Image from page 505 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)

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Image from page 505 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
Job Training In College
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp07balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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oung couple willmake their future home. Clarence Grimes, a life-long employe of theBaltimore and Ohio, died at his home here onJuly 8, after a long illness. He was born inthis city sixty years ago and spent his entirelife here. At an early age he entered theemploy of the Company and served contin-uously until ill health interfered with hisactive service. For the past four years he hasbeen an invalid and for the last year confined tohis bed. He suffered from a complication ofdiseases which medical skill could not relieve.Blad, as he was known by the railroad men,was a conspicuous figure about the local yardwhere he served so long an apprenticeship. Hewas always greatly interested in anything forthe good of the Company and popular with theemployes. He was a charter member of thelocal lodge of our Veterans and much inter-ested in its welfare. Blad was a man of finecharacter, a consistent member of the FirstU. B. Church, where the funeral service washeld. A widow and one daughter survive.

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Peter J. Burner, Baltimore and Ohio engineer,died at his home on East King Street, after anillness of over two years, at the a^e of sixty-three. He was born at Luray, Va., m 1856, butwhen a young man came to Martinsburg andentered the employ of this Company. Laterhe was promoted to engineer, in which capacityhe served for thirty years, until he suffered astroke of paralysis two years ago from which henever fully recovered. A recent attack of thedisease caused his death. His widow survives. Keyser Correspondent, H. B. Kight, Ticket Clerk C. E. Littleton, a carpenter in foremanSponsellers gang, was taken to BaltimoreAugust 5 to undergo an operation. On Novem-ber 27, 1918, he completed a job along the lineof road and in order to get back to Keyserearly, boarded a freight train. In boarding it,he bruised his leg, but did not pay any atten-

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Image from page 884 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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f theyhad taken a perfectly good apple out ofyour lunch and put in a wax one—such agood imitation that you even went so faras to attempt to eat it—right in front ofall the fellows, too. There are a few things we would like tosee in and around the Master MechanicsOffice, and especially the following: .■nne and Jim quit razzing each other. John quit talking about May. Alary in on time. Harry have an extension from the phoneplaced on his desk. Rider quit asking when he iscalled to thephone— Who is it? R. M. Stock—get a little peace to dictate. Glad to see H. G. Graffious, terminaltrain master, back on the job after a shortsick spell; also Terminal General ForemanS. A. Irwin. This is a bad time to getsick, fellows, watch your foot! Monongah DivisionCorrespondent, Ann.v Mary UnksThe ticket agent at the Baltimore and()]iio Railroad Station at Grafton, W. Va., is the most courteous, polite and amiableofficial in that capacity that I know and Ido quite a bit of travcUng. This is :t

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THE SOUTHERN BALTIMORES NEWEST ANDMOST MODERN HOTEL imtm -lis % i iru :i Jlftist mention our magazine when vriling advertisers Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, January, IQ24 statement made by a prominent Elkins manat an informal dinner which he and a num-Ijer of Grafton men attended here. Ihave been in Grafton a number of times andhave had occasion to ask this ticket agentquestions with reference to trains and otherinformation. At times when I asked thesequestions he was busy as a bee. But healways answered me pleasantly and with asmile. I dont know the mans name, butI tell you he is a most valuable asset to theBaltimore and Ohio. I have heard peopleall over the state of West Virginia say thesame thing that I am saWng about theman at the ticket window in Grafton. Ifthere were more courteous employes of pub-lic ser-ice corporations in this state andthroughout the country there would be amuch better feeling between the corpora-tions and the general public. Courtesy andservice with a smile

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