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OPPORTUNITY THROUGH SERVICE: 143D ESC PROMOTES ARMY RESERVE AT ORLANDOJOBS.COM CAREER FAIR
Job Training In College
Image by 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)
ORLANDO, Fla. – Soldiers from the 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) engaged with thousands of job seekers during a career fair conducted Nov. 18, 2016, at the Amway Center in Orlando, Fla.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tarshekia L. McNear, operations noncommissioned officer, 143d ESC, and Army Sgt. Eddie J. Washington, logistics NCO, 143d ESC, collaborated with members of the Army Marketing Research Group, Florida A&M University Army Reserve Officer Training Corps and local recruiting battalions to educate their resume-wielding guests about the hundreds of career opportunities open to the U.S. Army’s enlisted and officer corps. McNear and Washington shared their first-hand knowledge and experience serving in the Army Reserve with scores of candidates who seek to serve their country on a part-time basis.

Hosted by Orlandojobs.com, the fair comprised almost 100 employers who attracted more than 3,000 applicants living throughout Orange, Brevard and Volusia counties. As the largest Army Reserve unit in Central Florida, the 143d ESC continually seeks self-motivated men and women in the local area to train, lead and mentor Soldiers.

The career fair is one of the many Army-sponsored events connected to the Florida Classic, one of America’s largest college football rivalry featuring two historically black colleges: Bethune–Cookman University and Florida A&M University. McNear, Washington and other 143d ESC Soldiers will actively participate in these community engagement activities leading up to the Nov. 19 kickoff at Camping World Stadium in downtown Orlando.

Photos by Sgt. John L. Carkeet IV, 143d ESC

#GoArmy
#Armyexperience
#Armyteamtampa

OPPORTUNITY THROUGH SERVICE: 143D ESC PROMOTES ARMY RESERVE AT ORLANDOJOBS.COM CAREER FAIR
Job Training In College
Image by 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)
ORLANDO, Fla. – Soldiers from the 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) engaged with thousands of job seekers during a career fair conducted Nov. 18, 2016, at the Amway Center in Orlando, Fla.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tarshekia L. McNear, operations noncommissioned officer, 143d ESC, and Army Sgt. Eddie J. Washington, logistics NCO, 143d ESC, collaborated with members of the Army Marketing Research Group, Florida A&M University Army Reserve Officer Training Corps and local recruiting battalions to educate their resume-wielding guests about the hundreds of career opportunities open to the U.S. Army’s enlisted and officer corps. McNear and Washington shared their first-hand knowledge and experience serving in the Army Reserve with scores of candidates who seek to serve their country on a part-time basis.

Hosted by Orlandojobs.com, the fair comprised almost 100 employers who attracted more than 3,000 applicants living throughout Orange, Brevard and Volusia counties. As the largest Army Reserve unit in Central Florida, the 143d ESC continually seeks self-motivated men and women in the local area to train, lead and mentor Soldiers.

The career fair is one of the many Army-sponsored events connected to the Florida Classic, one of America’s largest college football rivalry featuring two historically black colleges: Bethune–Cookman University and Florida A&M University. McNear, Washington and other 143d ESC Soldiers will actively participate in these community engagement activities leading up to the Nov. 19 kickoff at Camping World Stadium in downtown Orlando.

Photos by Sgt. John L. Carkeet IV, 143d ESC

#GoArmy
#Armyexperience
#Armyteamtampa

Image from page 66 of “Smith Alumnae Quarterly” (1921)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: smithalumn2122alum
Title: Smith Alumnae Quarterly
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Alumnae Association of Smith College
Subjects: News by/about College alumnae
Publisher: Alumnae Association of Smith College
Contributing Library: Smith College Libraries, College Archives
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
osition which, in designing and in constructing with a living,changing medium, she is only able to begin. I said when I started my training, I refuse to be a misfit. If I find some-thing I like and can do better in the way of a vocation, though my hair is whiteand my steps tottering Ill claim it. Well, there is yet time, but so farhere I am. West of Boston and New York, at least, there is still an uncrowdedfield of labor. I may sit at my typewriter making out bills and O. K.ing othersfor someone else to pay. I may consult with the most charming of clients.For six months of the year I may spend a part of every day out in the openmeasuring and staking and talking Ital-English with Mike and Tony andJoe, and when .11 the rest is done I can put in the bright colors and the finishingtouches with my own hands, and watch the whole thing grow and improve aslong as the client and I shall remain friends! Who has a more alluring job orone with such infinite varietv of occupation within its scope?

Text Appearing After Image:
The ex-Russian Chapel, now the auditorium of Uie New York Smith Clubhouse IS IT A SUCCESS, THE SMITH CLUB ON STUYVESANT SQUARE? That is the question people are asking about the New York Clubhouse. There are threeanswers, all in the affirmative: Seventy-five per cent of the rooms are rented on yearly leases, running from October toOctober. The remaining 25 per cent are taken on monthly leases or by transients. Transienttrade has outgrown the number of rooms allotted to its use and people away on vacations oftenarrange with the management to sublet their rooms. The famous cubicles have proved bothcomfortable and popular. The moral of this is: write ahead. The Smith Club Realty Corporation paid interest on its bonds in July and expects to do soin January. It expects to pay off the second mortgage within the year. Rents have been reduced once already, a reduction amounting to 83- per cent on yearlyleases. A certain number of bondholders are waiving their interest in order that the rent of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Cool Job Training In College images

A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

New trades education facility opens at Camosun College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
The 7,432-square-metre trades education facility at Camosun College that will provide students on Vancouver Island with more opportunities to train for in-demand careers, has officially opened.

Read more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0014-000261

Connecting Aboriginal learners in the Thompson Okanagan to in-demand jobs
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
The Nicola Valley Institute of Technology (NVIT), Okanagan College and the University of Victoria (UVic) and eleven Aboriginal communities in the region are creating six program partnerships that will help prepare 141 Aboriginal learners for a career in the skilled trades.

news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0005-000112

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Canada and BC invest in new trades training centre at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
A .21M investment in a new Trades Training Centre at the Vernon campus of Okanagan College will create jobs, put students first and support skills.

The funding will support the construction of a new 1,250 square-metre facility, which will address a shortage of available trades training shops in the region by providing a purpose-built space on campus.

Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson and Vernon-Monashee MLA Eric Foster made the announcement during a visit to the Okanagan College Vernon campus.

news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0122-002459

DSC_5106
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN ANNOUNCES
MINECRAFT COMPETITION WINNERS
Highlights STEM accomplishments,
proclaims STEM Day in West Virginia

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (November 29, 2016) – After proclaiming today STEM Day in West Virginia, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin announced the student winners of the State Capitol Minecraft Design/Build contest. This contest was a collaborative effort involving the Governor’s STEM Initiative, the West Virginia Department of Education, the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts and the Education Alliance.

The competition, which began in May, was open to West Virginia students, grades PreK-12 and challenged participants to either create a new version of the state capitol building or produce a replica of the current complex using Minecraft. Governor Tomblin recognized both individual and team winners from each category.

"I applaud each student who took the time to create their own versions of our state capitol," said Gov. Tomblin. "More than once this summer, I saw students exploring the capitol grounds, taking notes and preparing for the hours they would spend creating their submissions. Their efforts certainly paid off. It’s important that we encourage our students to develop the skills and interests that build a foundation for future success in STEM fields – into college, training programs and careers."

The students recognized today received more than ,100 in gift cards to be used for educational purposes. In addition, Microsoft is providing a Surface Pro 4 to each of the top two winners for each category-Asad Ranavaya from Cabell Midland High School in Cabell County and Justin Hardwick from East Fairmont High School in Marion County.

Before the student recognition ceremony, Governor Tomblin hosted a roundtable discussion with state and education officials, along with students, to highlight the efforts and successes of his STEM Council and STEM Initiative.

"There is a critical need to focus our state’s attention on science, technology, engineering and mathematics," said Gov. Tomblin. "West Virginia’s workforce needs are evolving and in order to fill jobs in the future, all of us – from K-12, higher education, and workforce and economic development – must work together to provide our students access to the best STEM education opportunities."

The Governor STEM Council was established to develop specialized STEM education opportunities for West Virginia students and increase the number of graduates in these fields. The council is comprised of business and education leaders across the state.

The following students were recognized today by Governor Tomblin:

Benjamin Reed, Village of Barboursville Elementary School
Zane Spencer, Cherry River Elementary School
Camdyn Hill, Terra Alta/East Preston Middle School
Madison McCloud, Madison Middle School
Elizabeth Shaf, Charleston Catholic High School
Jensen Tucker, Grafton High School
Austin Ballenger, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Gabe Coleman, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Ian Morrison, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Savion Myers, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Jackson Stewart, Washington High School
Jacob Thrasher, Washington High School
Matteo Cerasoli, Washington High School
Asad Ranavaya, Cabell Midland High School
Justin Hardwick, East Fairmont High School

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

DSC_4146
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Governor Tomblin, Senator Manchin, Community College System, Employers Join In
Dedicating New, Innovative North Central Advanced Technology Center

Fairmont, W.Va. (October 31, 2016) – The second of two state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Centers (ATC) in the state was dedicated today, when Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin cut the ceremonial ribbon celebrating the opening of the 65,416 square-foot, two-story, multi-faceted training facility to host customized workforce development and events at the I-79 Technology Park.

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin comments centered on how partnerships bring about positive changes in our state. “Here in West Virginia, we need a technically-skilled, highly-trained workforce. We need higher education and business and industry to work hand-in-hand. And we need to look around the corner to new innovations and opportunities that will make our state economically strong and competitive for the long haul,” said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. “Today, as we dedicate this state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Center, these innovations and opportunities are all around us. In these classrooms, our students will have the best technology at their fingertips and the opportunity to gain in-demand skills for the jobs we know need filled. As they earn their credentials and start their careers, their families and communities will be stronger – and our state’s future will be brighter.”

“Strengthening West Virginia’s Community and Technical Colleges is something I have been passionate about since my time as Governor,” U.S. Senator Joe Manchin said. “Today’s announcement is a testament to the CTC system, state and local officials, business investors and students who have worked together to advance these programs. The North Central Advanced Technology Center will help innovate our workforce training programs for West Virginia’s businesses and increase our students’ achievement.”

The West Virginia Community and Technical College System (WVCTCS) shepherded construction of both new ATCs (the South Central ATC in South Charleston was dedicated on August 19, 2014) through state-supported initiatives to help provide employers with well-trained, technically advanced workers. The North Central ATC, managed by Pierpont Community & Technical College, offers contemporary classrooms and ample laboratory space for programs such as Applied Process Technology, which includes three pathways (Advanced Manufacturing, Energy Systems Operations and Instrumentation and Controls); Petroleum Technology; Laboratory Assistant; Electric Utility Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; and Health Information Technology. Through collaborative partnerships and private support, the ATC will play an essential role throughout North Central West Virginia in providing the latest technologies, programs, and expertise to increase regional economic growth; focusing on job creation; fostering economic development; and encouraging more students to enter Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.

The concept of authorizing and funding the two ATCs to serve the state’s growing workforce training challenges emerged when Governor Tomblin was West Virginia Senate President and Senator Manchin was Governor. “For our employers to be competitive and our citizens to gain much-needed skills, the Mountain State must be able to have the advanced facilities to produce a highly educated technical workforce,” said Pierpont Community & Technical College President Johnny Moore. “The new ATC in Marion County will be a tremendous asset – a world-class facility offering quality educational programming allowing our workers and employers to be competitive in a global market.”

“Pierpont’s new North Central Advanced Technology Center is needed to prepare students for careers in an expanding technology industry which is poised for growth in West Virginia. By providing quality workforce-training and educational opportunities through its challenging programs, this new facility will contribute to the success of this institution and its students,” said Senator Capito.

Leaders from energy, chemical, healthcare, emergency management and information technology industries are taking advantage of the ATC’s spacious, private and technologically-diverse features.

One such partner is FirstEnergy Corporation. Holly Kauffman, President of West Virginia Operations for FirstEnergy, sees benefits in partnering with Pierpont. “Our partnership with Pierpont is a successful example of how business and education can work together to create opportunities for our next generation to be successful right here in West Virginia,” said Kauffman.

Community and technical colleges in the Mountain State and nationwide are being counted on for leadership in improving energy innovation, advanced manufacturing and healthcare technology fields, as skill needs are rapidly changing and technology in the workplace is becoming more prevalent. To build capability, the West Virginia Community and Technical College System and its industry partners are competitive in pursuing federal training dollars and using flexible state resources such as the “earn and learn” program. Recent federal grant successes include the million “Bridging the Gap” award, a .2 million award for training dislocated workers, and a million TechHire award.

“By 2020, sixty-five percent of jobs will require some form of postsecondary education,” said WVCTCS Chancellor Sarah Tucker. “It’s imperative that we increase accessibility to community and technical education, so that we can supply a highly skilled workforce for our current employers and attract new businesses to our state. The completion of the second Advanced Technology Center will give more West Virginains the opportunity to get the education needed for high-paying, high-demand careers.”

The Governor, Senate Manchin and guests took a tour of the facility to learn more about the programs and state-of-the-art equipment housed at the ATC. Faculty and students were on hand for demonstrations and to respond to questions.

The West Virginia University Army ROTC color guard presented the colors and Rev. D. D. Meighen, retired pastor at Central United Methodist Church, offered the invocation. Property for the North Central ATC was donated by the High Tech Foundation.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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Lakes Region Community College Advanced Manufacturing and Electronics/Electromechanics teaching lab and programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
Lakes Region Community College advanced manufacturing and electronics/electromechanics manufacturing teaching lab, equipment, staff and students. Unless otherwise noted, CC BY mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

Canada and BC invest in new trades training centre at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
A .21M investment in a new Trades Training Centre at the Vernon campus of Okanagan College will create jobs, put students first and support skills.

The funding will support the construction of a new 1,250 square-metre facility, which will address a shortage of available trades training shops in the region by providing a purpose-built space on campus.

Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson and Vernon-Monashee MLA Eric Foster made the announcement during a visit to the Okanagan College Vernon campus.

Learn more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0122-002459

Image from page 1036 of “Carpenter” (1911)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: carpenter31unit
Title: Carpenter
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
Subjects: Carpenters — Labor unions — Periodicals McGuire, P. J. (Peter James), 1852-1906 Duffy, Frank, 1861-1965
Publisher: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
JohnR. Burgess, s – Hoboken ave., Jersey City. New York—Pcesl.r;nt, T. M. Guerin, 290 2dave., Troy, N. Y.; secretary, Chas. Fiesler,508 E. 86th St., Nen York City. Northwest State Council—President, P. W.Dowler, 910 S. Ninth St., T.ncoma, Wash.;secretary, J. F. Weatherby, 863 E. ShermanSt., Portland, Ore. Oklahoma—President, T. H. Clark, Tulsa,Okla.; secretarv-treasurer, F. A. Davis, 921W. 23d St., Oklahoma City, Okla. Rhode Island—President, R. B. Scott, 35 New-port ave., Newport, R. I.; secretary, M. E.Sanborn, 182 Glenwood ave., Pawtucket.R. I. Texas—President, R. S. Greer, BeaumorTex.; secretary, J. E. Proctor, 833.Colubian St., Houston, Tex. On the healtliy life of the women andchildren of the working class the hope offreedom rests. T. R. Y. our simple method of finding cuts forall kinds of roofs easily for 25 cent coin.Books of all kinds for wookworkers.We teach mechanical draving:, try us. PEERLESS SCHOOL OF BEVELS 710 CLEVELAND AVE. NEW CASTLE, PA. 58 TH E CARPENTER

Text Appearing After Image:
Do You Want This Job? It Pays This Foreman0 a Month There are thousands of just such jobs awaiting the trained man. Inevery section, in every state, and in every city there are factories to besuperintended; machinery to be repaired; railroads to be built and main-tained; residences and business blocks to be erected; canals, cuts, andtunnels to be dug; or dams and power plants to be constructed. Who should be in charge of this work? YOU. Who should receive the high salaries paid for such work? YOU. Who should qualify to successfullyhandle this work? YOU. The progress of this age is not goingto stop, and some one must do thiswork. Will it be you or the otherfellow? One thing is certain: it willbe the man best qualified for the job. Let us help you to qualify for abigger job. What we have done fortens of thousands of others we can dofor you. You need only mark and mail theattached coupon and you will receive,without obligation or cost, full infor-mation about any position in whichyou

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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Manchester Community College Automation and Robotics/Mechatronics teaching lab and programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
Manchester Community College robotics and automation/mechatronics teaching lab. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

Canada and BC invest in new trades training centre at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
A .21M investment in a new Trades Training Centre at the Vernon campus of Okanagan College will create jobs, put students first and support skills.

The funding will support the construction of a new 1,250 square-metre facility, which will address a shortage of available trades training shops in the region by providing a purpose-built space on campus.

Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson and Vernon-Monashee MLA Eric Foster made the announcement during a visit to the Okanagan College Vernon campus.

Learn more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0122-002459

DSC_4345
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS
FAREWELL ADDRESS TO STATE LEGISLATURE
CHARLESTON, W.VA. (January 11, 2017)-Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today
delivered his farewell address to the West Virginia Legislature in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex after serving six years as governor and a total of 42 years in public service in the Mountain State.

Information on Gov. Tomblin’s accomplishments during his six-year
administration can be found here.

See below for the speech as prepared for delivery:

Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, members of the Board of Public Works, justices of
the Supreme Court of Appeals, members of the Legislature, distinguished guests, and my fellow West Virginians, I stand before you today, after six years in the Governor’s office and 42 years in this grand statehouse, with a deep sense of gratitude and reflection and an equally profound hope for West Virginia’s future.

Public service has anchored my life’s work-from a young 22-year-old in this very House chamber, to a desk across the hall in the State Senate, the Senate President’s podium for 17 years and now as your 35th Governor.

It has been the greatest honor-and the greatest reward-to serve the people of this state that we all love. Together, we have put West Virginia first and moved our state forward-even in the midst of tough times, including far-reaching economic shifts, budgetary challenges and historic natural disasters.

West Virginians are strongest in the toughest times. We come together. We lift each other up. And we don’t just hope for a better future; we fight for it.

ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION & JOB CREATION
Working hard is exactly what we’ve done over the past six years to create new economic opportunities for the Mountain State.

We have all seen the dramatic impact of the coal industry’s decline in our state. We’ve seen thousands of jobs lost. Families and communities struggling. People beginning to lose hope.

But I believe in-and have fought to reach-the light around the corner.

Shortly after becoming Governor, I pledged to go anywhere and meet with anyone to grow our state’s economy. Across West Virginia, the country and the globe, we have succeeded.

Last year, global giant Procter & Gamble announced it would build its first U.S. manufacturing facility since the 1970s right here in West Virginia in the Eastern Panhandle. This will ultimately be a half-billion dollar investment in the Mountain State and result in hundreds of new jobs.

P&G chose our state after an exhaustive search of many others. And as numerous companies have discovered, I know they will find it to be the best decision they’ve ever made.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing West Virginia, which recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, has expanded continuously-nine times, in fact.

Today, Toyota employs more than 1,600 people. And the company has invested .4 billion since 1996.

Manufacturing jobs, like those at P&G in Martinsburg and Toyota in Buffalo, will be among the most critical to our state’s economic future.

In my time as your Governor, I have fought for jobs like these and many more. From Amazon in Huntington and Macy’s in Berkeley County, to Bombardier Aerospace manufacturing in Harrison County-which just in November announced an expansion of 150 jobs.

Companies are finding that when they invest in West Virginia, it pays off.

In fact, since 2011, West Virginia has seen more than billion in new investments, spanning 275 projects. We have welcomed more than 60 new companies and secured 215 competitive expansion projects.

Over the past six years, investment projects have reached 22 industries and provided West Virginians with more than 12,000 good-paying jobs.

Right here in the Kanawha Valley, we have one of the best examples of that remarkable progress.

Gestamp has grown beyond the bounds of any of our expectations. Since opening in 2013, Gestamp has tripled production and more than doubled its workforce, now employing nearly 900 West Virginians.

I know that one of the fundamental reasons behind their growth has been our ability to transform workforce training in West Virginia for the better.

STRENGTHENING WORKFORCE TRAINING & EDUCATION
For example, the Learn and Earn program which we launched in 2012, gives our community and technical college students classroom instruction and hands-on work experience simultaneously. These students earn a competitive salary while giving employers a cost-effective way to recruit and train new employees.

Joe Atha is one of these students. A former coal miner, Joe is now a student at BridgeValley Community and Technical College where he is also supporting his family by earning a wage through the Learn and Earn program at Gestamp.

Joe is here today with his wife, Rita. Please stand to be recognized… along with Dr. Sarah Tucker, Chancellor of our Community and Technical College System.

Through forward-thinking programs like this, we can make a real, lasting difference for West Virginians.

That’s why I personally convened the West Virginia Workforce Planning Council, which has helped us break down bureaucratic silos and better align classroom learning with the workforce needs of our businesses and industries.

We’ve even started that process in high schools through the Simulated Workplace program.

Today, our career technical education classrooms have been transformed into businesses. Medical classes are now clinics. Hospitality programs are now catering businesses and restaurants.

And instead of just going to a welding or carpentry class, our students are now part of a construction company, complete with job foremen and safety inspectors.

Just last month, we celebrated a heartwarming moment as a result of the hard work of more than 2,000 of these students from 12 high schools across the state.

Together with the Department of Education’s Career Technical Education division, the West Virginia National Guard and our Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, we presented keys to tiny homes that were designed and built by these students for survivors of the historic floods that hit our state last June.

REBUILDING FROM NATURAL DISASTERS
Time and again, in the aftermath of this tragic flooding we have seen the selflessness of West Virginians make a difference for one another.

The "Big Hearts Give Tiny Homes" project was a shining example of that West Virginia spirit-one that made an overwhelming difference for 15 families impacted by the flooding, including Brenda Rivers from Nicholas County, whose home was a total loss in the flooding. Brenda now lives in a new tiny home built by students, including Chance Ballard from Spring Valley High School in Wayne County.

Please join me in welcoming Brenda and Chance … along with Dr. Kathy D’Antoni … whose visionary leadership at the Department of Education has made Simulated Workplace the success it is today.

Working hand-in-hand with the federal government and local officials, our immediate response to the flooding was quick and effective. We were able to expedite federal assistance to our communities and families in need. And over the past seven months, we have been able to shift our focus to long-term recovery.

Through a public-private approach, we launched the RISE West Virginia program, which in total has provided nearly million to 230 small businesses in the flood-impacted counties-funding that is helping them reopen or continue operations and keep fueling our local economies.

I would like to thank, once again, West Virginia native and champion Brad Smith-the CEO of Intuit, one of the world’s leading financial software companies-and his wife Alys for their family donation of 0,000, which gave the RISE program its first, needed boost.

West Virginia has experienced more than its share of disasters during my time as your Governor-this historic flooding, the Derecho, Hurricane Sandy, Winter Storms Thor and Jonas and the water crisis.

Through it all, we have grown stronger, we have improved our emergency response capabilities and we have strengthened public safety.

Adversity demands resilience. That’s what we have shown in these challenges and many more-including one of the most trying epidemics I believe the Mountain State has ever faced-with the sharp rise in substance abuse and addiction.

FIGHTING SUBSTANCE ABUSE
That’s why in 2011, I issued an Executive Order to create the Governor’s Advisory Council on Substance Abuse, made up of representatives of substance abuse prevention, behavioral medicine, law enforcement, child and adolescent psychology, the legal system, residential treatment facilities, the public school system, the faith community and health care.

My vision for this Council was a community-driven, ground-up approach to tackling this epidemic. Through community-based task forces in six regions across the state, we have made significant progress and enacted life-saving reforms.

We now look at substance abuse as an illness-not a crime.

We have decreased the number of meth labs across the state as the result of making it more difficult to obtain pseudoephedrine.

We have expanded access to the life-saving drug Narcan to first responders and family members of those struggling with addiction. Last year alone, hundreds of lives were saved as a result.

We have substance abuse prevention services in all 55 counties. We have expanded and improved community-based treatment options and recovery services. Across the state, we have 188 crisis detox beds in residential treatment facilities with more sites under development.

We have 118 beds designated for youth and postpartum treatment as well as short-term and long-term residential treatment. And we have over 1,000 beds for those seeking help and support through peer and provider recovery homes and facilities.

We are working closely with our prisons and correctional facilities to ensure all West Virginians are provided access to substance abuse rehabilitation.

In fact, the Division of Corrections operates nine residential substance abuse treatment units in correctional centers across the state and we have expanded this model to our regional jail facilities as well.

And-through Justice Reinvestment-we have successfully worked to address substance abuse, which is the root cause of many crimes.

Because of that work, we have expanded drug courts, substance abuse counseling and greater supervision after release.

And ultimately, we have better controlled incarceration rates, which prevented our state from having to build a new 0 million prison that was projected to be needed because of our previous rising prison population.

Just this week, we announced the news that West Virginia reached settlements with two additional drug wholesalers totaling million, which resolves allegations by our state regarding the distribution of controlled substances in West Virginia.

This brings the total amount of drug settlement money paid to our state by drug wholesalers to million, which will expand our efforts even further for more law enforcement diversion options, more treatment recovery services and many more efforts to fight this epidemic.

I am also deeply proud of the work we have done in creating the state’s first 24-hour substance abuse call line, 844-HELP-4-WV, which has received nearly 8,500 calls since it launched in September 2015.

The help line provides referral support for those seeking help and recovery services. It’s an opportunity for people who are struggling to talk with someone who cares, get connected to treatment options and begin the road to recovery.

No caller is ever placed on hold and they are immediately connected with treatment staff representing the best and most appropriate treatment options for them.

Administered by First Choice Health Systems of West Virginia, the help line is staffed by certified professionals, many who have overcome addiction themselves and want to help others turn their lives around as well.

One young gentleman I met did just that because he picked up the phone.

A.J. Walker, a recovering alcoholic and addict, was given the help line number by his brother.

A.J. said when he called, he was treated like a person-not like a drug addict-and he found hope. They got him into a detox facility and into recovery, and the help line staff called and checked in on him every step of the way.

Today, A.J. is employed by the treatment facility that helped him and he’s in school studying to become a substance abuse counselor.

A.J. is here today with his brother, Andrew, and Vickie Jones … Commissioner of our Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities.

A.J. we are so proud of you. And today … you are giving hope to so many.

When I hear stories like A.J.’s, I am incredibly optimistic for West Virginia’s future. With economic changes, job losses and families struggling, we have to seize every opportunity before us to become stronger as individuals and as a state.

One such opportunity lies in Boone and Lincoln Counties, where I believe we have the chance to revitalize Southern West Virginia and make the Mountain State stronger.

EMBRACING THE FUTURE
It was here in this chamber, one year ago during my State of the State Address, where I announced plans for the largest development project in West Virginia’s history at the former Hobet surface mine site.

Since last year at this time, we have worked every day and we have made tremendous progress on this project, which is now known as Rock Creek Development Park.

We have worked with local landowners, who are generously donating land that will result in more than 12,000 developable acres for Rock Creek, which is the size of the city of Huntington.

The West Virginia National Guard-Rock Creek’s first tenant-is on the ground with newly-expanded operations for maintenance work and training.

And we have a long-term strategic plan now in place, which looks at demographics and market trends to help us identify the best investment opportunities for Rock Creek.

For generations, our coal miners, workers and their families have kept West Virginia strong. Now, it’s our turn to help them.

By realizing the full potential of Rock Creek Development Park for job creation and economic diversification, we can build up a region of our state hard hit by the downturn in the coal industry.

My vision for Rock Creek started many years ago as I rode my four-wheeler around the hills of Southern West Virginia and saw the possibilities that such an enormous site-with such a great amount of flat land-could have.

Embracing opportunities like this takes careful thought and planning, and this public-private project will require some investment by the state. But I believe wholeheartedly that the returns will vastly exceed our investment.

That isn’t something I say lightly.

Throughout my 42 years in public service, fiscal responsibility has been at the heart of every project I’ve undertaken, every policy I’ve fought for and every decision I’ve made.

GOVERNING RESPONSIBLY
As a result of much hard work, over the years we have decreased taxes, embraced responsible spending, made great progress toward paying off the state’s unfunded liabilities and controlled growth of the state’s budget.

We have realized milestone tax reforms, including progressive elimination of the food tax, saving West Virginians 2 million each year.

We have gradually eliminated the state’s business franchise tax and decreased the corporate net income tax-changes that make West Virginia more attractive for business investments.

As a result of responsible reforms, last year the National Council on Compensation Insurance filed the 12th reduction in workers’ compensation premiums in 12 years. And West Virginia employers have seen a savings of more than 2 million since we privatized the program in 2006.

We addressed our Other Post Employment Benefits by dedicating million annually to pay off the billion unfunded liability, which was caused by previous promises that became too expensive to maintain.

As I did last year, I present to you today a budget that is balanced, but a budget that requires difficult decisions and thinking about the next generation rather than the next election.

I continue to be proud of the fiscal responsibility we have shown not just for the past six years, but over the last generation. Our commitment to paying down our long-term liabilities has not wavered and we have responsibly reduced taxes on both our employers and our employees.

Because of our improved fiscal policies, we have been able to refinance bonds that pay for schools, water and sewer lines, college campus improvements and roads to save more than 0 million in the past six years.

So when people ask me why I’m so concerned with maintaining our Rainy Day Fund and our bond rating, that’s why. It means more schools, more roads and more homes with clean water.

As part of tough decisions during tough economic times, we have cut more than 0 million from our budget in the past five years. While we all continue to hope that the coal industry will rebound, that hasn’t happened quickly and it likely won’t ever return to the levels that we once saw.

We continue to work to diversify our economy and I know the improvements we’ve made will pay long-term dividends in job growth and investment.

But we’re not there yet, and part of being fiscally responsible means making sure that we can pay our bills without taking the Rainy Day Fund to dangerously low levels or cutting services to the point where we cannot care for our people or educate our students.

Therefore, the budget I present to you today includes a 1 percent increase in the consumer sales tax to raise 0 million and elimination of the current sales tax exemption on telecommunications services-a move that would make our system the same as 80 percent of the country.

I understand these taxes will not be easy, but asking people to pay a few dollars more now is a far better choice than seeing PEIA cards not accepted by medical providers or going back to the days when we couldn’t finance school and road improvements, or even pay the gas bill at the Governor’s Mansion.

I urge you to consider these responsible actions to balance the budget until the brighter economic picture that we all expect comes into focus.

CLOSING
I believe the thing that compelled each of us to public service is our love for West Virginia. And that is the very thing that should compel us to work together.

When I became your Governor, I said that we must put West Virginia first.

That’s what we have done. And I encourage you to continue working together out of that deep devotion to our beloved state-in the coming year and beyond.

I am proud of the work that we have accomplished. I look forward to the leadership of Governor-elect Jim Justice and I thank all of you who have worked with me over the years.

I thank my cabinet members and agency directors. And I thank my dedicated staff members who have worked every day-not for me, but for the people of West Virginia.

It has been the honor of my life to be your Governor-to be West Virginia’s Governor. Joanne and I thank the people of West Virginia for your abiding trust, counsel and support.

And we look forward-with the greatest hope and optimism-to an even stronger West Virginia.

Thank you. God bless you. And God bless the great state of West Virginia.
###

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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DSC_9225 sos
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS

Address highlights top priorities and key pieces of legislation

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (January 13, 2016) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today delivered the 2016 State of the State Address in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex.

Gov. Tomblin’s remarks included an overview of new programs and initiatives related to his top priorities as governor, as well as a number of new pieces of legislation he plans to introduce during the 2016 Legislative Session.

Since becoming governor in November 2010, Gov. Tomblin has focused on issues such as workforce development, combatting substance abuse, responsible fiscal policies and job creation. Following are highlights from the State of the State speech and other legislative initiatives of Gov. Tomblin.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Gov. Tomblin has worked to create a positive business climate now and for decades to come, and he remains committed to working with business and industry leaders from a variety of industries to create new investments and bring jobs to West Virginia. Companies from across the nation and around the world are noticing the changes the state has made, and nationally and internationally recognized companies – including Macy’s Amazon, Quad Graphics, Hino Motors, Diamond Electric, Toyota and Procter and Gamble – have chosen to locate, expand and invest in West Virginia.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin added another company to the list of those that have committed to West Virginia. During the address, Gov. Tomblin announced polymer additive manufacturer Addivant has decided to stay and expand operations in Morgantown, saving nearly 100 jobs and adding at least million in new investments and additional opportunities for employment.

While these large investments are a vital part of West Virginia’s long-term success, Gov. Tomblin is also committed to ensuring small business owners have a chance to excel and grow. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced the Self-Employment Assistance Act, designed to make it easier for unemployed West Virginians to get the help they need to open a business. The act allows entrepreneurs to continue receiving unemployment benefits while establishing their new business. This helps owners reinvest in their new venture and employees, while also providing a steady source of financial support for their families.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In working to bring new investments and create jobs, Gov. Tomblin has also made it a top priority to ensure these jobs are filled by skilled and well-trained West Virginians. With the help of his Workforce Planning Council, Gov. Tomblin has established new workforce development programs and strengthened existing initiatives to meet the needs of business and industry operating here. The state has received more than million in federal grant funding to support Workforce West Virginia operations across the state, helping coal miners, their families, and those who have exhausted their unemployment benefits find careers in growing industries.

Through a collaborative partnership among business, industry, education and labor leaders, Gov. Tomblin has established a new Regional Job Matching Database, an online source for both educational program listings and employment opportunities available close to people’s homes. This database will help match students with training programs in critical needs areas and connect them with employers seeking those same skills.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin also plans to introduce legislation that will expand the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ (WVDHHR) Temporary Assistance to Need Families (TANF) pilot program. Through a partnership with the WVDHHR and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, the pilot program was designed to help West Virginians already receiving TANF benefits enroll in college courses, get access to financial aid and work with advisors to begin a new career path to support themselves and their families. With this program expansion, more West Virginians will receive the help and support they need to become productive, successful members of their local communities.

STRENGTHENING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

Gov. Tomblin has dedicated much of his public service to supporting West Virginia’s coal miners and their families. In recent years, both the state and nation have experienced unprecedented downturns in this industry, adversely affecting local operations and devastating the lives of many hardworking West Virginians.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin highlighted ongoing efforts to support and strengthen all those affected by the downturn in the coal industry. The state has submitted an application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), seeking more than 0 million in funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. This competition has the potential to help Boone, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, McDowell and Wyoming counties adjust, adapt and advance their communities. If successful, funding will be allocated to help repair and rebuild aging infrastructure, promote land use planning and hazard reduction efforts and stimulate housing and economic development in the region.

Gov. Tomblin tonight also announced plans to develop of the largest industrial site in West Virginia history – the former Hobet surface mine in Boone and Lincoln counties. At 12,000 acres, this property is large enough to fit every major economic development project in recent history – with thousands of acres left over. The state is working in partnership with local landowners, Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund to find ways to re-develop this site and diversify southern West Virginia’s economy.

ENERGY

In working to ensure West Virginia’s energy sector is strong and diverse, Gov. Tomblin has also worked hard to support development of West Virginia’s abundant Marcellus, Utica and Rogersville shale formations. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin stressed the need to create the processing and pipeline infrastructure necessary to ensure this industry’s continued growth now and for years to come, highlighting major investment projects such as the Columbia Gas Mountaineer Xpress pipeline.

Gov. Tomblin also announced that while the Department of Environmental Protection continues to work on a feasibility study related to the state’s Clean Power Plan Submission, it’s likely that plan will include items such as reforestation and replacement of boilers to improve the efficiency of existing coal-fired power plans.

TACKLING SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Gov. Tomblin has made combatting the state’s substance abuse epidemic a top priority of his administration. As communities and families across West Virginia continue to battle substance abuse from a number of fronts, Gov. Tomblin has invested a significant amount of time and funding to strengthen community-based treatment options and programs to give those struggling hope and get them on the road to recovery.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to support ongoing substance abuse efforts. He announced new licensing requirements for Suboxone and Methadone clinics, requiring medication-assisted treatment facilities to provide comprehensive therapies in coordination with medication to help to treat the root causes behind addictions, rather than simply supplying a short-term fix.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to expand the Opioid Antagonist Act of 2015, making opioid antagonists, such as Narcan, available to any West Virginian without a prescription. This new legislation requires pharmacists to train those who receive this drug on how to administer opioid antagonists and helps the state track those receiving Narcan to help better focus state resources in areas hardest hit by opioid overdoses.

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Gov. Tomblin’s juvenile justice reforms have also made a significant impact on our state’s youth, as he has worked to improve outcomes for those currently in the juvenile justice system and provide early-intervention care to at-risk students to keep them in the classroom and out of the courtroom. During his address, Gov. Tomblin touted the success of 2015’s Juvenile Justice Reform, specifically highlighting positive results of the truancy diversion program.

He also announced the Division of Juvenile Services has reduced the number of kids being sent to out-of-home placements by more than one-third and reduced the number of detention beds by more than 40 percent. So far the state has saved million, and the Division of Juvenile Services is confident West Virginia can double that savings in coming years.

EDUCATION

Ensuring students remain in the classroom for 180 days of learning is just one of Gov. Tomblin’s education priorities, as he is equally committed to ensuring West Virginia’s education system stands ready to provide students with the thorough and efficient education they deserve. In addition, they should receive new learning opportunities that supply the skills and hands-on experience they need achieve long-term success in West Virginia.

To improve upon West Virginia’s educational offerings, Gov. Tomblin has created the Innovation in Education Grant Program, which will not only supply students with special skills and hands-on training, but will also give them the opportunity to compete among their peers on a national and world-wide scale. This new program is designed to reward teachers and schools in West Virginia for innovation and creativity in the classroom. The reallocation of .8 million in existing West Virginia Department of Education money will support new classroom offerings that are designed to help students develop and gain these skills in high-demand fields, such as science, technology, engineering, math and entrepreneurship.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

Throughout his administration, Gov. Tomblin has made sure to enact and uphold fiscally responsible policies. He understands the state is experiencing significant budget challenges, but remains committed to making difficult choices now that will help ensure West Virginia has a bright future now and for years to come.

Gov. Tomblin tonight introduced legislation to pay off West Virginia’s old workers’ compensation debt more than a decade ahead of schedule. This also will remove additional severance taxes on coal and natural gas industries earlier than anticipated, providing much-needed relief for energy businesses struggling with low prices.

In helping to ensure West Virginia’s tax base is both stable and diverse, Gov. Tomblin tonight also proposed raising the state’s tobacco tax by 45 cents to a total of a pack. This increase will not only help discourage West Virginians from smoking or using tobacco products, it will also provide .5 million annually to support health-related costs. million of this revenue will help fund PEIA, ensuring public employees do not see the dramatic benefit reductions initially proposed.

Gov. Tomblin also proposed legislation to eliminate a sale tax exemption that will bring our state’s telecommunications tax in line with 41 other states across the country. This legislation will place the same 6 percent sales tax on cell phone and phone line usage and generate million annually.

With these proposed changes, the 2017 budget Gov. Tomblin presented uses no money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and in fact predicts surpluses beginning in 2019.

Gov. Tomblin will also introduce the following pieces of legislation:

Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Reporting Update

Updates current West Virginia code to reflect 2014 federal law for compliance and continuation of federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Authorizes information sharing by Workforce West Virginia with the state agencies responsible for vocational rehabilitation, employment and training to better align the workforce system with education and economic development in an effort to create a collective response to economic and labor market challenges on the national, state and local levels.

West Virginia Workforce Development Board Updates

Updates the composition of the West Virginia Workforce Investment Council and changes its name to the West Virginia Workforce Development Board to comply with WIOA.

Borrowing from Rainy Day for Unemployment Compensation Fund

Authorizes borrowing in amount up to million to provide additional funds for unemployment compensation.

Controlled Substances Monitoring Program (CSMP) Update Bill:

Requires practitioners (doctors, pharmacists and others) to register for the CSMP to obtain or renew a license.

Creates an administrative fine of ,000 for failure to register for the CSMP, as well as an administrative fine of 0 for failure to access the CSMP as required.

Certificate of Need Exemption for Out-Patient Behavioral Health Community-Based Services

Exempts community-based behavioral health care facilities, programs or services from the certificate of need process contained in W.Va. Code 16-2D-1 et seq.

811 – One Call System

Makes underground pipelines of 4" in diameter and greater subject to "call before you dig" reporting if not otherwise required by state or federal law. Applies to gas, oil or any hazardous substance pipelines.

Membership in 811 requires an entity to provide mapping data indicating where their underground pipelines are located and to respond within the specified time periods when notified by the 811 administrator and be able to mark its underground pipes.

15 Minutes Rule

Requires that drilling, production and pipeline activities are subject to the state’s 15-minute emergency notification law (WV Code 15-5B-3a (b)(1)).

Provisions apply to emergency events that involve a death or serious injuries, unplanned ignitions, fires or explosions and similar serious emergency events (confirmed emergencies) at drilling, production and pipeline sites.

Notification must be provided within 15 minutes to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and include preliminary information regarding the nature and extent of the emergency event, any existence or non-existence of threats to public health, substances involved or released and designated principal contact information.

Transportation Network Company Bill (TNC) – Uber/Lyft

Authorizes TNCs to operate in West Virginia by obtaining a permit from DMV.

Requires automobile insurance and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

Requires a zero tolerance for drug and alcohol policy.

Requires TNCs to have a nondiscrimination policy and comply with nondiscrimination laws.

Office of Coalfield Community Development Bill

Continues the Office of Coalfield Community Development in Commerce (previously in Division of Energy)

Air Ambulance Bill

Provides air transportation or related emergency or treatment services providers operating in West Virginia from collecting more for service from PEIA covered persons than the currently allowable Medicare reimbursement rate.

Repeal Behavioral Health Severance & Privilege Tax

Eliminates the behavioral health severance and privilege tax and limits the sales tax exemption on durable medical goods to those purchased for home use only.

The change is believed to be revenue neutral and will help ensure continued federal matching funds for Medicaid and Medicare.

Reduce Required Annual Severance Tax Deposit to Infrastructure Bond Fund

Reduces the amount of severance tax proceeds deposited into the West Virginia Infrastructure General Obligation Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service on such bonds from .5 million annually to an amount equal to annual debt service, not to exceed .25 million annually.

Personal Income Tax update

Updates the Personal Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws

CNIT Update & Revised Filing Date

Updates the Corporate Net Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws.

Intermodal

Terminates funding of the Special Railroad and Intermodal Enhancement Fund beginning January 1, 2016. The source of funding is corporate net income taxes.

Racetrack and Historic Hotel Modernization Funds Cessation

Ends the Licensed Racetrack Modernization Fund and Historic Hotel Modernization Fund and moves all funds currently in such funds to the General Revenue Fund.

Cessation of Deposit into Road Fund from Sales Tax for FY2016

Eliminates for fiscal year 2016 the deposit of sales tax proceeds into the State Road Fund from sales of construction and maintenance materials acquired by a second party for use in the construction or maintenance of a highway project.

Such sales tax proceeds will be deposited into the General Revenue Fund in lieu of the State Road Fund.

State Aid Formula Changes

Eliminates the Growth County School Facilities Act, which allowed growth county boards of education to designate general fund revenues from new construction (increasing property taxes) for placement in a growth county school facilities act fund.

Adjusts the formulas for the foundation allowance for both professional educators and service personnel.

Adjusts and eliminates certain adjustments to the foundation allowance for transportation costs (increasing bus life from 12 to 15 years and mileage from 180,000 to 225,000 miles).

Adjusts the calculation for the foundation allowance to improve instructional programs.

Eliminates certain restrictions in the computation of the local share applicable to growth county schools.

Infrastructure Fund Excess Lottery Deposit Reduction

Decreases the annual deposit of Excess Lottery revenues to the Infrastructure Fund from million to million for fiscal year 2017.

Increases the percentage of funds that may be disbursed from the Infrastructure Fund in the form of grants from 20% to 50% for fiscal year 2017.

SBA Deposit Reduction

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the annual deposit of sales tax proceeds into the School Building Authority’s School Major Improvement Fund from million to million (was reduced for FY16 to million).

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the School Building Authority’s School Construction Fund from ,216,996 to ,216,996 (was reduced for FY16 to ,216,996).

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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OPPORTUNITY THROUGH SERVICE: 143D ESC PROMOTES ARMY RESERVE AT ORLANDOJOBS.COM CAREER FAIR
Job Training In College
Image by 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)
ORLANDO, Fla. – Soldiers from the 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) engaged with thousands of job seekers during a career fair conducted Nov. 18, 2016, at the Amway Center in Orlando, Fla.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tarshekia L. McNear, operations noncommissioned officer, 143d ESC, and Army Sgt. Eddie J. Washington, logistics NCO, 143d ESC, collaborated with members of the Army Marketing Research Group, Florida A&M University Army Reserve Officer Training Corps and local recruiting battalions to educate their resume-wielding guests about the hundreds of career opportunities open to the U.S. Army’s enlisted and officer corps. McNear and Washington shared their first-hand knowledge and experience serving in the Army Reserve with scores of candidates who seek to serve their country on a part-time basis.

Hosted by Orlandojobs.com, the fair comprised almost 100 employers who attracted more than 3,000 applicants living throughout Orange, Brevard and Volusia counties. As the largest Army Reserve unit in Central Florida, the 143d ESC continually seeks self-motivated men and women in the local area to train, lead and mentor Soldiers.

The career fair is one of the many Army-sponsored events connected to the Florida Classic, one of America’s largest college football rivalry featuring two historically black colleges: Bethune–Cookman University and Florida A&M University. McNear, Washington and other 143d ESC Soldiers will actively participate in these community engagement activities leading up to the Nov. 19 kickoff at Camping World Stadium in downtown Orlando.

Photos by Sgt. John L. Carkeet IV, 143d ESC

#GoArmy
#Armyexperience
#Armyteamtampa

Manufacturing Tour Highlights Oil and Gas
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
A firsthand look at BC’s oil and gas sector: The Northern Lights College Oil & Gas Centre of Excellence in Fort St. John is visited by Parliamentary Secretary for the BC Jobs Plan to the Minister of Jobs, Tourism, and Skills Training, Greg Kyllo and MLA for Peace River North, Pat Pimm.

As part of their manufacturing tour, they’re visiting local companies and highlighting how the BC Jobs Plan and BC Skills for Jobs Blueprint supports manufacturing in the region.

LEARN MORE: engage.gov.bc.ca/bcjobsplan/?s=manufacturing

Canada and BC invest in new trades training centre at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
A .21M investment in a new Trades Training Centre at the Vernon campus of Okanagan College will create jobs, put students first and support skills.

The funding will support the construction of a new 1,250 square-metre facility, which will address a shortage of available trades training shops in the region by providing a purpose-built space on campus.

Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson and Vernon-Monashee MLA Eric Foster made the announcement during a visit to the Okanagan College Vernon campus.

Learn more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016AVED0122-002459

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A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

Downtown London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Image from page 118 of “Smith Alumnae Quarterly” (1921)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: smithalumn2122alum
Title: Smith Alumnae Quarterly
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Alumnae Association of Smith College
Subjects: News by/about College alumnae
Publisher: Alumnae Association of Smith College
Contributing Library: Smith College Libraries, College Archives
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
fall we are openinga department of training, so those of you whocare to, come along! I warn you that we haveadopted the policy of discharging volunteersquite a£ freely as we do paid workers if theyare not satisfactory, and of promoting themwhen they are. Amita Fairgrieve writes: I dont knowwhat Miss Jordan would say if she knew thenew job Ive tackled. Im editing Love StoryMagazine, the new Street and Smith publica-tion—the first issue appeared July 25. (Per-haps this notice ought to go among the births!)I shall be glad to have any modern Mary J.Holmeses or Bertha M. Clays communicatewith me either by letter or interview. Theyare our Shakespeares. Im having a wonder-ful time, am very enthusiastic about thework, and only hope Ill be able to swing it.1913 Class secretary—Mrs. Alexander Craig Jr.,41 Clarkson Av., Brooklyn, N. Y. Married.—Marion Hines to Dr. LeonardLock, Sept. 23. Dr. Lock is on a fellowshipof the National Research Council at Chicago, THE SMITH ALUMNAE QUARTERLY 85

Text Appearing After Image:
For The Trip A Nourishing Fruit ConfectionFrom The Garden of Eden ^,——_. Sold only in Dust-proof packages IB^^^-E^lCT*$ DROMEDARY DATES ?;}BSE3l!EiS The Mary Marguerite Tea Room and Food Shop 21 Siate Street Luncheon and Supper, Hours 11 to 6:30 A ccommodations made for special luncheonand dinner parties ORDERS TAKEN FOR ALL KINDS OFHOME-COOKED FOODS (< BIDE-A-WEE The Chicken andWaffle House Mrs. L. M. Stebbins, Hadley, Mass. Tel. 4I5-W, Northampton Exchange BAKERS Sweet Chocolate

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Richard Pierpoint Building, Court of Ontario, London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Cool Job Training In College images

A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

Great Bay Community College Advanced Composites Manufacturing teaching lab. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
Great Bay Community College Advanced Composites Manufacturing teaching lab. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

Governor Maggie Hassan with AMPed NH staff at Governor’s Summit on Advanced Manufacturing
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH

Cool Job Training In College images

Check out these Job Training In College images:

Kathmandu – Employment Services Centre (Saurav)
Job Training In College
Image by ILO PHOTOS NEWS
Employment Services Centre (Saurav)

Employment services used to be concentrated in a small office in the labour administration building behind the new ESC supported by the ILO

The idea is to keep these Nepalese home…

There are 14 ESCs in the country now – 5 are supported by the ILO

They are also linked to an internship programme associated with the Blind Organisation of Nepal.

1) FIRST INTERVIEW with Bhagi Chand, 27 from Baitaai District in the far western part of Nepal, a 24 hour bus ride from Kathmandu – so he can only visit his family (I child and his wife) every 3-4 months

Bhagi used to work in the local post office and was successfully placed as a security guard in a local Telecom company where he will receive 10 days of training to do the new job

2) SECOND INTERVIEW with Sawana Bhatta, Employment Counsellor at the ESC

– Most of the work is done online, she has between 10 and 20 clients a month

– She hopes for more but “most people look for government jobs here” which are scarce – so it is difficult to make them stay in Nepal

– A change of mindset is needed…

– We also took a photo of a second person, Shanti Kumari Sharma, she is the coordinator of the ESC

3) THIRD INTERVIEW with Samjhana Shestra, a half-blind, 24 year old lady from Koteshwar near Kathmandu who found her way in this hustling 1.4 million city to St. Xavier’s College held by the Jesuit order with support of the German government. ESC helped her to find an internship with the dean of the college. She has a Master in Education and wants to become a teacher…she hopes to stay in the college or work in another school

100 Dundas Street, London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Dundas Street, London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…