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Image from page 348 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)

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Image from page 348 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp10balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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expensive. The demand for durable timbers has in-creased. In 1904, thirty-three pressuretreating plants were in operation, with anannual capacity of about one-fourth billionboard feet of timber. In 1921, 122 plants were in operation.They treated more than 2,400,000,000board feet, and others are being l)uilt tomeet increased demand. Eighty-five per cent, of the tini!)er treatedis fof railroad uses. The i)rescrvative treatment of wood haslong since passed the experimental stage.There is no guess work about the resultsobtained. Good ties, well treated, have a life intrack several times that of untreated, whichmeans an enormous saving. Those of us who had the pleasure of know-ing her were saddened by the death of Mrs.J. H. Waterman, wife of superintendent oftimber preservation, C. B. & Q. R. R. Ourdeepest sympathy is extended the bereavedfamily. Mr. Harry White, Grasselli Chemical Co.,was a July business caller at the plant. freePnxH That Cooke TrainedMen c DO Earn ^JSOOtoWjOOO altbar

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Let me send you Free. this bit? package of VitalFacta*8howin(f what*CookeTrained Men earn, the biKopportunities Electricity of-ferB, and how you, too, canearn i3.500 to ,000 a year.Coupon will bring it Free. Be a Certificated Electrical Expert Electrical Experts; TrainedMen are in big demand atthe highest salaries everknown. The opportunitiesfor advancement and a bigsuccess are unlimited —positively unlimited. TheElectrical Industry faces a bit;ehortaflre of trained men. Itneeiisyoa and will pay you well. Today even the ordinary elec-tricianj the screw driver kind,is making naoney—bi(f money.But its the trained man—theman who knows the whys andwherefores of Electricity—theElectrical Expert — who ispicked out to boss the ordinaryolnctricians—to boas the hiejobs—the job3 that pay .00to J200.00 a week. Fit yourselffor one of these big jobs—beffin NOW. Age or Lack of Exper-ience No Draw-Back You dont have to be a CollegeMan; yuu dunt have to be aHigh School ^aduate.

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White Mountains Community College Advanced Welding Mobile Teaching Lab
Job Training In College
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White Mountains Community College Advanced Welding Lab. Mandatory credit: Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

Image from page 393 of “Royal purple” (1920)

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Image from page 393 of “Royal purple” (1920)
Job Training In College
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Identifier: RoyalPurple_20121206_2107
Title: Royal purple
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Kansas State Agricultural College–Students–Yearbooks Kansas State Agricultural College–Faculty–Periodicals Kansas State College–Students–Yearbooks Kansas State College–Faculty–Periodicals Kansas State University–Students–Yearbooks Kansas State University–Faculty–Periodicals College yearbooks–Kansas
Publisher: Student Publications, Inc. (1946-present). Prior to 1946, Kansas State University.
Contributing Library: Kansas State University Libraries

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Two Out, B/ufj FW QUALITY DID IT Oui• V ORN BRAND SB 1 I >S have pleased iiuls. ;md v hey will not Jis-

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s i. i i) Book theasking. THE ROSS BROS. SEED COMPANY 250 Commerce Street Wu hita, Kansas Acorn Brand Kansas Th e Live Stock State Wichita The LiveStock Market Page S7i THK GIVIN CLOTHING CO. 1 222 Mens Furnishings Ed. V. Price & Co. Clothing . i null nlual measure A full line -f Athletii > f o r men and women TRAIN for BUSINESS T /*you were going to pilot an aeroplane you would / T take a thorough training first, wouldnt you? J If you are going to pilot a business you should be trained as thoroughly for your wc irk as the aviat Join the hundreds of High School Students who take advan- f a course in ur school. Take this short cut I S . Prepare for a Position—not a Job Lets talk it over personally or by letter. Our free Pros-pectus tells how. Write for your copy n The WICHITA BUSINESSCOLLEGE Wichita, Kansas I I 4 – I 16 NORTH MARKET STREET Page 375 He PIONEER MORTGAGE CO. TOPEKA, KANSAS OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 1/ u Iva n c li u ild i n g 1, B i n ■ /. u : ! a i Tf you are con

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(6) Training is one of Isabel’s specialties. She believes that, by training other interns to do the skills she has acquired over the years, “we can multiply our impact to change these issues”.
Job Training In College
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Isabel Ballard, better known as “Isa”, is the always-there-to-help person on environmental issues at the University of Southern California.

She is the campus organizer for the California Public Interest Research Group, a statewide student-run nonprofit organization that works on issues ranging from environmental and consumer protection to hunger and homelessness. The group emerged in the early 1970s to allow students to voice their ideas and make a difference in politics.

At 24, the Pomona College alumna has taken over USC’s CALPIRG chapter. As the campus organizer, Isabel’s job is to recruit USC students in one of the campaigns. So far she’s signed up more than 30.

Last semester alone, the chapter managed to register 1,000 USC students to vote, using strategies such as the “Trick or Vote” campaign.

“As an organizer, I connect people with the tools they need to make change happen,” Isabel said. “From working with the media to lobbying elected officials.”

Image from page 505 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)

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Image from page 505 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp07balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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oung couple willmake their future home. Clarence Grimes, a life-long employe of theBaltimore and Ohio, died at his home here onJuly 8, after a long illness. He was born inthis city sixty years ago and spent his entirelife here. At an early age he entered theemploy of the Company and served contin-uously until ill health interfered with hisactive service. For the past four years he hasbeen an invalid and for the last year confined tohis bed. He suffered from a complication ofdiseases which medical skill could not relieve.Blad, as he was known by the railroad men,was a conspicuous figure about the local yardwhere he served so long an apprenticeship. Hewas always greatly interested in anything forthe good of the Company and popular with theemployes. He was a charter member of thelocal lodge of our Veterans and much inter-ested in its welfare. Blad was a man of finecharacter, a consistent member of the FirstU. B. Church, where the funeral service washeld. A widow and one daughter survive.

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Peter J. Burner, Baltimore and Ohio engineer,died at his home on East King Street, after anillness of over two years, at the a^e of sixty-three. He was born at Luray, Va., m 1856, butwhen a young man came to Martinsburg andentered the employ of this Company. Laterhe was promoted to engineer, in which capacityhe served for thirty years, until he suffered astroke of paralysis two years ago from which henever fully recovered. A recent attack of thedisease caused his death. His widow survives. Keyser Correspondent, H. B. Kight, Ticket Clerk C. E. Littleton, a carpenter in foremanSponsellers gang, was taken to BaltimoreAugust 5 to undergo an operation. On Novem-ber 27, 1918, he completed a job along the lineof road and in order to get back to Keyserearly, boarded a freight train. In boarding it,he bruised his leg, but did not pay any atten-

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Image from page 884 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
Job Training In College
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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f theyhad taken a perfectly good apple out ofyour lunch and put in a wax one—such agood imitation that you even went so faras to attempt to eat it—right in front ofall the fellows, too. There are a few things we would like tosee in and around the Master MechanicsOffice, and especially the following: .■nne and Jim quit razzing each other. John quit talking about May. Alary in on time. Harry have an extension from the phoneplaced on his desk. Rider quit asking when he iscalled to thephone— Who is it? R. M. Stock—get a little peace to dictate. Glad to see H. G. Graffious, terminaltrain master, back on the job after a shortsick spell; also Terminal General ForemanS. A. Irwin. This is a bad time to getsick, fellows, watch your foot! Monongah DivisionCorrespondent, Ann.v Mary UnksThe ticket agent at the Baltimore and()]iio Railroad Station at Grafton, W. Va., is the most courteous, polite and amiableofficial in that capacity that I know and Ido quite a bit of travcUng. This is :t

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THE SOUTHERN BALTIMORES NEWEST ANDMOST MODERN HOTEL imtm -lis % i iru :i Jlftist mention our magazine when vriling advertisers Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, January, IQ24 statement made by a prominent Elkins manat an informal dinner which he and a num-Ijer of Grafton men attended here. Ihave been in Grafton a number of times andhave had occasion to ask this ticket agentquestions with reference to trains and otherinformation. At times when I asked thesequestions he was busy as a bee. But healways answered me pleasantly and with asmile. I dont know the mans name, butI tell you he is a most valuable asset to theBaltimore and Ohio. I have heard peopleall over the state of West Virginia say thesame thing that I am saWng about theman at the ticket window in Grafton. Ifthere were more courteous employes of pub-lic ser-ice corporations in this state andthroughout the country there would be amuch better feeling between the corpora-tions and the general public. Courtesy andservice with a smile

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Image from page 689 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)

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Image from page 689 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp09balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Car Department employes, Sabraton Station Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 70 Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, February. IQ22

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H. B. Pigiran Mr. Pignian has a dear record and it isnot necessary for us to comment on thejjood service which he has rendered; we allknow tliat he is a very able train dispatcherand all the boys like to get out on the linewhen he is on the job, for they know that heis right up to the minute. Passenger Conductor Charles Boyd re-cently returned to his Trader Avenue home,Connellsville, Pa., after spending six weeksat the Park View Sanitarium, Kansas City,Mo., where he took treatment for hishealth. Brakeman B. Baer has returned from ahunt for big game in Sandy Ridge. Baerreturned but we didnt see any deer. Howabout it, Bruce? Cupid is still in the game among theConnellsville Division employes as indi-cated by the following: Miss Catherine Morgan, daughter of Mr.and Mrs. Louis Morgan, Smithfield, Pa.,and W. H. Burkett, Connellsville, Pa., weremarried on Saturday evening, January 7, at8 oclock, in the parsonage oi the FirstBaptist Church of Smithfield, Pa. Rev. R.H. Austin, the pastor, off

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Apprenticeships delivering results for Island students
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The 2014 Apprenticeship Student Outcomes Survey is the tenth annual survey of former apprenticeship students. A total of 5,698 apprentices who completed their apprenticeship training at a BC public or private post-secondary institution between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, were eligible. The survey was conducted from January to May 2014. There were 3,046 apprenticeship respondents throughout the province, for a response rate of 53%.
LEARN MORE: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2015AVED0072-001845

blog
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bit.ly/yXYlZ8Zoologists, also called animal scientists or animal biologists, specialize in observing animals both in their natural habitats and in the laboratory. The goal of graduates with a zoology degree is to learn as much as possible about animal life, including determining how animals originated and developed, documenting the ways traits are passed from generation to generation, discovering how to identify and treat animal diseases, observing patterns of animal habits and behavior, and studying the various ways animals interact with their environment. Zoology is an extremely broad field of study, and graduates with a zoology degree work in all areas of animal life, studying processes from the most simple to the highly complex. Zoologists may study the life functions of a single animal like a bee, or focus on the complex inter-reactive behavior of an entire hive. Zoologists can choose among many different sub-specialties including physiology, cell biology, developmental biology, neurology, endocrinology, behavior, anatomy, evolution, ornithology, entomology, mammalogy, and herpetology. As part of their training, zoology majors learn how to understand genetic, cellular, physiological, ecological and evolutionary principles; develop a solid foundation in related fields of study like chemistry, physics and mathematics; become familiar with current biological science issues; use critical thinking to evaluate scientific evidence; develop quantitative problem solving and conceptual skills to engage in scientific inquiry; plan and execute experiments; study biological complexity and develop an appreciation of the diversity of life; examine the interrelationship of humans and natural systems; access information from various electronic and print sources; apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations; observe and document details accurately and completely; and clearly communicate the results of their observations and studies both orally and in writing. Graduates with a bachelor’s zoology degree can get some jobs as technicians and research assistants, though realistically they will find only limited opportunities for advancement. However, a bachelor’s degree in zoology is a solid foundation that prepares students for graduate school in zoology, cell biology, ecology, wildlife and fisheries science, marine science, and biomedical research, as well as for medical school, dental school, optometry school, and veterinary school. Students who have earned a master’s degree in zoology or a related field are qualified for some jobs as teachers or research assistants, but generally a career as a zoologist does require a doctoral degree. While some zoologists are employed by museums and zoos where they take part in scientific studies of animal diseases and animal behavior, many teach and do research at colleges where they engage in research into animal illnesses and behavioral patterns. Some zoologists also work for the federal government as wildlife managers, conservationists, and agricultural specialists. And a few work for pharmaceutical companies, biological supply houses or other private businesses. Here is a brief list of the kind of jobs that graduates with a zoology degree might work in: Animal Breeder, Acrologist, Agricultural Commodity Inspector, Animal Care Salesperson, Animal Care Technician, Animal Physiologist, Animal Trainer, Aquarist, Biochemist, Biostatistician, Cell Culture Operator, Conservation Biologist, Conservation Officer, Dentist, Endocrinologist, Entomologist, Environmental Educator, Environmental Impact Specialist, Environmental Planner, Environmental Research Technician, Fishery Research Biologist, Fish Culturist, Fish & Wildlife Technician, Forester, Game Warden, Genetic Researcher, Hatchery Technician, Health Information Specialist, Herpetologist, Histologist, Laboratory Technician, Marine Biologist, Marine Mammal Scientist, Medical Doctor, Museum Zoologist, Naturalist Illustrator, Naturalist, Park Ranger, Pharmaceutical Research Assistant, Pharmaceutical Sales Representative, Range Conservationist, Researcher, Science Teacher, Scientific Writer, Technical Sales Representative, Veterinarian, Wildlife Biologist, Wildlife Refuge Manager, Wildlife Rehabilitation Officer. Wildlife Researcher, Zookeeper Assistant, Zoological Researcher.

Image from page 41 of “Carpenter” (1915)

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Identifier: carpenter35unit
Title: Carpenter
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
Subjects: Carpenters — Labor unions — Periodicals McGuire, P. J. (Peter James), 1852-1906 Duffy, Frank, 1861-1965
Publisher: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ith ,000 (at per share) with whichto defray initial expenses. The men willbe paid days wages and when a contractis finished 20 per cent, of the profit willbe divided among those who actuallyworked on the job. The 80 per cent, bal-ance will be banked as working capitalon a pro rata basis of stock owned. War is hell! cried Mr. Casey, repeat-ing the famous saying. It is not, de-clared Mr. Grogan. Did annybuddy iv-ver hear av a sojer comin back fromhell an drawin a pinsion for sivintyyears? Industrial Reconstruction (Continued from Page 21.)industry to which they are allied. Muchcan be done by bringing trade unionideas to bear more strongly upon suchquestions as the apprenticeship system,vocational training, and those other prob-lems which are so vital to the industrialworld. If we follow out the program ofthe American Federation of Labor in thisconnection we will be doing all that canbe required of us. 33 TiiQ CarpQntQr :eNGROSS:ED R:^S0I.UTI0NS on D:RATH of D:EI.:eGATB FIT^G:eRAI,D

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Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course kicks off
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ABERDEEN PROVING GROUNDS, Md. – Officials from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command welcomed 33 students to the Army Management Staff College Civilian Education System Basic Course Dec. 7.

This is the first time the Army has exported the class outside the AMSC campus. The RDECOM leadership partnered with AMSC to bring the program to Aberdeen to begin leadership training in anticipation of the impact of Base Realignment and Closure. The BRAC will bring thousands of jobs to APG in the next couple of years. Read more…

Image from page 185 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)

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Image from page 185 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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raws into thestation, everyone is greeted with his genialsmile and morning greeting, and aftertraveling a little on this train one feelsthat he has become a member of thefamily. » ■ It is very interesting to watch CaptainTaylor as he passes from one to another,showing his personal interest in everyone,and also to note his anxiety and endeavorto get there ON TIME. It gives me pleasure, therefore, to saythis word in commendation of a manwho is on the job, whose slogan is ThePublic be Pleased and which must surelyresult in Stopping a Leak. Relief Department WatchesEmployes Interests IN a recent letter to the superintendent,Rehef Department, Fireman WesleyR. Thompson, Parkersburg, W. Va.says :— I wish to thank you for calling myattention to the fact that in case my dwelUngwas destroyed I would suffer a heavy loss.It is encouraging to know that you have theinterest of your members at heart as wellas the interest of your Department, and Iappreciate very much your interest in mywelfare.

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Conductor G. W. Taylor Baltinwre and Ohio Magazine, June, IQ2J 95 Successful Radio Experiments onMoving Trains, on St. LouisDivision By T. J. Murphy,Chief Clerk, Office of Superintendent Transportation, Cincinnati Special musical programs were furnishedfrom radio stations WLW, Cincinnati, andWHAZ, Louisville, from 8.00 a. m. untilthe train arrived at Louisville. The reception of broadcast concerts,market reports and items of current inter-est, is particularly interesting to the travel-ing public who are obliged to be away from TO W. A. RADSPINNER, specialengineer. General Managers Office,Cincinnati, our readers are indebtedfor the following story of the successfulradio experiment on a moving train. Aphotograph taken on this trip of Mr. Rad-spinner and City Passenger Agent Dickisonis also shown. The application of radio as a means ofcommunication between a moving train anda fixed station or dispatching point, hasbeen proved to be possible a number oftimes. The first public experimental

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DSC_9146 sos
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Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS

Address highlights top priorities and key pieces of legislation

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (January 13, 2016) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today delivered the 2016 State of the State Address in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex.

Gov. Tomblin’s remarks included an overview of new programs and initiatives related to his top priorities as governor, as well as a number of new pieces of legislation he plans to introduce during the 2016 Legislative Session.

Since becoming governor in November 2010, Gov. Tomblin has focused on issues such as workforce development, combatting substance abuse, responsible fiscal policies and job creation. Following are highlights from the State of the State speech and other legislative initiatives of Gov. Tomblin.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Gov. Tomblin has worked to create a positive business climate now and for decades to come, and he remains committed to working with business and industry leaders from a variety of industries to create new investments and bring jobs to West Virginia. Companies from across the nation and around the world are noticing the changes the state has made, and nationally and internationally recognized companies – including Macy’s Amazon, Quad Graphics, Hino Motors, Diamond Electric, Toyota and Procter and Gamble – have chosen to locate, expand and invest in West Virginia.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin added another company to the list of those that have committed to West Virginia. During the address, Gov. Tomblin announced polymer additive manufacturer Addivant has decided to stay and expand operations in Morgantown, saving nearly 100 jobs and adding at least million in new investments and additional opportunities for employment.

While these large investments are a vital part of West Virginia’s long-term success, Gov. Tomblin is also committed to ensuring small business owners have a chance to excel and grow. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced the Self-Employment Assistance Act, designed to make it easier for unemployed West Virginians to get the help they need to open a business. The act allows entrepreneurs to continue receiving unemployment benefits while establishing their new business. This helps owners reinvest in their new venture and employees, while also providing a steady source of financial support for their families.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In working to bring new investments and create jobs, Gov. Tomblin has also made it a top priority to ensure these jobs are filled by skilled and well-trained West Virginians. With the help of his Workforce Planning Council, Gov. Tomblin has established new workforce development programs and strengthened existing initiatives to meet the needs of business and industry operating here. The state has received more than million in federal grant funding to support Workforce West Virginia operations across the state, helping coal miners, their families, and those who have exhausted their unemployment benefits find careers in growing industries.

Through a collaborative partnership among business, industry, education and labor leaders, Gov. Tomblin has established a new Regional Job Matching Database, an online source for both educational program listings and employment opportunities available close to people’s homes. This database will help match students with training programs in critical needs areas and connect them with employers seeking those same skills.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin also plans to introduce legislation that will expand the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ (WVDHHR) Temporary Assistance to Need Families (TANF) pilot program. Through a partnership with the WVDHHR and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, the pilot program was designed to help West Virginians already receiving TANF benefits enroll in college courses, get access to financial aid and work with advisors to begin a new career path to support themselves and their families. With this program expansion, more West Virginians will receive the help and support they need to become productive, successful members of their local communities.

STRENGTHENING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

Gov. Tomblin has dedicated much of his public service to supporting West Virginia’s coal miners and their families. In recent years, both the state and nation have experienced unprecedented downturns in this industry, adversely affecting local operations and devastating the lives of many hardworking West Virginians.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin highlighted ongoing efforts to support and strengthen all those affected by the downturn in the coal industry. The state has submitted an application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), seeking more than 0 million in funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. This competition has the potential to help Boone, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, McDowell and Wyoming counties adjust, adapt and advance their communities. If successful, funding will be allocated to help repair and rebuild aging infrastructure, promote land use planning and hazard reduction efforts and stimulate housing and economic development in the region.

Gov. Tomblin tonight also announced plans to develop of the largest industrial site in West Virginia history – the former Hobet surface mine in Boone and Lincoln counties. At 12,000 acres, this property is large enough to fit every major economic development project in recent history – with thousands of acres left over. The state is working in partnership with local landowners, Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund to find ways to re-develop this site and diversify southern West Virginia’s economy.

ENERGY

In working to ensure West Virginia’s energy sector is strong and diverse, Gov. Tomblin has also worked hard to support development of West Virginia’s abundant Marcellus, Utica and Rogersville shale formations. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin stressed the need to create the processing and pipeline infrastructure necessary to ensure this industry’s continued growth now and for years to come, highlighting major investment projects such as the Columbia Gas Mountaineer Xpress pipeline.

Gov. Tomblin also announced that while the Department of Environmental Protection continues to work on a feasibility study related to the state’s Clean Power Plan Submission, it’s likely that plan will include items such as reforestation and replacement of boilers to improve the efficiency of existing coal-fired power plans.

TACKLING SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Gov. Tomblin has made combatting the state’s substance abuse epidemic a top priority of his administration. As communities and families across West Virginia continue to battle substance abuse from a number of fronts, Gov. Tomblin has invested a significant amount of time and funding to strengthen community-based treatment options and programs to give those struggling hope and get them on the road to recovery.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to support ongoing substance abuse efforts. He announced new licensing requirements for Suboxone and Methadone clinics, requiring medication-assisted treatment facilities to provide comprehensive therapies in coordination with medication to help to treat the root causes behind addictions, rather than simply supplying a short-term fix.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to expand the Opioid Antagonist Act of 2015, making opioid antagonists, such as Narcan, available to any West Virginian without a prescription. This new legislation requires pharmacists to train those who receive this drug on how to administer opioid antagonists and helps the state track those receiving Narcan to help better focus state resources in areas hardest hit by opioid overdoses.

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Gov. Tomblin’s juvenile justice reforms have also made a significant impact on our state’s youth, as he has worked to improve outcomes for those currently in the juvenile justice system and provide early-intervention care to at-risk students to keep them in the classroom and out of the courtroom. During his address, Gov. Tomblin touted the success of 2015’s Juvenile Justice Reform, specifically highlighting positive results of the truancy diversion program.

He also announced the Division of Juvenile Services has reduced the number of kids being sent to out-of-home placements by more than one-third and reduced the number of detention beds by more than 40 percent. So far the state has saved million, and the Division of Juvenile Services is confident West Virginia can double that savings in coming years.

EDUCATION

Ensuring students remain in the classroom for 180 days of learning is just one of Gov. Tomblin’s education priorities, as he is equally committed to ensuring West Virginia’s education system stands ready to provide students with the thorough and efficient education they deserve. In addition, they should receive new learning opportunities that supply the skills and hands-on experience they need achieve long-term success in West Virginia.

To improve upon West Virginia’s educational offerings, Gov. Tomblin has created the Innovation in Education Grant Program, which will not only supply students with special skills and hands-on training, but will also give them the opportunity to compete among their peers on a national and world-wide scale. This new program is designed to reward teachers and schools in West Virginia for innovation and creativity in the classroom. The reallocation of .8 million in existing West Virginia Department of Education money will support new classroom offerings that are designed to help students develop and gain these skills in high-demand fields, such as science, technology, engineering, math and entrepreneurship.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

Throughout his administration, Gov. Tomblin has made sure to enact and uphold fiscally responsible policies. He understands the state is experiencing significant budget challenges, but remains committed to making difficult choices now that will help ensure West Virginia has a bright future now and for years to come.

Gov. Tomblin tonight introduced legislation to pay off West Virginia’s old workers’ compensation debt more than a decade ahead of schedule. This also will remove additional severance taxes on coal and natural gas industries earlier than anticipated, providing much-needed relief for energy businesses struggling with low prices.

In helping to ensure West Virginia’s tax base is both stable and diverse, Gov. Tomblin tonight also proposed raising the state’s tobacco tax by 45 cents to a total of a pack. This increase will not only help discourage West Virginians from smoking or using tobacco products, it will also provide .5 million annually to support health-related costs. million of this revenue will help fund PEIA, ensuring public employees do not see the dramatic benefit reductions initially proposed.

Gov. Tomblin also proposed legislation to eliminate a sale tax exemption that will bring our state’s telecommunications tax in line with 41 other states across the country. This legislation will place the same 6 percent sales tax on cell phone and phone line usage and generate million annually.

With these proposed changes, the 2017 budget Gov. Tomblin presented uses no money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and in fact predicts surpluses beginning in 2019.

Gov. Tomblin will also introduce the following pieces of legislation:

Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Reporting Update

Updates current West Virginia code to reflect 2014 federal law for compliance and continuation of federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Authorizes information sharing by Workforce West Virginia with the state agencies responsible for vocational rehabilitation, employment and training to better align the workforce system with education and economic development in an effort to create a collective response to economic and labor market challenges on the national, state and local levels.

West Virginia Workforce Development Board Updates

Updates the composition of the West Virginia Workforce Investment Council and changes its name to the West Virginia Workforce Development Board to comply with WIOA.

Borrowing from Rainy Day for Unemployment Compensation Fund

Authorizes borrowing in amount up to million to provide additional funds for unemployment compensation.

Controlled Substances Monitoring Program (CSMP) Update Bill:

Requires practitioners (doctors, pharmacists and others) to register for the CSMP to obtain or renew a license.

Creates an administrative fine of ,000 for failure to register for the CSMP, as well as an administrative fine of 0 for failure to access the CSMP as required.

Certificate of Need Exemption for Out-Patient Behavioral Health Community-Based Services

Exempts community-based behavioral health care facilities, programs or services from the certificate of need process contained in W.Va. Code 16-2D-1 et seq.

811 – One Call System

Makes underground pipelines of 4" in diameter and greater subject to "call before you dig" reporting if not otherwise required by state or federal law. Applies to gas, oil or any hazardous substance pipelines.

Membership in 811 requires an entity to provide mapping data indicating where their underground pipelines are located and to respond within the specified time periods when notified by the 811 administrator and be able to mark its underground pipes.

15 Minutes Rule

Requires that drilling, production and pipeline activities are subject to the state’s 15-minute emergency notification law (WV Code 15-5B-3a (b)(1)).

Provisions apply to emergency events that involve a death or serious injuries, unplanned ignitions, fires or explosions and similar serious emergency events (confirmed emergencies) at drilling, production and pipeline sites.

Notification must be provided within 15 minutes to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and include preliminary information regarding the nature and extent of the emergency event, any existence or non-existence of threats to public health, substances involved or released and designated principal contact information.

Transportation Network Company Bill (TNC) – Uber/Lyft

Authorizes TNCs to operate in West Virginia by obtaining a permit from DMV.

Requires automobile insurance and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

Requires a zero tolerance for drug and alcohol policy.

Requires TNCs to have a nondiscrimination policy and comply with nondiscrimination laws.

Office of Coalfield Community Development Bill

Continues the Office of Coalfield Community Development in Commerce (previously in Division of Energy)

Air Ambulance Bill

Provides air transportation or related emergency or treatment services providers operating in West Virginia from collecting more for service from PEIA covered persons than the currently allowable Medicare reimbursement rate.

Repeal Behavioral Health Severance & Privilege Tax

Eliminates the behavioral health severance and privilege tax and limits the sales tax exemption on durable medical goods to those purchased for home use only.

The change is believed to be revenue neutral and will help ensure continued federal matching funds for Medicaid and Medicare.

Reduce Required Annual Severance Tax Deposit to Infrastructure Bond Fund

Reduces the amount of severance tax proceeds deposited into the West Virginia Infrastructure General Obligation Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service on such bonds from .5 million annually to an amount equal to annual debt service, not to exceed .25 million annually.

Personal Income Tax update

Updates the Personal Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws

CNIT Update & Revised Filing Date

Updates the Corporate Net Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws.

Intermodal

Terminates funding of the Special Railroad and Intermodal Enhancement Fund beginning January 1, 2016. The source of funding is corporate net income taxes.

Racetrack and Historic Hotel Modernization Funds Cessation

Ends the Licensed Racetrack Modernization Fund and Historic Hotel Modernization Fund and moves all funds currently in such funds to the General Revenue Fund.

Cessation of Deposit into Road Fund from Sales Tax for FY2016

Eliminates for fiscal year 2016 the deposit of sales tax proceeds into the State Road Fund from sales of construction and maintenance materials acquired by a second party for use in the construction or maintenance of a highway project.

Such sales tax proceeds will be deposited into the General Revenue Fund in lieu of the State Road Fund.

State Aid Formula Changes

Eliminates the Growth County School Facilities Act, which allowed growth county boards of education to designate general fund revenues from new construction (increasing property taxes) for placement in a growth county school facilities act fund.

Adjusts the formulas for the foundation allowance for both professional educators and service personnel.

Adjusts and eliminates certain adjustments to the foundation allowance for transportation costs (increasing bus life from 12 to 15 years and mileage from 180,000 to 225,000 miles).

Adjusts the calculation for the foundation allowance to improve instructional programs.

Eliminates certain restrictions in the computation of the local share applicable to growth county schools.

Infrastructure Fund Excess Lottery Deposit Reduction

Decreases the annual deposit of Excess Lottery revenues to the Infrastructure Fund from million to million for fiscal year 2017.

Increases the percentage of funds that may be disbursed from the Infrastructure Fund in the form of grants from 20% to 50% for fiscal year 2017.

SBA Deposit Reduction

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the annual deposit of sales tax proceeds into the School Building Authority’s School Major Improvement Fund from million to million (was reduced for FY16 to million).

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the School Building Authority’s School Construction Fund from ,216,996 to ,216,996 (was reduced for FY16 to ,216,996).

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

River Valley Community College Machine Tool Technologies and Physical Sciences labs and programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
River Valley Community College advanced machine tool and physical sciences teaching lab. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education/AMPed NH

Image from page 416 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)

A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

Image from page 416 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp09balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ent dat cclton up to Memphis an deydeducts the freights, an dey deducts thestorage charges, an dey deducts the com-mission, an dey deducts the taxes—yes,sah, de ducts got bout all dat cotton andats why Im here.—Boston Transcript. Wishes He Still Hung He hung on the words Of beautiful Kate,And also hung On the old front gate.Theyve been wed now Ten years, Id state.And he wishes hed hung On the old front gate. —Columbus Dispatch. Surely a Catch Applicant—And if I take the job, I amto gel a raise in salary every year? Employer—Yes, provided your work issatisfactory. Ap])Hcant—I thought there was somesort of a catch somewhere.—Annn. A negro soldier coming back to the dress-ing station with his right hand missing wasseen to stop suddenly and start brisklyback towards the front. When questionedas to why he changed his mind, he said: Well, sah, I was starting back to findmah hand. But, he was told, you cant grow iton again. No, sah, but mah dices was in dathand.—Cottony arns.

Text Appearing After Image:
How Many Objects in This Picture Start With the Letter T llt-n–^ a Iictnrc Iu/./lf iii(]i rniitains a number ot objfct.? beginning with ttie letter T. .lust take agoiMl look lit the iiictun—there are all sorts of things tliat begin with the letter T—like train, trap, top, etc.^and all the ntlier objects are equally clear. See how many you cm find. This is n(tt a trick puzzle; nothing!3 Iiidden and you dont have to turn the [licture upside-down or sklcwise. Twenty cash prizes will be given for the 20 best lists of words submitted in answer to this Puzzle. Theanswer having the largest and nearest correct list o( visible objects shown in the picture that start with tholetter T will he awarded tiist prize; second best, second prize, etc. It Costs Nothing to Try \ CM participate in this groat Fun-Game from thetiniest chihl to Criindpa and Grandma. Right after the dishe:*lire done tbs evening gather all the members of your familytogether; give each one of them a pencil and sheet of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Premier Wynne announces how Ontario is helping the province’s aerospace sector grow by supporting a partnership between Centennial College and Bombardier that will help train more people to work in the industry.
Job Training In College
Image by Premier of Ontario Photography
This official Ontario Government photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way.

© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2013

Cette photographie officielle du Gouvernement de l’Ontario n’est disponible que pour la publication par les organismes de nouvelles ou l’impression, pour un usage personnel, par le ou les sujets de la photographie. Interdiction formelle de manipuler la photographie.

© Imprimeur de la Reine pour l’Ontario, 2013

Image from page 15 of “Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana” (1894)

Some cool Job Training In College images:

Image from page 15 of “Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana” (1894)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: biennialreportof3614mont
Title: Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Montana
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction
Subjects: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction Education
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : Independent Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Montana State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Montana State Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ach-ers has caught up with the needexcept in certain fields. These areparticularly in home economics,commercial science, girls physi-cal education, music and voca-tional work. Obviously, however,we need to continue training highschool teachers in order to beready to take care of the increas-ing number of elementary studentsby the time they reach high school. Montana is not alone among thestates in this matter of emergencyor sub-standard certificates. Wefind that practically all states inthe past year issued such cer-tificates. Of the total certificates issued in one state, 34.5% were emergency or sub-standard cer-tificates. Montanas percentage was 12.6% while that for Oregon was 14.6% and Idaho 13.8%. In order to gain and maintain certification, teachers are required to continue with their train-ing. This means they must spend many summers attending universities and colleges. Some haveobjected to the standards set up for certification as being too much a matter of credits and degrees.

Text Appearing After Image:
Practice Teachers at Work—W.M.C.E. -14- However, a close examination of this indicates that it is the only objective way in which teachers can be placed in certain categories. It is not so much to store up vast amounts of knowledge and methods of teaching by attending college at intervals, but rather because such attendance gets teachers out of a rut and serves as an inspiration and a method of securing more confidence in what they are doing. There is nothing more pitiful or harmful than a teacher who has gone stale on the job. Training and Certification During 1951-52 Montanahad 1704 high schoolteachers, 217 principalsand superintendents, 2,600elementary city and townteachers, 860 one-roomteachers and 236 two-room teachers. Of thehigh school teachers, 1,253had Bachelors degrees,394 had Masters de-grees, while three had Ph.D. degrees. Of these sameteachers 555 held life cer-tificates, 1,020 had regularsecondary certificates, 81held special certificatesand 48 held emergency certifica

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 645 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
als. Paid—Was not always looking for in-formation. Jones—Attended to his own affairs. Schmincke—Quit growling. Mt. Clare Yard Correspondent, J. F. Te.^rney To Yard Clerk E. L. Brennan belongsthe distinction of being commended for hisprompt action in averting property damageand possible loss of life on the WesternMaryland. On the morning of August 19, at 12.04a. m., after being notified by phone to stopthe trains, Brennan jumped from a high re-taining wall to the Western Maryland tracksbelow, and waved the signals which broughtthe trains to a stop. Efficiency means greatsavings, and Eugene is doing his bit. We are all glad to see our old friendHenry George, veteran track foreman,back on the job again. A recent sicknessgave him quite a seige. He claims, never-theless, to have lost none of his prestige asa pinochle player, and cheerfully invites allcomers at anytime. Mt. Clare Yard is still at the top incars handled per month in the BaltimoreTerminal; for September, 29675 being the

Text Appearing After Image:
Left: Standard method of protecting highway crossing by the use of flashlight signals, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Lansdowne, Md.Upper right: No. t) passing Lansdowne. Lowei right: Engine of No. 506. Note the absence of smoke Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, November, 1923 63

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

NHTI Advanced Machine Tool and Robotics Engineering Teaching Labs and Programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
NHTI advanced machine tool and robotics engineering teaching lab and program staff and students. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

Kootenay students benefitting from haul-truck simulator training

Check out these Job Training In College images:

Kootenay students benefitting from haul-truck simulator training
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
Advanced Education Minister Amrik Virk and Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett joined College of the Rockies staff and students for a hands-on demonstration of one of the college’s haul-truck simulators.

Learn more: www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca/2013/10/kootenay-students-benefitt…

The Cheerleaders of Cerritos College
Job Training In College
Image by SupportPDX
Cerritos College cheerleaders and Japanese Exchange Students worked together for September 20, 2008’s football game at Cerritos College, Norwalk, California. The Japanese students are from Osaka Japan in an exchange student program in coordination by California State University – Long Beach and Cerritos College. Together, the Japanese Sports Medicine students learn a valuable on-the-job training and be part of the actions, too. Also, check out the photographs from September 19, 2008’s soccer game and softball game that included Japanese students vs Cerritos College students on some friendly games. On related note, there are photographs from September 18, 2008’s track and field with the exchange students from Osaka College of High Technology. You get to view some mean pitches from both of the worlds. Those photographs are also found in the "Cerritos College, Norwalk CA" collection. If you want hard copy on CD-ROM or DVD-R, contact me via e-mail at art.pets@gmail.com. (Michael Oh)

How To Dress For Career Success: Tips From Image Expert Erin Miller

Making the switch from jeans and t-shirts or sweatpants and hoodies to appropriate business attire can be stressful. After dressing casual for so long, putting on a suit can kind of feel like raiding your parents’ closet.

What do business formal, business casual and casual dress for students and new graduates look like?

In this video tutorial, image expert and long-time recruiter Erin Miller (http://www.erinmillerimage.com) explains a number of options in each style for both men and women. Each outfit was carefully selected for students and new grads by Erin from Banana Republic’s Bloor Street store in downtown Toronto.

Special thanks to our models from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management: Commerce students Peter Hu, Herry Dai, Erina Paluka and Teresa Lam.
Video Rating: / 5