards Media Arts & Digital Technologies. Best known for his visual work, Dehaney’s influences often include constructivist architecture, industrial ruins, painted dumpsters, vintage technology, and mechanical systems. Dehaney’s personal practice/gallery work often depicts portraiture within a derelict and contaminated world, much of which has been largely influenced by unmarked visits to industrial Cuba and Eastern Germany. His visual artwork and experimental videos have been exhibited and featured both locally and internationally, most notably with CBC’s Arts Review (Canada), Gabrichidze Gallery (Brussels), Shufflesome (Germany), Jones Soda Co. (USA), and Fotofest (USA). Professionally Dehaney consults as a “graphics dude” through his company Dravenfield Ltd. founded in 2004. Currently he spends his free time documenting industrial/urban environments in Eastern Europe and is working on his next experimental short flick “tenement+iv, 1984+½”, which he hopes to have completed by May 2009.