Image from page 15 of “Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana” (1894)

Some cool Job Training In College images:

Image from page 15 of “Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana” (1894)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: biennialreportof3614mont
Title: Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction
Subjects: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction Education
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : Independent Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Montana State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Montana State Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ach-ers has caught up with the needexcept in certain fields. These areparticularly in home economics,commercial science, girls physi-cal education, music and voca-tional work. Obviously, however,we need to continue training highschool teachers in order to beready to take care of the increas-ing number of elementary studentsby the time they reach high school. Montana is not alone among thestates in this matter of emergencyor sub-standard certificates. Wefind that practically all states inthe past year issued such cer-tificates. Of the total certificates issued in one state, 34.5% were emergency or sub-standard cer-tificates. Montanas percentage was 12.6% while that for Oregon was 14.6% and Idaho 13.8%. In order to gain and maintain certification, teachers are required to continue with their train-ing. This means they must spend many summers attending universities and colleges. Some haveobjected to the standards set up for certification as being too much a matter of credits and degrees.

Text Appearing After Image:
Practice Teachers at Work—W.M.C.E. -14- However, a close examination of this indicates that it is the only objective way in which teachers can be placed in certain categories. It is not so much to store up vast amounts of knowledge and methods of teaching by attending college at intervals, but rather because such attendance gets teachers out of a rut and serves as an inspiration and a method of securing more confidence in what they are doing. There is nothing more pitiful or harmful than a teacher who has gone stale on the job. Training and Certification During 1951-52 Montanahad 1704 high schoolteachers, 217 principalsand superintendents, 2,600elementary city and townteachers, 860 one-roomteachers and 236 two-room teachers. Of thehigh school teachers, 1,253had Bachelors degrees,394 had Masters de-grees, while three had Ph.D. degrees. Of these sameteachers 555 held life cer-tificates, 1,020 had regularsecondary certificates, 81held special certificatesand 48 held emergency certifica

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 645 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
als. Paid—Was not always looking for in-formation. Jones—Attended to his own affairs. Schmincke—Quit growling. Mt. Clare Yard Correspondent, J. F. Te.^rney To Yard Clerk E. L. Brennan belongsthe distinction of being commended for hisprompt action in averting property damageand possible loss of life on the WesternMaryland. On the morning of August 19, at 12.04a. m., after being notified by phone to stopthe trains, Brennan jumped from a high re-taining wall to the Western Maryland tracksbelow, and waved the signals which broughtthe trains to a stop. Efficiency means greatsavings, and Eugene is doing his bit. We are all glad to see our old friendHenry George, veteran track foreman,back on the job again. A recent sicknessgave him quite a seige. He claims, never-theless, to have lost none of his prestige asa pinochle player, and cheerfully invites allcomers at anytime. Mt. Clare Yard is still at the top incars handled per month in the BaltimoreTerminal; for September, 29675 being the

Text Appearing After Image:
Left: Standard method of protecting highway crossing by the use of flashlight signals, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Lansdowne, Md.Upper right: No. t) passing Lansdowne. Lowei right: Engine of No. 506. Note the absence of smoke Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, November, 1923 63

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

NHTI Advanced Machine Tool and Robotics Engineering Teaching Labs and Programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
NHTI advanced machine tool and robotics engineering teaching lab and program staff and students. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

Comments are closed.