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Building on trades training at Okanagan College
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Image by BC Gov Photos
Trades students will benefit from a new trades training complex at Okanagan College in Kelowna. The renovated and expanded complex will have space for 2,400 students to get training in a range of trades programs, such as electrical, plumbing and welding. The complex is scheduled to open in 2016.

Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson, Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick, Kelowna-Mission MLA Steve Thomson, Okanagan College board chair Tom Styffe, and Okanagan College president Jim Hamilton toured the complex on July 29, 2015.

Learn more: www.okanagan.bc.ca/Page30149.aspx
If you are interested working in the trades, visit Blueprint Builder to explore training options and occupations: www.workbc.ca/BlueprintBuilder

Twin Office Buildings, London, Ontario
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Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

London, Ontario
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Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

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ESGR job fair 20120724-020
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Image by Kentuckyguard
Job fair, Hire Our Heroes, sponsored by the KY Office of Employment and Training, Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve, KY Dept. of Labor Vets and KY Chamber of Commerce. The event held in Florence, Ky., July 24, saw over 150 job-seekers connect with local employers. (Photo courtesy of National College)

Lakes Region Community College Advanced Manufacturing and Electronics/Electromechanics teaching lab and programs
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Image by AMPedNH
Lakes Region Community College advanced manufacturing and electronics/electromechanics manufacturing teaching lab, equipment, staff and students. Unless otherwise noted, CC BY mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

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JAXPORT jobs now offering second chances
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Image by JAXPORT
Jacksonville Port Academy Board Members
Pictured above, from left: L. Kinder Cannon, Edythe Abdullah, Kevin Gay, Doris Sias Leach, Kenneth R. Scarborough.

Board Members not pictured: Leslie Bart, Lester Bass, A. Quinn Bell, Paul Tutwiler, Tina Wirth

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 7, 2017) – Operation New Hope and JAXPORT today launched the Jacksonville Port Academy, a program designed to connect JAXPORT employers with potential employees, offering non-violent former offenders the opportunity to re-enter the local workforce in the rapidly expanding areas of transportation and logistics.

The academy’s first class of up to 15 students will start later this month with industry-specific curriculum created by the University of North Florida and Florida State College at Jacksonville. More than 10 companies doing business at the port have already pledged participation in the hiring program.

Jacksonville Port Academy was created after Operation New Hope’s founder and CEO Kevin Gay toured JAXPORT’s terminals in 2015. “Seeing the growth of the port, we began exploring avenues to discuss workforce needs and began creating initiatives to provide port employers with skilled workers,” said Gay.

“JAXPORT’s success hinges greatly upon a viable and sustainable workforce,” said Eric Green, JAXPORT Senior Director, Government and External Affairs. “The training and on-going support provided by the Jacksonville Port Academy will create real economic stability for those who deserve a second chance.”

The Jacksonville Port Academy is a collaborative effort between JAXPORT and its tenants, local education partners and Operation New Hope.

Interested employers can contact Lori Frederick, Jacksonville Port Academy Coordinator, at 904-354-4673 or LFrederick@OperationNewHope.com.

Apprenticeships delivering results for students in northern BC
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Image by BC Gov Photos
The 2014 Apprenticeship Student Outcomes Survey is the tenth annual survey of former apprenticeship students. A total of 5,698 apprentices who completed their apprenticeship training at a BC public or private post-secondary institution between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, were eligible. The survey was conducted from January to May 2014. There were 3,046 apprenticeship respondents throughout the province, for a response rate of 53%.

LEARN MORE: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2015AVED0073-001846

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Dad hopes to inspire his children through his love of learning
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Image by BC Gov Photos
Malcolm Stewart is completing the Justice and Public Safety Certificate program provided by the Justice Institute of British Columbia and the Native Education College. He also hopes his new love of learning will inspire his children. Malcolm says he wants them to understand, "If you don’t enjoy what you’re working at you won’t like your job. You find something you’re passionate about and you work at it."

Read more about Malcolm: jibcisready.jibc.ca/planning-for-a-future-through-education/

Learn about provincial support for Aboriginal learners through community-based training: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2017AVED0014-000278

National College for High Speed Rail
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Image by Department for Transport (DfT)
Ground breaking ceremonies at Birmingham and Doncaster sites mark the start of construction of the National College for High Speed Rail (NCHSR).

The college will provide the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail projects.

The National College for High Speed Rail took a significant step forward on Monday 9 May, as construction officially began on its two sites in Birmingham and Doncaster.

The breaking-ground ceremony launched the official start of construction on the two sites, in Birmingham’s Learning Quarter and at Doncaster’s Lakeside. The college is on track to open its doors to students in September 2017.

This is the latest milestone for the new high tech training facility, which will provide Britain’s workforce with the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail infrastructure projects.

Minister of State for Transport Robert Goodwill said:

“This landmark moment means we are one step closer to seeing students walk through the doors of the College in 2017, learning the cutting-edge skills we need to deliver HS2 and world-beating rail infrastructure.

“This shows the transformational effect that HS2 is already having on our country – boosting skills, generating jobs and supporting economic growth – before spades are in the ground next year.”

The minister visited the statue of Sir Nigel Gresley, designer of the Mallard steam locomotive whilst en route to Doncaster.

See the news story for further information.

DSC_1075
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Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin will join officials on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, in Huntington, from the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and the U.S. Economic Development Administration, along with local partners, for an announcement regarding ARC POWER Grant awards.

Below is a list of the West Virginia projects receiving funds:

Coalfield Development Corporation
,870,000
Natural Capital Investment Fund
,250,000
New River Gorge Regional Development Authority
7,500
Mercer County Regional Airport
,500,000
Hatfield-McCoy Trail
,372,275
EntreEd K-14
,196,450
Randolph County Development Authority
2,500
EdVenture Coding
,000
Hobet site planning
0,000
TOTAL
,988,725

West Virginia Grants POWER Grant Descriptions:

,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 work-training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue good-paying jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund, and develop a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a sustainable technical assistance grant and revolving loan fund—which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations—and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, create 225 new small business jobs, and utilize the capacity of a VISTA volunteer.

,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.

,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.

2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet—creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.

,000 ARC grant to the EdVenture Group to provide grant-writing assistance to apply for a POWER Implementation grant to train displaced workers in computer coding and other IT skills.

0,000 ARC grant to provide funding for development of a strategic plan for the Hobet Surface Mine site in Boone and Lincoln Counties. The strategic plan will assist in maximizing the fullest use of the site for economic development.

Breakdown of States Receiving Funding:

Percentage distribution of grant funds
West Virginia- ,988,725- 39.6%
Kentucky- ,736,384- 34.6%
Virginia- ,917,375- 11.6%
Ohio- ,022,758- 8.0%
Alabama- ,057,352- 4.2%
Pennsylvania- 0,000 – 2.0%
TOTAL- ,222,594- 100.0%

ARC Implementation Award Summaries, 8-22-16
•,750,000 ARC grant to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in Hazard, KY for the TechHire Eastern Kentucky (TEKY) Initiative: Developing a Technology-Driven Workforce project. The project will serve young adults aged 17-29 who are out of school, and older adults who are unemployed, laid-off, or underemployed by offering several avenues to industry-led accelerated technology training, paid work-based internships, and employment opportunities in IT careers. This comprehensive workforce development program will train 200 new workers, create 160 jobs, and serve to bolster existing and emerging sectors that rely on a skilled information technology workforce in 23 Eastern Kentucky counties. The program will provide the trained workers necessary for a private technology company to expand its operations into Eastern Kentucky.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY for the Kentucky College of Optometry (KYCO). EDA is also awarding ,974,100 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to purchase equipment, instructional supplies, and other materials to help launch a new College of Optometry. The college will both grow the healthcare workforce and improve access to vision care in Central Appalachia. KYCO will be only the second optometry college in the Appalachian Region, and will primarily serve Eastern Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, and Southwestern Virginia. Within the first three years of the award, KYCO will graduate 60 optometrists, provide care to 12,000 patients, and bring ,000,000 in direct economic impact to the regional economy.
•,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.
•,022,133 ARC grant to the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) in Berea, KY for the Economic Transition for Eastern Kentucky (ETEK) Initiative. The ARC award will expand fast-track retraining and entrepreneurial technical assistance services targeted to dislocated coal workers; establish an intern program aimed at placing former coal workers in the energy efficiency sector; and increase access to capital through a ,000,000 venture capital loan fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 100 new enterprises, serve 500 existing businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged financing to a 54-county region in Eastern Kentucky.
•,000,000 ARC grant to Ohio University in Athens, OH for the Leveraging Innovation Gateways and Hubs Toward Sustainability (LIGHTS) project. The ARC award will strengthen Southern Ohio’s entrepreneurial ecosystem by leveraging the capacity of four strategically located “Innovation Hubs” — which provide facilities, equipment and design/engineering expertise to entrepreneurs – and five regional “Gateway Centers” that link local entrepreneurs to a broad array of support services throughout the ecosystem. The project will build on the successful TechGROWTH Ohio model, create 360 new jobs, 50 new small businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged private investment to the area.
•,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 on-the-job training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue quality jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,500,000 ARC grant to Appalachian Sustainable Development in Abington, VA for the Central Appalachian Food Enterprise Corridor. This 5-state, 43-county project will develop a coordinated local foods distribution network throughout Central Appalachia, and will connect established and emerging producers in Ohio, West Virginia, Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and Eastern Kentucky to wholesale distribution markets. The ARC award will support planning, partner convening, and capacity building, as well as production and processing equipment, supplies, and labor costs, and will be supported by funding from the Just Transition Fund. The strengthened food corridor will act as regional economic driver — creating 120 jobs, retaining 250 jobs, and ultimately creating 95 new businesses.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.
•,464,251 ARC grant to the University of Kentucky Research Foundation in Lexington, KY for the Downtown Revitalization in the Promise Zone project. The ARC award — partnering with the Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky, the Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky, the Kentucky Promise Zone, Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR), and the Kentucky Mainstreet Program – will help revitalize the downtowns of 8 distressed towns in the Southeastern Kentucky Promise Zone. The project will provide each community with tailored economic studies that identify economic opportunities, support strategic planning sessions to capitalize on those opportunities, provide financial support for key steps to implement those strategies, and build local leadership and business capacity. The project will create 24 new downtown businesses, 72 new jobs, and leverage 0,000 in private investment.
•,417,375 ARC grant to Southwest Virginia Community College (SWCC) in Cedar Bluff, VA for the Retraining Energy Displaced Individuals (REDI) Center for Dislocated Coal Miners program. The REDI program will provide fast-track reemployment services directly to displaced coal miners — equipping them with the necessary skills to get back to work in a high-demand field, earning comparable wages to their previous employment. Through an intensive, accelerated program of coursework, workers can obtain credentialed skills in as little as four months, rather than the more traditional training periods of a year or more. Training will be focused on three sectors with local employment opportunities: advanced manufacturing, construction, and health technology. The program will certify 165 new trainees over the life of the award, and will be supported by funding from the Thompson Charitable Fund and the Virginia Tobacco Commission.
•,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Hatfield McCoy Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund and developing a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•7,150 ARC grant to the Shoals Entrepreneurial Center in Florence, AL for the Shoals Shift project. ARC funds will be used to offer a wide range of entrepreneurial programming, including improved access to capital and credit and development of strategies to increase the profitability of the region’s start-ups and existing businesses through more efficient use of broadband technologies. The programming includes training and activities for community members and student entrepreneurs from middle schools all the way to the university level. Activities will take place in a nine-county region covering parts of northwest Alabama, northeast Mississippi, and south central Tennessee. The project is expected to help create or retain 110 jobs, start 20 new businesses, and leverage ,000,000 in private investment.
•7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a technical assistance support program — which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations — and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, and create 225 new small-business jobs.
•2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet — creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.
•0,000 ARC grant to Pennsylvania Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc. in Russell, PA for the Nature Tourism Cluster Development in the PA Wilds project. The ARC award will be used to create a coordinated regional cluster development system to capitalize on Pennsylvania’s numerous nature-tourism assets that spread across 2,000,000 acres in 12 counties. This strategy will drive attendance to these natural attractions, and will be leveraged by 0,000 in match investments to develop a network of small businesses to support the increased demand for products and services in the area.

ARC Technical Assistance Award Summaries
Through the POWER Initiative, ARC is making funds available to assist organizations to develop plans, assess needs and prepare proposals to build a stronger economy for Appalachia’s coal-impacted communities.
•0,000 ARC grant to the West Virginia Development Office for the Hobet Strategic Plan. West Virginia will receive technical assistance to develop a detailed economic assessment and strategic plan for the best use of the Hobet Surface Mine Site in Boone and Lincoln Counties, previously the largest surface mining operation in the state.
•,000 ARC grant to The EdVenture Group in Morgantown, West Virginia for the Creating Opportunities, Diversifying Economy for displaced coal miners (CODE) project to develop a sustainable plan for economic diversification. The project being developed is expected to serve 12 counties in West Virginia.
•,202 ARC grant to the Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, Alabama, for the development of a strategic plan focusing on entrepreneurship in coal-impacted counties in the Appalachian part of Alabama. Innovation and increasing business startup activity will be the primary focus.
•,758 ARC grant to Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio, to analyze and develop a project plan for the Advanced Manufacturing Innovation and Commercialization Center. The project is expected to serve 14 counties in OH, PA, and WV.

POWER Special Projects Summaries
As part of the POWER Initiative, ARC is supporting several special projects to strengthen entrepreneurship, expand market opportunities, and address key issues in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•,000 for a partnership with the National Association of Counties Research Foundation to provide additional technical assistance to 11 teams from Appalachian coal communities that participated in the EDA-funded Innovation Challenge for Coal-Reliant Communities Program. This support includes grant writing, feasibility studies, strategic plan development or updates and capacity building to facilitate strategic and sustainable investments. Community teams are located in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•0,000 to continue a collaborative effort with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other federal partners to research opioid abuse and related problems of HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•0,000 for a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) to expand the Cool & Connected Initiative to help 10 Appalachian coal-impacted communities use broadband service to revitalize small-town main streets and promote economic development. Participating communities will receive technical assistance for strategic planning, as well as initial implementation support for the first steps of their plans. The communities are located in Alabama, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•2,000 to provide training, technical support, and expanded market opportunities to Appalachian-based coal supply chain companies through partnerships developed at MineExpo 2016, the world’s largest and most comprehensive exposition dedicated to mining equipment, products , and services. This trade show is part of the 2016 U.S. Commercial Service International Buyer Program schedule, which connects U.S. exhibitors with foreign buyer delegations at the show. ARC funds will be used to ensure the participation of companies from Appalachia and enable them to get international trade support tailored to the specific needs of the individual companies. Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission in Altoona, Pennsylvania, is coordinating the ARC assistance.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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Dad and Ed doing car-repair work – Denver, spring 1950
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Image by Ed Yourdon
Mom’s note on this print says "The men work on the car Saturday while Mom goes downtown to shop!"

**********************************

All of the photos in this album are “originals” from the 3-month period that my family spent in Denver from 1947-50 — i.e., the period before I lived in Omaha, Riverside, Roswell, Ft. Worth and a separate stay in Denver in 1951-53 (which you may have seen already in my Flickr archives).

Before I get into the details, let me make a strong request — if you’re looking at these photos, and if you are getting any enjoyment at all of this brief look at some mundane Americana from 65+ years ago: find a similar episode in your own life, and write it down. Gather the pictures, clean them up, and upload them somewhere on the Internet where they can be found. Trust me: there will come a day when the only person on the planet who actually experienced those events is you. Your own memories may be fuzzy and incomplete; but they will be invaluable to your friends and family members, and to many generations of your descendants. (Actually, I should listen to my own advice: unlike my subsequent visits to Roswell, Riverside, and Omaha I did not even track this early home down, let alone take any photos.)

So, what do I remember about the 3 early-childhood years that I spent in Denver? Since I was only 3 years old when we first moved there, the simple answer is: hardly anything. Here are the few random memories that I can dredge up:

1. I don’t think my Dad had even seen the ocean as a boy, but that didn’t stop him from enlisting in the Navy a while after he graduated from high school (there weren’t many other jobs on the Utah-Colorado border in those Depression-era days). He got sent out to the Pacific on some kind of naval vessel … and as it turned out, his ship was behind schedule getting back to home port in Hawaii on the evening of December 6, 1941. The submarine nets into Oahu harbor had been drawn closed, and his ship had to anchor outside … which helps explain why his ship didn’t end up at the bottom of the harbor the next morning.

2. Fifty years later, on December 7, 1991, I happened to be in a big park in downtown Tokyo, surrounded by thousands of young Japanese citizens, cheering as they waved their red-and-white national flags back and forth — waiting for a glimpse of the new Japanese empress, who was being presented to the public for the first time after her wedding. I heard someone near me speaking in English, so I asked him if he thought there was anything special about the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day. He was polite, but he was also puzzled and confused: he had never heard the phrase before.

3. But I digress … Dad eventually got back to the U.S. and left the Navy in 1947 while stationed in Washington, DC. Like so many of his generation, he decided to go to college, with most expenses paid for by the G.I. Bill. He managed to get into Denver University, and he went on ahead of my mother and me. I vaguely remember that we took the train all the way out there. (I probably don’t remember it at all; but my mother repeatedly told me about some strange man grabbing me out of her arms, and dashing off to the restroom on the train … all I know is that we arrived in Denver safely.)

4. We lived in an old form of military housing, known as Quonset Huts, at the edge of the D.U. campus, and I had a tiny bedroom to myself. I have only a few memories of the place: during the brutally-cold winters, Dad would use a garden hose to fill the tiny patch of grass outside the front door with a sheet of water … which froze, and provided the neighborhood kids with a place to ice-skate.

5. Though it wasn’t a hardship, I do remember that we had relatively little money for food. My grandparents still lived out near the Utah-Colorado border (just south of the small town of Vernal), and once a week they would send a dozen fresh eggs to us, packed in a carefully padded wooden box. We also made our own ice cream, and I’ll never forget the time Dad used some food-coloring to make blue ice-cream. I had no idea that ice cream could be any color other than brown (chocolate) or white (vanilla).

6. During our last year in Denver, I attended kindergarten. I was allowed to walk to school, which felt like it was miles away, across several interstate highways. But there were no Interstates at the time, and it was probably just a two-lane street a few blocks away…

7. At Christmas and a few other times of the year, we drove from Denver to spend the holidays with my grandparents. Not only were there no Interstate highways in those days, but there were also no ski resorts: no Vail, no Aspen. I think we drove on the old highway U.S. 40, and we went through a mountain pass (Rabbit Ear pass?) that was always snow-filled, bitter-cold, and dangerous in the winter. Invariably, Dad had to stop to put tire-chains on the car, a process that entailed much cursing and yelling. But we always got there.

8. Dad went to school 12 months of each year, and got a B.S. in Electrical Engineering after just 3 years, in June of 1950. I was allowed to wear his graduation cape and gown for a few minutes, and I snuck a paper airplane into the huge gymnasium where friends and families gathered to watch the graduation ceremony. We were way in the back, way up high; and I was convinced that my airplane would sail all the way across the gym, if only I could throw it. If only, if only … but I didn’t.

9. Dad must have gotten a job (back in Glen Oaks, NY) right away, and their lease/rental of the Quonset Hut must have ended at about the same time. I mention that only because he drove back East alone, leaving me and my very pregnant mother behind. We lived in a tiny apartment at an old Air Force base at the edge of Denver (Buckley Field?) until July, when it was time for my mother to head to the hospital and deliver my sister, Patrice. Meanwhile, I was picked up by Dad’s older brother, and driven all the way out to Utah to spend a week with my grandparents … before everyone reconnected in Denver, and we took an airplane flight back East.

10. There is probably more … but that’s all I can remember at this point…

Ed with a tractor – Jensen, UT, summer 1947
Job Training In College
Image by Ed Yourdon
I put these photos into the "Denver 1947-50" Flickr album, even though they were all taken in Utah — because they were apparently taken during the period after my family had moved from Washington out to Denver, where Ray attended college on the GI Bill.

Apparently we visited Ray’s parents sometime during that first summer; they had a farm in a very small town called Jensen — east of Vernal,and near the Green River.

*********************************

This is me, at approx 3 years of age, at the (Ike & Mabel) Yourdon family farm in Utah.

**********************************

All of the photos in this album are “originals” from the 3-month period that my family spent in Denver from 1947-50 — i.e., the period before I lived in Omaha, Riverside, Roswell, Ft. Worth and a separate stay in Denver in 1951-53 (which you may have seen already in my Flickr archives).

Before I get into the details, let me make a strong request — if you’re looking at these photos, and if you are getting any enjoyment at all of this brief look at some mundane Americana from 65+ years ago: find a similar episode in your own life, and write it down. Gather the pictures, clean them up, and upload them somewhere on the Internet where they can be found. Trust me: there will come a day when the only person on the planet who actually experienced those events is you. Your own memories may be fuzzy and incomplete; but they will be invaluable to your friends and family members, and to many generations of your descendants. (Actually, I should listen to my own advice: unlike my subsequent visits to Roswell, Riverside, and Omaha I did not even track this early home down, let alone take any photos.)

So, what do I remember about the 3 early-childhood years that I spent in Denver? Since I was only 3 years old when we first moved there, the simple answer is: hardly anything. Here are the few random memories that I can dredge up:

1. I don’t think my Dad had even seen the ocean as a boy, but that didn’t stop him from enlisting in the Navy a while after he graduated from high school (there weren’t many other jobs on the Utah-Colorado border in those Depression-era days). He got sent out to the Pacific on some kind of naval vessel … and as it turned out, his ship was behind schedule getting back to home port in Hawaii on the evening of December 6, 1941. The submarine nets into Oahu harbor had been drawn closed, and his ship had to anchor outside … which helps explain why his ship didn’t end up at the bottom of the harbor the next morning.

2. Fifty years later, on December 7, 1991, I happened to be in a big park in downtown Tokyo, surrounded by thousands of young Japanese citizens, cheering as they waved their red-and-white national flags back and forth — waiting for a glimpse of the new Japanese empress, who was being presented to the public for the first time after her wedding. I heard someone near me speaking in English, so I asked him if he thought there was anything special about the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day. He was polite, but he was also puzzled and confused: he had never heard the phrase before.

3. But I digress … Dad eventually got back to the U.S. and left the Navy in 1947 while stationed in Washington, DC. Like so many of his generation, he decided to go to college, with most expenses paid for by the G.I. Bill. He managed to get into Denver University, and he went on ahead of my mother and me. I vaguely remember that we took the train all the way out there. (I probably don’t remember it at all; but my mother repeatedly told me about some strange man grabbing me out of her arms, and dashing off to the restroom on the train … all I know is that we arrived in Denver safely.)

4. We lived in an old form of military housing, known as Quonset Huts, at the edge of the D.U. campus, and I had a tiny bedroom to myself. I have only a few memories of the place: during the brutally-cold winters, Dad would use a garden hose to fill the tiny patch of grass outside the front door with a sheet of water … which froze, and provided the neighborhood kids with a place to ice-skate.

5. Though it wasn’t a hardship, I do remember that we had relatively little money for food. My grandparents still lived out near the Utah-Colorado border (just south of the small town of Vernal), and once a week they would send a dozen fresh eggs to us, packed in a carefully padded wooden box. We also made our own ice cream, and I’ll never forget the time Dad used some food-coloring to make blue ice-cream. I had no idea that ice cream could be any color other than brown (chocolate) or white (vanilla).

6. During our last year in Denver, I attended kindergarten. I was allowed to walk to school, which felt like it was miles away, across several interstate highways. But there were no Interstates at the time, and it was probably just a two-lane street a few blocks away…

7. At Christmas and a few other times of the year, we drove from Denver to spend the holidays with my grandparents. Not only were there no Interstate highways in those days, but there were also no ski resorts: no Vail, no Aspen. I think we drove on the old highway U.S. 40, and we went through a mountain pass (Rabbit Ear pass?) that was always snow-filled, bitter-cold, and dangerous in the winter. Invariably, Dad had to stop to put tire-chains on the car, a process that entailed much cursing and yelling. But we always got there.

8. Dad went to school 12 months of each year, and got a B.S. in Electrical Engineering after just 3 years, in June of 1950. I was allowed to wear his graduation cape and gown for a few minutes, and I snuck a paper airplane into the huge gymnasium where friends and families gathered to watch the graduation ceremony. We were way in the back, way up high; and I was convinced that my airplane would sail all the way across the gym, if only I could throw it. If only, if only … but I didn’t.

9. Dad must have gotten a job (back in Glen Oaks, NY) right away, and their lease/rental of the Quonset Hut must have ended at about the same time. I mention that only because he drove back East alone, leaving me and my very pregnant mother behind. We lived in a tiny apartment at an old Air Force base at the edge of Denver (Buckley Field?) until July, when it was time for my mother to head to the hospital and deliver my sister, Patrice. Meanwhile, I was picked up by Dad’s older brother, and driven all the way out to Utah to spend a week with my grandparents … before everyone reconnected in Denver, and we took an airplane flight back East.

10. There is probably more … but that’s all I can remember at this point…

Ed, in Dad’s graduation cap and gown – Denver, June 1950
Job Training In College
Image by Ed Yourdon
Mom’s album notes say, "Eddie in Ray’s cap and gown, June 1950"

**********************************

All of the photos in this album are “originals” from the 3-month period that my family spent in Denver from 1947-50 — i.e., the period before I lived in Omaha, Riverside, Roswell, Ft. Worth and a separate stay in Denver in 1951-53 (which you may have seen already in my Flickr archives).

Before I get into the details, let me make a strong request — if you’re looking at these photos, and if you are getting any enjoyment at all of this brief look at some mundane Americana from 65+ years ago: find a similar episode in your own life, and write it down. Gather the pictures, clean them up, and upload them somewhere on the Internet where they can be found. Trust me: there will come a day when the only person on the planet who actually experienced those events is you. Your own memories may be fuzzy and incomplete; but they will be invaluable to your friends and family members, and to many generations of your descendants. (Actually, I should listen to my own advice: unlike my subsequent visits to Roswell, Riverside, and Omaha I did not even track this early home down, let alone take any photos.)

So, what do I remember about the 3 early-childhood years that I spent in Denver? Since I was only 3 years old when we first moved there, the simple answer is: hardly anything. Here are the few random memories that I can dredge up:

1. I don’t think my Dad had even seen the ocean as a boy, but that didn’t stop him from enlisting in the Navy a while after he graduated from high school (there weren’t many other jobs on the Utah-Colorado border in those Depression-era days). He got sent out to the Pacific on some kind of naval vessel … and as it turned out, his ship was behind schedule getting back to home port in Hawaii on the evening of December 6, 1941. The submarine nets into Oahu harbor had been drawn closed, and his ship had to anchor outside … which helps explain why his ship didn’t end up at the bottom of the harbor the next morning.

2. Fifty years later, on December 7, 1991, I happened to be in a big park in downtown Tokyo, surrounded by thousands of young Japanese citizens, cheering as they waved their red-and-white national flags back and forth — waiting for a glimpse of the new Japanese empress, who was being presented to the public for the first time after her wedding. I heard someone near me speaking in English, so I asked him if he thought there was anything special about the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day. He was polite, but he was also puzzled and confused: he had never heard the phrase before.

3. But I digress … Dad eventually got back to the U.S. and left the Navy in 1947 while stationed in Washington, DC. Like so many of his generation, he decided to go to college, with most expenses paid for by the G.I. Bill. He managed to get into Denver University, and he went on ahead of my mother and me. I vaguely remember that we took the train all the way out there. (I probably don’t remember it at all; but my mother repeatedly told me about some strange man grabbing me out of her arms, and dashing off to the restroom on the train … all I know is that we arrived in Denver safely.)

4. We lived in an old form of military housing, known as Quonset Huts, at the edge of the D.U. campus, and I had a tiny bedroom to myself. I have only a few memories of the place: during the brutally-cold winters, Dad would use a garden hose to fill the tiny patch of grass outside the front door with a sheet of water … which froze, and provided the neighborhood kids with a place to ice-skate.

5. Though it wasn’t a hardship, I do remember that we had relatively little money for food. My grandparents still lived out near the Utah-Colorado border (just south of the small town of Vernal), and once a week they would send a dozen fresh eggs to us, packed in a carefully padded wooden box. We also made our own ice cream, and I’ll never forget the time Dad used some food-coloring to make blue ice-cream. I had no idea that ice cream could be any color other than brown (chocolate) or white (vanilla).

6. During our last year in Denver, I attended kindergarten. I was allowed to walk to school, which felt like it was miles away, across several interstate highways. But there were no Interstates at the time, and it was probably just a two-lane street a few blocks away…

7. At Christmas and a few other times of the year, we drove from Denver to spend the holidays with my grandparents. Not only were there no Interstate highways in those days, but there were also no ski resorts: no Vail, no Aspen. I think we drove on the old highway U.S. 40, and we went through a mountain pass (Rabbit Ear pass?) that was always snow-filled, bitter-cold, and dangerous in the winter. Invariably, Dad had to stop to put tire-chains on the car, a process that entailed much cursing and yelling. But we always got there.

8. Dad went to school 12 months of each year, and got a B.S. in Electrical Engineering after just 3 years, in June of 1950. I was allowed to wear his graduation cape and gown for a few minutes, and I snuck a paper airplane into the huge gymnasium where friends and families gathered to watch the graduation ceremony. We were way in the back, way up high; and I was convinced that my airplane would sail all the way across the gym, if only I could throw it. If only, if only … but I didn’t.

9. Dad must have gotten a job (back in Glen Oaks, NY) right away, and their lease/rental of the Quonset Hut must have ended at about the same time. I mention that only because he drove back East alone, leaving me and my very pregnant mother behind. We lived in a tiny apartment at an old Air Force base at the edge of Denver (Buckley Field?) until July, when it was time for my mother to head to the hospital and deliver my sister, Patrice. Meanwhile, I was picked up by Dad’s older brother, and driven all the way out to Utah to spend a week with my grandparents … before everyone reconnected in Denver, and we took an airplane flight back East.

10. There is probably more … but that’s all I can remember at this point…

Cool Job Training In College images

Some cool Job Training In College images:

Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course kicks off
Job Training In College
Image by RDECOM
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUNDS, Md. – Officials from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command welcomed 33 students to the Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course Dec. 7.

This is the first time the Army has exported the class outside the AMSC campus. The RDECOM leadership partnered with AMSC to bring the program to Aberdeen to begin leadership training in anticipation of the impact of Base Realignment and Closure. The BRAC will bring thousands of jobs to APG in the next couple of years. Read more…

This is me
Job Training In College
Image by Aaron Gustafson
This is me, I work on the web.

I started working on the web back in 1996 when I wanted to build a website for the magazine I had started. I was still in college, but there were no courses on web design so I had to teach myself. I picked up a copy of Creating & Enhancing Netscape Web Pages from the bargain bin of my local Comp USA and started reading.

After graduating from New College in 1999, I took a job as one of the two people working on the online edition of the Bradenton Herald. That’s right, I said two people. At the time, newspapers weren’t doing much online and my job was to come in at 10 or 11PM and copy a few of the top stories over from the Quark layouts into our HTML files. Nothing was automated, there was no archiving, and Dreamweaver’s WYSIWYG was pretty much what I lived in. Oh, and under the hood was pure tag soup. I can’t take credit for it, but it’s funny to look back on it.

In 2000, my fiance (now my wife), Kelly McCarthy, got into Yale Divinity School and we moved to Connecticut, where I began working as a freelancer for a bunch of companies, including Gartner and Deloitte & Touche. I began working in Homesite almost exclusively and was spending most of my time fixing broken table-based layouts some 30 to 40 tables deep. It was horrible, but I got really good at it.

Between 2001 and 2002, I worked on sites for a wide variety of companies—IBM, Delta Airlines, Aetna, and Scholastic to name a few—before settling into the team lead position in Cronin and Company’s newly-formed "digital" department. While there, I created a great team and we did some fantastic work for clients including Konica Minolta, the Connecticut Lottery, the CT Dept. of Transportation, and Mystic Aquarium among others. It was there that I really began to focus on web standards-based development.

I left Cronin in 2006 to work on building my own web consultancy, Easy! Designs LLC.

Over the years, I’ve worn just about every hat you can on a web project: strategist, information architect, designer, developer, copywriter, etc. I’ve built numerous web applications, content management systems, e-commerce systems, surveying tools, and more websites than I can count using (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and Ruby on Rails. Honestly, I wouldn’t have it any other way; I like variety.

Lately, I’ve been dividing my time between training web teams in CSS and JavaScript, producing XHTML, CSS & JavaScript for companies such as Adaptive Path and Happy Cog, and building websites for a growing list of companies and non-profits.

This is who I am… who are you?

Photo Credit: Cindy Li

Cool Job Training In College images

Some cool Job Training In College images:

BC provides more than 0,000 to support new viticulture diploma at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
The Province is providing over 8,000 to support a two-year pilot project for the viticulture technician diploma program at Okanagan College, developed in partnership with the BC Wine Grape Council.

The diploma is designed to provide hands-on, theoretical and practical knowledge that will allow students to eventually work as part of a vineyard management team. The program is structured around the viticulture growing season, providing opportunities to develop and apply skills like: canopy management, pest control, pruning, training vines and sensory evaluation.

Learn more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2017JTST0128-001045

Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course kicks off
Job Training In College
Image by RDECOM
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUNDS, Md. – Officials from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command welcomed 33 students to the Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course Dec. 7.

This is the first time the Army has exported the class outside the AMSC campus. The RDECOM leadership partnered with AMSC to bring the program to Aberdeen to begin leadership training in anticipation of the impact of Base Realignment and Closure. The BRAC will bring thousands of jobs to APG in the next couple of years. Read more…

Cool Job Training In College images

A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

DSC_1937 sos
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS

Address highlights top priorities and key pieces of legislation

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (January 13, 2016) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today delivered the 2016 State of the State Address in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex.

Gov. Tomblin’s remarks included an overview of new programs and initiatives related to his top priorities as governor, as well as a number of new pieces of legislation he plans to introduce during the 2016 Legislative Session.

Since becoming governor in November 2010, Gov. Tomblin has focused on issues such as workforce development, combatting substance abuse, responsible fiscal policies and job creation. Following are highlights from the State of the State speech and other legislative initiatives of Gov. Tomblin.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Gov. Tomblin has worked to create a positive business climate now and for decades to come, and he remains committed to working with business and industry leaders from a variety of industries to create new investments and bring jobs to West Virginia. Companies from across the nation and around the world are noticing the changes the state has made, and nationally and internationally recognized companies – including Macy’s Amazon, Quad Graphics, Hino Motors, Diamond Electric, Toyota and Procter and Gamble – have chosen to locate, expand and invest in West Virginia.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin added another company to the list of those that have committed to West Virginia. During the address, Gov. Tomblin announced polymer additive manufacturer Addivant has decided to stay and expand operations in Morgantown, saving nearly 100 jobs and adding at least million in new investments and additional opportunities for employment.

While these large investments are a vital part of West Virginia’s long-term success, Gov. Tomblin is also committed to ensuring small business owners have a chance to excel and grow. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced the Self-Employment Assistance Act, designed to make it easier for unemployed West Virginians to get the help they need to open a business. The act allows entrepreneurs to continue receiving unemployment benefits while establishing their new business. This helps owners reinvest in their new venture and employees, while also providing a steady source of financial support for their families.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In working to bring new investments and create jobs, Gov. Tomblin has also made it a top priority to ensure these jobs are filled by skilled and well-trained West Virginians. With the help of his Workforce Planning Council, Gov. Tomblin has established new workforce development programs and strengthened existing initiatives to meet the needs of business and industry operating here. The state has received more than million in federal grant funding to support Workforce West Virginia operations across the state, helping coal miners, their families, and those who have exhausted their unemployment benefits find careers in growing industries.

Through a collaborative partnership among business, industry, education and labor leaders, Gov. Tomblin has established a new Regional Job Matching Database, an online source for both educational program listings and employment opportunities available close to people’s homes. This database will help match students with training programs in critical needs areas and connect them with employers seeking those same skills.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin also plans to introduce legislation that will expand the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ (WVDHHR) Temporary Assistance to Need Families (TANF) pilot program. Through a partnership with the WVDHHR and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, the pilot program was designed to help West Virginians already receiving TANF benefits enroll in college courses, get access to financial aid and work with advisors to begin a new career path to support themselves and their families. With this program expansion, more West Virginians will receive the help and support they need to become productive, successful members of their local communities.

STRENGTHENING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

Gov. Tomblin has dedicated much of his public service to supporting West Virginia’s coal miners and their families. In recent years, both the state and nation have experienced unprecedented downturns in this industry, adversely affecting local operations and devastating the lives of many hardworking West Virginians.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin highlighted ongoing efforts to support and strengthen all those affected by the downturn in the coal industry. The state has submitted an application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), seeking more than 0 million in funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. This competition has the potential to help Boone, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, McDowell and Wyoming counties adjust, adapt and advance their communities. If successful, funding will be allocated to help repair and rebuild aging infrastructure, promote land use planning and hazard reduction efforts and stimulate housing and economic development in the region.

Gov. Tomblin tonight also announced plans to develop of the largest industrial site in West Virginia history – the former Hobet surface mine in Boone and Lincoln counties. At 12,000 acres, this property is large enough to fit every major economic development project in recent history – with thousands of acres left over. The state is working in partnership with local landowners, Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund to find ways to re-develop this site and diversify southern West Virginia’s economy.

ENERGY

In working to ensure West Virginia’s energy sector is strong and diverse, Gov. Tomblin has also worked hard to support development of West Virginia’s abundant Marcellus, Utica and Rogersville shale formations. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin stressed the need to create the processing and pipeline infrastructure necessary to ensure this industry’s continued growth now and for years to come, highlighting major investment projects such as the Columbia Gas Mountaineer Xpress pipeline.

Gov. Tomblin also announced that while the Department of Environmental Protection continues to work on a feasibility study related to the state’s Clean Power Plan Submission, it’s likely that plan will include items such as reforestation and replacement of boilers to improve the efficiency of existing coal-fired power plans.

TACKLING SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Gov. Tomblin has made combatting the state’s substance abuse epidemic a top priority of his administration. As communities and families across West Virginia continue to battle substance abuse from a number of fronts, Gov. Tomblin has invested a significant amount of time and funding to strengthen community-based treatment options and programs to give those struggling hope and get them on the road to recovery.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to support ongoing substance abuse efforts. He announced new licensing requirements for Suboxone and Methadone clinics, requiring medication-assisted treatment facilities to provide comprehensive therapies in coordination with medication to help to treat the root causes behind addictions, rather than simply supplying a short-term fix.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to expand the Opioid Antagonist Act of 2015, making opioid antagonists, such as Narcan, available to any West Virginian without a prescription. This new legislation requires pharmacists to train those who receive this drug on how to administer opioid antagonists and helps the state track those receiving Narcan to help better focus state resources in areas hardest hit by opioid overdoses.

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Gov. Tomblin’s juvenile justice reforms have also made a significant impact on our state’s youth, as he has worked to improve outcomes for those currently in the juvenile justice system and provide early-intervention care to at-risk students to keep them in the classroom and out of the courtroom. During his address, Gov. Tomblin touted the success of 2015’s Juvenile Justice Reform, specifically highlighting positive results of the truancy diversion program.

He also announced the Division of Juvenile Services has reduced the number of kids being sent to out-of-home placements by more than one-third and reduced the number of detention beds by more than 40 percent. So far the state has saved million, and the Division of Juvenile Services is confident West Virginia can double that savings in coming years.

EDUCATION

Ensuring students remain in the classroom for 180 days of learning is just one of Gov. Tomblin’s education priorities, as he is equally committed to ensuring West Virginia’s education system stands ready to provide students with the thorough and efficient education they deserve. In addition, they should receive new learning opportunities that supply the skills and hands-on experience they need achieve long-term success in West Virginia.

To improve upon West Virginia’s educational offerings, Gov. Tomblin has created the Innovation in Education Grant Program, which will not only supply students with special skills and hands-on training, but will also give them the opportunity to compete among their peers on a national and world-wide scale. This new program is designed to reward teachers and schools in West Virginia for innovation and creativity in the classroom. The reallocation of .8 million in existing West Virginia Department of Education money will support new classroom offerings that are designed to help students develop and gain these skills in high-demand fields, such as science, technology, engineering, math and entrepreneurship.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

Throughout his administration, Gov. Tomblin has made sure to enact and uphold fiscally responsible policies. He understands the state is experiencing significant budget challenges, but remains committed to making difficult choices now that will help ensure West Virginia has a bright future now and for years to come.

Gov. Tomblin tonight introduced legislation to pay off West Virginia’s old workers’ compensation debt more than a decade ahead of schedule. This also will remove additional severance taxes on coal and natural gas industries earlier than anticipated, providing much-needed relief for energy businesses struggling with low prices.

In helping to ensure West Virginia’s tax base is both stable and diverse, Gov. Tomblin tonight also proposed raising the state’s tobacco tax by 45 cents to a total of a pack. This increase will not only help discourage West Virginians from smoking or using tobacco products, it will also provide .5 million annually to support health-related costs. million of this revenue will help fund PEIA, ensuring public employees do not see the dramatic benefit reductions initially proposed.

Gov. Tomblin also proposed legislation to eliminate a sale tax exemption that will bring our state’s telecommunications tax in line with 41 other states across the country. This legislation will place the same 6 percent sales tax on cell phone and phone line usage and generate million annually.

With these proposed changes, the 2017 budget Gov. Tomblin presented uses no money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and in fact predicts surpluses beginning in 2019.

Gov. Tomblin will also introduce the following pieces of legislation:

Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Reporting Update

Updates current West Virginia code to reflect 2014 federal law for compliance and continuation of federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Authorizes information sharing by Workforce West Virginia with the state agencies responsible for vocational rehabilitation, employment and training to better align the workforce system with education and economic development in an effort to create a collective response to economic and labor market challenges on the national, state and local levels.

West Virginia Workforce Development Board Updates

Updates the composition of the West Virginia Workforce Investment Council and changes its name to the West Virginia Workforce Development Board to comply with WIOA.

Borrowing from Rainy Day for Unemployment Compensation Fund

Authorizes borrowing in amount up to million to provide additional funds for unemployment compensation.

Controlled Substances Monitoring Program (CSMP) Update Bill:

Requires practitioners (doctors, pharmacists and others) to register for the CSMP to obtain or renew a license.

Creates an administrative fine of ,000 for failure to register for the CSMP, as well as an administrative fine of 0 for failure to access the CSMP as required.

Certificate of Need Exemption for Out-Patient Behavioral Health Community-Based Services

Exempts community-based behavioral health care facilities, programs or services from the certificate of need process contained in W.Va. Code 16-2D-1 et seq.

811 – One Call System

Makes underground pipelines of 4" in diameter and greater subject to "call before you dig" reporting if not otherwise required by state or federal law. Applies to gas, oil or any hazardous substance pipelines.

Membership in 811 requires an entity to provide mapping data indicating where their underground pipelines are located and to respond within the specified time periods when notified by the 811 administrator and be able to mark its underground pipes.

15 Minutes Rule

Requires that drilling, production and pipeline activities are subject to the state’s 15-minute emergency notification law (WV Code 15-5B-3a (b)(1)).

Provisions apply to emergency events that involve a death or serious injuries, unplanned ignitions, fires or explosions and similar serious emergency events (confirmed emergencies) at drilling, production and pipeline sites.

Notification must be provided within 15 minutes to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and include preliminary information regarding the nature and extent of the emergency event, any existence or non-existence of threats to public health, substances involved or released and designated principal contact information.

Transportation Network Company Bill (TNC) – Uber/Lyft

Authorizes TNCs to operate in West Virginia by obtaining a permit from DMV.

Requires automobile insurance and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

Requires a zero tolerance for drug and alcohol policy.

Requires TNCs to have a nondiscrimination policy and comply with nondiscrimination laws.

Office of Coalfield Community Development Bill

Continues the Office of Coalfield Community Development in Commerce (previously in Division of Energy)

Air Ambulance Bill

Provides air transportation or related emergency or treatment services providers operating in West Virginia from collecting more for service from PEIA covered persons than the currently allowable Medicare reimbursement rate.

Repeal Behavioral Health Severance & Privilege Tax

Eliminates the behavioral health severance and privilege tax and limits the sales tax exemption on durable medical goods to those purchased for home use only.

The change is believed to be revenue neutral and will help ensure continued federal matching funds for Medicaid and Medicare.

Reduce Required Annual Severance Tax Deposit to Infrastructure Bond Fund

Reduces the amount of severance tax proceeds deposited into the West Virginia Infrastructure General Obligation Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service on such bonds from .5 million annually to an amount equal to annual debt service, not to exceed .25 million annually.

Personal Income Tax update

Updates the Personal Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws

CNIT Update & Revised Filing Date

Updates the Corporate Net Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws.

Intermodal

Terminates funding of the Special Railroad and Intermodal Enhancement Fund beginning January 1, 2016. The source of funding is corporate net income taxes.

Racetrack and Historic Hotel Modernization Funds Cessation

Ends the Licensed Racetrack Modernization Fund and Historic Hotel Modernization Fund and moves all funds currently in such funds to the General Revenue Fund.

Cessation of Deposit into Road Fund from Sales Tax for FY2016

Eliminates for fiscal year 2016 the deposit of sales tax proceeds into the State Road Fund from sales of construction and maintenance materials acquired by a second party for use in the construction or maintenance of a highway project.

Such sales tax proceeds will be deposited into the General Revenue Fund in lieu of the State Road Fund.

State Aid Formula Changes

Eliminates the Growth County School Facilities Act, which allowed growth county boards of education to designate general fund revenues from new construction (increasing property taxes) for placement in a growth county school facilities act fund.

Adjusts the formulas for the foundation allowance for both professional educators and service personnel.

Adjusts and eliminates certain adjustments to the foundation allowance for transportation costs (increasing bus life from 12 to 15 years and mileage from 180,000 to 225,000 miles).

Adjusts the calculation for the foundation allowance to improve instructional programs.

Eliminates certain restrictions in the computation of the local share applicable to growth county schools.

Infrastructure Fund Excess Lottery Deposit Reduction

Decreases the annual deposit of Excess Lottery revenues to the Infrastructure Fund from million to million for fiscal year 2017.

Increases the percentage of funds that may be disbursed from the Infrastructure Fund in the form of grants from 20% to 50% for fiscal year 2017.

SBA Deposit Reduction

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the annual deposit of sales tax proceeds into the School Building Authority’s School Major Improvement Fund from million to million (was reduced for FY16 to million).

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the School Building Authority’s School Construction Fund from ,216,996 to ,216,996 (was reduced for FY16 to ,216,996).

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

Great Bay Community College Advanced Composites Manufacturing Lab grand opening
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Image by AMPedNH
Great Bay Community College Advanced Composites Manufacturing teaching lab grand opening celebration. Mandatory credit: Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

AMPed NH industry Partner Tours – Omni Components
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Image by AMPedNH
Equipment and employees featured during Omni Components Tour in 2013. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

Cool Job Training In College images

Some cool Job Training In College images:

ESGR job fair 20120724-029
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Image by Kentuckyguard
Job fair, Hire Our Heroes, sponsored by the KY Office of Employment and Training, Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve, KY Dept. of Labor Vets and KY Chamber of Commerce. The event held in Florence, Ky., July 24, saw over 150 job-seekers connect with local employers. (Photo courtesy of National College)

Cool Job Training In College images

Some cool Job Training In College images:

UMD Study: Fiscal Cliff Could Trigger Deep Recession, Fear of Cliff Has Cut GDP Already
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Image by Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases
COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The so-called "fiscal cliff" has already begun dampening the U.S. economy – even before it officially kicks in – and by year’s end will have cut 2012 GDP an estimated six-tenths of one percent, says a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland’s Interindustry Forecasting Project (Inforum).

The study, called Fiscal Shock: America’s Economic Crisis, is one of the first to look beyond the first year effects of the combined federal spending cuts and tax increases. It projects an escalating impact into 2014 and beyond, as "multiplier" effects of fiscal contraction kick in.

At its worst, the study says that, compared to a baseline forecast of moderate growth, six million jobs could be lost. The unemployment rate could reach 11 percent, and real personal income could drop nearly 10 percent.

"The fiscal cliff could produce a steeper growth drop than other predictions suggest," says study author Jeff Werling, Inforum executive director at the University of Maryland. "One of the most important lessons learned since the financial crisis is that when consumers are bent on reducing debt burdens, and short term interest rates are stuck at zero, then fiscal multipliers are particularly large. We saw this with the positive effect of the stimulus program through 2010, and we certainly have noticed this with the disastrous austerity programs across Europe."

The study, conducted by Inforum with the support of the National Association Manufacturers, predicts the likely outcome of so-called "Sequestration" – automatic, across-the-board, federal defense spending cuts required by Congress, along with the expiration of a number of tax cuts.

"The mere anticipation of the fiscal cliff has already hurt the economy, and the meter is running," Werling adds. "Going over the cliff would completely undermine the fragile recovery and the effect would snowball at least through 2014. Full recovery could take up to a decade. Our numbers suggest that failure to reach a resolution will have a deeply punishing effect on the nation."

Key study findings:

* Combined, the pending increase in federal tax increases and expenditure reductions total over 3 percent of GDP in 2013.

* Because of the uncertainty surrounding fiscal policy, consumers and businesses already have reduced spending significantly, cutting perhaps 0.6 percentage points of annualized GDP growth over 2012.

* Compared to a baseline of moderate growth, the level of GDP will be at least 3 percent lower in 2013 and almost 5 percent lower in 2014.

* By 2014, the fiscal contraction will result in the loss of almost 6 million jobs compared to the baseline, and the unemployment rate could reach over 11 percent.

* Given the increase in tax rates, real personal disposable income will drop almost 10 percent by 2015, compared to the baseline.

* It will take most of the decade for economic activity and employment levels to recover from the fiscal shock. In addition, there is a significant threat that another recession could deal a substantial blow to long term economic potential, permanently reducing living standards in the American economy.

Next Steps

Werling urges a so-called balanced approach to avoiding further pressures as the economy nears the fiscal cliff. The key, he says, is to absorb cutbacks more slowly.

"It is clear that resolving the federal deficits will require both significant discretionary spending cuts and revenue increases that accompany tax reform," Werling explains. "Ultimately we will have to restructure entitlement programs as well. But such measures can and must be accomplished steadily and gradually over time so as not to unduly harm near term economic growth."

He adds: "Instead, we have engineered a fiscal train wreck that would have enormous consequences to economic growth now and into the future. We need to change course as soon as possible."

Inforum was founded 45 years ago in the Department of Economics and is dedicated to improving business planning, government policy analysis and the general understanding of the economic environment.

FULL REPORT ONLINE

Report summary: www.nam.org/%7E/media/CF4C211314D340B08E2C6AA4FFD07FBB.ashx

Full report: www.nam.org/%7E/media/CF4C211314D340B08E2C6AA4FFD07FBB.ashx

Contact Information:

Jeff Werling
Executive Director
Inforum
301 405-4607
werling@econ.umd.edu
www.inforum.umd.edu

Visiting new trades centre at Okanagan College
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Image by BC Gov Photos
Advanced Education Minister Andrew Wilkinson got to check out construction of the new trades training complex at Okanagan College during a visit to the college on Feb. 5, 2015. He also got to meet with students, faculty and staff.

Minister Wilkinson also announced funding for new trades training equipment at Okanagan College: www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca/2015/02/trades-equipment-helps-oka…