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OPPORTUNITY THROUGH SERVICE: 143D ESC PROMOTES ARMY RESERVE AT ORLANDOJOBS.COM CAREER FAIR
Job Training In College
Image by 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)
ORLANDO, Fla. – Soldiers from the 143d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) engaged with thousands of job seekers during a career fair conducted Nov. 18, 2016, at the Amway Center in Orlando, Fla.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tarshekia L. McNear, operations noncommissioned officer, 143d ESC, and Army Sgt. Eddie J. Washington, logistics NCO, 143d ESC, collaborated with members of the Army Marketing Research Group, Florida A&M University Army Reserve Officer Training Corps and local recruiting battalions to educate their resume-wielding guests about the hundreds of career opportunities open to the U.S. Army’s enlisted and officer corps. McNear and Washington shared their first-hand knowledge and experience serving in the Army Reserve with scores of candidates who seek to serve their country on a part-time basis.

Hosted by Orlandojobs.com, the fair comprised almost 100 employers who attracted more than 3,000 applicants living throughout Orange, Brevard and Volusia counties. As the largest Army Reserve unit in Central Florida, the 143d ESC continually seeks self-motivated men and women in the local area to train, lead and mentor Soldiers.

The career fair is one of the many Army-sponsored events connected to the Florida Classic, one of America’s largest college football rivalry featuring two historically black colleges: Bethune–Cookman University and Florida A&M University. McNear, Washington and other 143d ESC Soldiers will actively participate in these community engagement activities leading up to the Nov. 19 kickoff at Camping World Stadium in downtown Orlando.

Photos by Sgt. John L. Carkeet IV, 143d ESC

#GoArmy
#Armyexperience
#Armyteamtampa

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Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Governor Tomblin, Senator Manchin, Community College System, Employers Join In
Dedicating New, Innovative North Central Advanced Technology Center

Fairmont, W.Va. (October 31, 2016) – The second of two state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Centers (ATC) in the state was dedicated today, when Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin cut the ceremonial ribbon celebrating the opening of the 65,416 square-foot, two-story, multi-faceted training facility to host customized workforce development and events at the I-79 Technology Park.

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin comments centered on how partnerships bring about positive changes in our state. “Here in West Virginia, we need a technically-skilled, highly-trained workforce. We need higher education and business and industry to work hand-in-hand. And we need to look around the corner to new innovations and opportunities that will make our state economically strong and competitive for the long haul,” said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. “Today, as we dedicate this state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Center, these innovations and opportunities are all around us. In these classrooms, our students will have the best technology at their fingertips and the opportunity to gain in-demand skills for the jobs we know need filled. As they earn their credentials and start their careers, their families and communities will be stronger – and our state’s future will be brighter.”

“Strengthening West Virginia’s Community and Technical Colleges is something I have been passionate about since my time as Governor,” U.S. Senator Joe Manchin said. “Today’s announcement is a testament to the CTC system, state and local officials, business investors and students who have worked together to advance these programs. The North Central Advanced Technology Center will help innovate our workforce training programs for West Virginia’s businesses and increase our students’ achievement.”

The West Virginia Community and Technical College System (WVCTCS) shepherded construction of both new ATCs (the South Central ATC in South Charleston was dedicated on August 19, 2014) through state-supported initiatives to help provide employers with well-trained, technically advanced workers. The North Central ATC, managed by Pierpont Community & Technical College, offers contemporary classrooms and ample laboratory space for programs such as Applied Process Technology, which includes three pathways (Advanced Manufacturing, Energy Systems Operations and Instrumentation and Controls); Petroleum Technology; Laboratory Assistant; Electric Utility Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; and Health Information Technology. Through collaborative partnerships and private support, the ATC will play an essential role throughout North Central West Virginia in providing the latest technologies, programs, and expertise to increase regional economic growth; focusing on job creation; fostering economic development; and encouraging more students to enter Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.

The concept of authorizing and funding the two ATCs to serve the state’s growing workforce training challenges emerged when Governor Tomblin was West Virginia Senate President and Senator Manchin was Governor. “For our employers to be competitive and our citizens to gain much-needed skills, the Mountain State must be able to have the advanced facilities to produce a highly educated technical workforce,” said Pierpont Community & Technical College President Johnny Moore. “The new ATC in Marion County will be a tremendous asset – a world-class facility offering quality educational programming allowing our workers and employers to be competitive in a global market.”

“Pierpont’s new North Central Advanced Technology Center is needed to prepare students for careers in an expanding technology industry which is poised for growth in West Virginia. By providing quality workforce-training and educational opportunities through its challenging programs, this new facility will contribute to the success of this institution and its students,” said Senator Capito.

Leaders from energy, chemical, healthcare, emergency management and information technology industries are taking advantage of the ATC’s spacious, private and technologically-diverse features.

One such partner is FirstEnergy Corporation. Holly Kauffman, President of West Virginia Operations for FirstEnergy, sees benefits in partnering with Pierpont. “Our partnership with Pierpont is a successful example of how business and education can work together to create opportunities for our next generation to be successful right here in West Virginia,” said Kauffman.

Community and technical colleges in the Mountain State and nationwide are being counted on for leadership in improving energy innovation, advanced manufacturing and healthcare technology fields, as skill needs are rapidly changing and technology in the workplace is becoming more prevalent. To build capability, the West Virginia Community and Technical College System and its industry partners are competitive in pursuing federal training dollars and using flexible state resources such as the “earn and learn” program. Recent federal grant successes include the million “Bridging the Gap” award, a .2 million award for training dislocated workers, and a million TechHire award.

“By 2020, sixty-five percent of jobs will require some form of postsecondary education,” said WVCTCS Chancellor Sarah Tucker. “It’s imperative that we increase accessibility to community and technical education, so that we can supply a highly skilled workforce for our current employers and attract new businesses to our state. The completion of the second Advanced Technology Center will give more West Virginains the opportunity to get the education needed for high-paying, high-demand careers.”

The Governor, Senate Manchin and guests took a tour of the facility to learn more about the programs and state-of-the-art equipment housed at the ATC. Faculty and students were on hand for demonstrations and to respond to questions.

The West Virginia University Army ROTC color guard presented the colors and Rev. D. D. Meighen, retired pastor at Central United Methodist Church, offered the invocation. Property for the North Central ATC was donated by the High Tech Foundation.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN HIGHLIGHTS PROGRESS MADE TOWARD BUILDING UP WEST VIRGINIA’S WORKFORCE
Governor has personally convened Workforce Planning Council since 2013
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (Jan. 3, 2017) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today convened the West Virginia Workforce Planning Council for its monthly meeting, highlighting the state’s recent progress in meeting the workforce demands of businesses and industries.

As part of his comprehensive work to raise student achievement, Gov. Tomblin re-established and re-constituted the Workforce Planning Council in 2013 to coordinate initiatives, leverage resources and plan for the delivery of a comprehensive workforce strategy to ensure an integrated and strategic approach for aligning classroom learning with workplace needs. Gov. Tomblin has personally chaired the Council since that time.

"We have taken a holistic approach to ensuring West Virginia’s workforce is prepared and ready to meet the demands of our businesses and industries," Gov. Tomblin said. "By bringing our top state officials across a variety of sectors to the same table every month for the past few years, we have been able to break down barriers and create new opportunities for West Virginians to get the education and training they need to succeed."

Notable achievements of the Council include:

Implementation of policies and initiatives, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) reform, WV Works, justice reinvestment, felon surety bond and juvenile justice and the Governor’s STEM Initiative;
Launch of education and workforce programs, including My State. My Life., Learn and Earn, Career Pathways, Simulated Workplace, Governor’s School for Entrepreneurship, the Minority Business Expo, Dual Credit and Statewide College Credit Transfer; and,
Establishment of retraining efforts and funding , including the Southern West Virginia Workforce Initiative, Veterans Training Programs, WV Bridging the Gap Consortium, Sector Strategies Job Training Website and Let’s Train WV.

"Going through Simulated Workplace has taught me so much and given me much more insight into a career than a typical classroom setting," said Rachael Peele, a Simulated Workplace student at Fayette Institute of Technology. "Simulated Workplace turns okay students into great students, and great students into leaders."

Members of the West Virginia Workforce Planning Council include Dr. Sarah Tucker, Chancellor of the Community and Technical College System; Dr. Paul Hill, Chancellor of the Higher Education Policy Commission; Keith Burdette, Secretary of the Department of Commerce; Dr. Michael Martirano, Superintendent of the West Virginia Department of Education; and, Russ Fry, Executive Director of Workforce West Virginia.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

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That Was the Year That Was – 1992
Job Training In College
Image by brizzle born and bred
1992 In Technology The first Nicotine patch is introduced to help stop smoking and DNA Fingerprinting is Invented. The continuing Balkan War for the next 3 years between Muslims, Serbs and Croats prompting UN intervention. In The UK Rioting breaks out in Cities including Bristol and in France Euro Disney opens. In the US Bill Clinton becomes president and the largest Mall in America Minnesota’s Mall of America is constructed spanning 78 acres.

The Conservative Party are re-elected for a fourth successive term

9 April – General Election: The Conservative Party are re-elected for a fourth successive term, in their first election under John Major’s leadership. With the government’s victory in the election confirmed, John Major assures the public that he will lead the country out of recession that has blighted it for nearly two years. 11 April – Publication of The Sun newspaper’s iconic front page headline ‘It’s The Sun Wot Won It’, as the tabloid newspaper claims it won the general election for the Conservatives with its anti-Kinnock front page headline on election day. 13 April – Neil Kinnock resigns as leader of the Labour Party following the defeat of his party in the General Election. he had led the party for eight-and-a-half years since October 1983, and was the longest serving opposition leader in British political history.

Diana: Her True Story

7 June – A controversial new biography of Diana, Princess of Wales, Diana: Her True Story, written by Andrew Morton, is published, revealing that she has made five suicide attempts following her discovery that The Prince of Wales had resumed an affair with his previous girlfriend Mrs Parker-Bowles shortly after Prince William’s birth in 1982.

The late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, reacted with "utter abhorrence" to Diana, Princess of Wales’s decision to "wash the dirty linen in public" by disclosing details of the breakdown of her marriage.

An official biography published today describes how Queen Elizabeth was "deeply shocked" when it emerged that Princess Diana had collaborated with Andrew Morton on the book Diana: Her True Story, which caused a sensation when it was published in 1992. She was also dismayed by the Prince of Wales’s decision to discuss his private life with the broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby for a TV programme in which he admitted he had been unfaithful. Queen Elizabeth revealed her thoughts about her grandson’s divorce in a series of previously unpublished interviews with Sir Eric Anderson, the former Provost of Eton College, which were made available to the biographer William Shawcross.

"It is always a mistake to talk about your marriage," she told Mr Anderson, who spent a total of 20 hours interviewing her. Details of Queen Elizabeth’s thoughts on the Royal divorce are contained in Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother: The Official Biography, which was commissioned by the Queen.

In 1992, Andrew Morton’s book disclosed that the Princess of Wales had attempted suicide on at least five occasions in the 1980s, suffered from bulimia and felt rejected both by Prince Charles and other members of the Royal family, including the Queen.

At the time of its publication, it was rumoured that the Princess herself had helped Mr Morton with the book, and after her death in 1997 Mr Morton confirmed that the Princess had indeed been the main source, and had even checked the proofs of the book for accuracy.

In 1995 the Princess recorded a Panorama interview in which she talked about the Prince of Wales’s affair with the then Camilla Parker Bowles, saying: "There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded."

Punch ends 150 years of satire

The editors of Punch, Britain’s oldest satirical magazine, announce that it will be discontinued due to massive losses. It has been in circulation since 1841.

After Years of reports of the imminent demise of Punch had their moment of truth when United Newspapers, owner of the magazine, said it would close on April 8 1992 after 151 years. Staff were told that United had had enough of low sales, disappointing advertising revenue, and losses running at up to £2 million a year. Unless a buyer can be found, what was once Britain’s leading humorous magazine but which became the butt of the lampooners will publish only two more issues.

The old joke, "Punch is not as funny as it used to be – but then again it never was", drew little laughs as it folded.

Four years later the Egyptian businessman Mohamed al Fayed brought it back to life. He funded new exposés on the likes of Peter Mandelson, the architect of New Labour, and the media mogul Rupert Murdoch. But eventually it was costing £40,000 per issue to produce with subscriptions at only 6,000 and Mr Al Fayed closed the title again in 2002. A website still exists for the magazine, reported to have at one time refused articles by Charles Dickens, with many hoping it could make a comeback and regain its cutting-edge image.

Bring back Eldorado

The soap, which cost British taxpayers £10m – with £2m alone being blown on the huge set in the town of Coín in Malaga – only ran for one year before being axed by incoming director general Alan Yentob in 1993. The ‘sunshine soap’, which aired three times-a-week and was based around the lives of ex-pats living in the Costa Del Sol, only ran for 156 episodes from July 6 1992 until July 9 1993. It had been blasted by critics for it ‘amateurish acting’ and ‘very unconvincing storylines’ and is now a byword for a TV show which flops. But BBC staff have urged the new director general George Entwistle to ‘consider’ bringing the soap back to our screens – saying it will help brink a ‘chink of sunlight’ into recession-hit Britain.

The show started with an audience of 8m, dipping to 3.5m, but stabilising at 5m by the time it was axed – which is ‘not bad’ in today’s viewing figures.

The set in Spain once used by the BBC’s soap opera flop Eldorado is now a ghost town. The collection of deserted whitewashed buildings has been preserved by the heat and the dry mountain air in a pine forest 10 miles north-east of Marbella. The purpose-built site provided the backdrop to the doomed 1992 serial, which lasted just 156 episodes before being axed despite costing licence payers more than £10 million. Much of the money was spent on creating the set, which was supposed to replicate the sunshine and simplicity of life in Australian soaps such as Home and Away and Neighbours.

Fifteen years after it was created, the set lies empty except for the former dressing rooms which are rented out to holidaymakers. The 18 apartments and three villas are empty and the once-alluring crystal blue swimming pool has turned green and is used by ducks. Apart from graffiti and beer cans left by local teenagers who hang around the area, the set looks the same as it did when new BBC1 controller Alan Yentob axed it in July 1993. Facades, including the front of what is supposed to be a traditional Spanish church, appear just as new as they did in 1992.

The site was briefly used as a holiday camp but that suffered the same fate as the programme, which was based on the lives of British ex-pats in Spain. Eldorado remains the biggest British television flop and became a byword for failure following its year on the airwaves. It was designed to replace Terry Wogan’s chat show, Wogan, and producers hoped its sex-and-Sangria cheeriness would appeal to viewers fed up with the drab grittiness of EastEnders and the early-1990s recession.

However, the use of mostly untrained actors, the mixture of Spanish and English dialogue, persistent sound problems and appalling reviews sank the programme for good.

It ended as implausibly as it began, with one of the main characters, Marcus Tandy, played by Jesse Birdsall, escaping an attempt on his life with his car being blown up, and sailing off into the distance on a boat, with his girlfriend Pilar.

It has emerged that the set of another abandoned soap, Brookside, is also lying abandoned. The Merseyside cul-de-sac, known to millions of viewers as Brookside Close, was refurbished by developers after the programme ended in 2003 but has failed to attract interest from buyers who are now offering the entire site for £2 million.

Whatever happened to Antonia de Sancha – the kiss-and-tell lover who brought down David Mellor?

No one could blame Antonia de Sancha for being a little peeved. There she is, sitting outside her favourite restaurant in west London, when a passing photographer captures a not particularly flattering image of her. Said image is then published and compared unfavourably with those of the past, in an apparent indictment of the human ageing process.

In fact, de Sancha takes her sudden and random re-emergence into the spotlight with bemused good grace. “What is this all about?” she asks, managing a wry smile. “What am I supposed to have done?”

Nothing, really. The picture has merely made people curious about what has happened in the 20 years since she made a brief, memorable foray on to the public stage, sowing an image in the mind that time cannot wither: David Mellor, the Secretary of State for National Heritage, cavorting with her in a Chelsea FC strip. Behind his wife’s back, obviously.

No matter that the actress’s description of her affair with Mellor was flawed from a factual point of view, it was enough to hole his career below the waterline. A sometimes abrasive and arrogant character, he was the first in a long line of Tory politicians to fall victim to weakness for the flesh during the John Major era. Tim Yeo, Hartley Booth, the Earl of Caithness, Piers Merchant… the tabloid scalps multiplied as the 1990s progressed, undoing Major’s “Back to Basics” morality drive and undermining his government.

For a few weeks in 1992, de Sancha was hot property, managed to perfection by Max Clifford, then king of kiss-and-tell PR. She earned £35,000 from her disclosures, but there was a cost to her theatrical career. Now, she spends much of her time with friends in a small Spanish restaurant on the Portobello Road, apparently underemployed.

1992 Timeline

January – Statistics show that economic growth returned during the final quarter of 1991 after five successive quarters of contraction.

9 January – Liberal Democrat leader Paddy Ashdown proposes a £3billion package which would create 400,000 jobs in 12 months.

Alison Halford, Britain’s most senior policewoman, is suspended from duty for a second time following a police authority meeting.

10 January – The first full week of 1992 sees some 4,000 jobs lost across Britain, as the nation’s recession continues. Almost 20% of those job cuts have been by GEC, Britain’s leading telecommunications manufacturer, where 750 redundancies are announced today.

14 January – The Bank of Credit and Commerce International goes into liquidation.

17 January – In a Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb attack near Omagh, seven construction workers are killed and seven others injured. This is the highest number of casualties in an IRA attack since 1988.

The first MORI poll of 1992 shows the Conservatives three points ahead of Labour on 42%, while the Liberal Democrats have their best showing yet with 16% of the vote.

18 January – John Major announces that the general election will be held on 9 April.

29 January – The Department of Health reveals that AIDS cases among heterosexuals increased by 50% between 1990 and 1991.

30 January – John Major agrees a weapons control deal with new Russian premier Boris Yeltsin at 10 Downing Street.

2 February – Neil Kinnock, Labour leader, denies reports that he had a "Kremlin connection" during the 1980s.

6 February – The Queen celebrates her Ruby Jubilee.

7 February – Signature of the Maastricht Treaty.

8 February–23 February – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Winter Olympics in Albertville, France, but do not win any medals.

9 February – Prime Minister John Major speaks of his hopes that the recession will soon be over as the economy is now showing signs of recovery.

15 February – Neil Kinnock, Labour Party leader, speaks of his belief that the Conservative government’s failure to halt the current recession will win his party the forthcoming general election.

18 February – David Stevens, head of community relations, blames the recession for the recent rise in crime across Britain – most of all in deprived areas.

20 February – Hopes of an end to the recession are dashed by government figures which reveal that GDP fell by 0.3% in the final quarter of 1991.

23 February – The London Business School predicts an economic growth rate of 1.2% for this year, sparking hopes that the recession is nearing its

March – Toyota launches the TMUK-built Carina E at the Geneva Motor Show.

6 March – Parliament passes the Further and Higher Education Act, allowing polytechnics to become new universities.

11 March – John Major announces that the election will be held on 9 April.

Shadow Chancellor John Smith condemns the recent Budget as a "missed opportunity" by the Conservatives, saying that they did "nothing" for jobs, training, skills, construction or economic recovery.

13 March – The first ecumenical church in Britain, the Christ the Cornerstone Church in Milton Keynes is opened.

17 March – Shadow Chancellor John Smith announces that there will be no tax reductions this year if Labour win the election.

19 March – Buckingham Palace announces that Duke and Duchess of York are to separate after six years of marriage.

Unemployment has reached 2,647,300 – 9.4% of the British workforce, the highest level since late 1987.

24 March – Election campaigning becomes dominated by the "War of Jennifer’s Ear".

The editors of Punch, Britain’s oldest satirical magazine, announce that it will be discontinued due to massive losses. It has been in circulation since 1841.

26 March – Television entertainer Roy Castle (59), who currently presents Record Breakers, announces that he is suffering from lung cancer.

27 March – During the 1992 General Election campaign, Conservative MP Edwina Currie famously pours a glass of orange juice over Labour’s Peter Snape shortly after an edition of the Midlands based debate show Central Weekend has finished airing. Speaking about the incident later, Currie said "I just looked at my orange juice, and looked at this man from which this stream of abuse was emanating, and thought ‘I know how to shut you up.’ ".

28 March – Amanda Normansell wins the third series of Stars in Their Eyes, performing as Patsy Cline.

29 March – John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer and father of Princess Diana, dies suddenly from pneumonia at the age of 68.

April – Statistics show that the first quarter of this year saw the economy grow for the second quarter running, the sequel to five successive quarters of detraction, though the growth was still too narrow for the recession to be declared over.

Launch of the music video channel The Box.

1 April – The latest opinion polls show a narrow lead for Labour, which would force a hung parliament in the election next week.

4 April – Party Politics becomes the tallest horse to win the Grand National.

5 April – At his pre-election speech, Neil Kinnock promises a strong economic recovery if he leads the Labour party to election victory on Thursday.

6 April – Women’s Royal Army Corps disbanded, its members being fully absorbed into the regular British Army.

7 April – The final MORI poll before the general election shows Labour one point ahead of the Conservatives on 39%, while the Liberal Democrats continue to enjoy a surge in popularity with 20% of the vote. Most opinion polls show a similar situation, hinting at either a narrow Labour majority or a hung parliament.

9 April – General Election: The Conservative Party are re-elected for a fourth successive term, in their first election under John Major’s leadership. Their majority is reduced to 21 seats but they have attracted more than 14,000,000 votes – the highest number of votes ever attracted in a general election. Notable retirements from parliament at this election include Margaret Thatcher (Conservative prime minister for over eleven years until her resignation seventeen months ago) and the former Labour Party leader Michael Foot.

10 April – Provisional Irish Republican Army detonates two bombs at the Baltic Exchange in central London, killing three.

With the government’s victory in the election confirmed, John Major assures the public that he will lead the country out of recession that has blighted it for nearly two years.

11 April – Publication of The Sun newspaper’s iconic front page headline ‘It’s The Sun Wot Won It’, as the tabloid newspaper claims it won the general election for the Conservatives with its anti-Kinnock front page headline on election day.

13 April – Neil Kinnock resigns as leader of the Labour Party following the defeat of his party in the General Election. he had led the party for eight-and-a-half years since October 1983, and was the longest serving opposition leader in British political history.

The Princess Royal announces her divorce from Capt Mark Phillips after 18 years of marriage, having separated in 1989.

14 April – 10 April – ITV airs the first episode of Heartbeat, a long running police drama set in North Yorkshire during the 1960s.

16 April – Unemployment has now risen 23 months in succession, but the March rise in unemployment was the smallest monthly rise so far.

17–20 April – Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall first opened to the public.

27 April – Betty Boothroyd, 62-year-old Labour MP for West Bromwich West in the West Midlands, is elected as Speaker of the House of Commons, the first woman to hold the position.

5 May – UEFA awards the 1996 European Football Championships to England.

6 May – John Major promises British voters improved services and more money to spend.

12 May – Plans are unveiled for a fifth terminal at Heathrow Airport, which is now the busiest airport in the world.

May – Twenty-two "Maastricht Rebels" vote against the government on the second reading of the European Communities (Amendment) Bill.

17 May – Nigel Mansell gains the 26th Grand Prix win of his racing career at Imola, San Marino. He is now the most successful British driver in Grand Prix races, and the fourth worldwide.

June – Cones Hotline introduced enabling members of the public to complain about traffic cones being deployed on a road for no apparent reason.

7 June – A controversial new biography of Diana, Princess of Wales, Diana: Her True Story, written by Andrew Morton, is published, revealing that she has made five suicide attempts following her discovery that The Prince of Wales had resumed an affair with his previous girlfriend Mrs Parker-Bowles shortly after Prince William’s birth in 1982.

9–10 June – Episodes 1450–1454 of Australian soap Neighbours are heavily censored by the BBC because they contain an incest storyline between the characters Glen Donnelly and Lucy Robinson, who had not realised they were half-siblings when they began a relationship. Scenes involving the story are cut from Episode 1450, aired on 9 June, while Episodes 1451–1454 are edited together into one episode, which is transmitted the following day. The scenes were shown uncut in repeats aired by another channel some years later.

17 June – Almost 2,700,000 people are now out of work as unemployment continues to rise.

25 June – GDP is reported to have fallen by 0.5% in the first quarter of this year as the recession continues.

30 June – Margaret Thatcher takes her place in the House of Lords as Baroness Thatcher, nineteen months after resigning as Prime Minister.

July – Statistics show that the economy contracted during the second quarter of this year.

2 July – The IRA admits to murdering three men whose bodies were found by the army at various locations around Armagh last night. The men are believed to have been informers employed by MI5.

6 July – BBC1 launches the ill fated Eldorado, a soap about a group of ex-pats living in Spain. The series is axed the following year.

10 July – One of the first major signs of economic recovery is shown as inflation falls from 4.3% to 3.9%.

17 July – John Smith is elected leader of the Labour Party.

Official opening of Manchester Metrolink, the first new-generation light rail system with street running in the British Isles.

21 July – British Airways announces a takeover of USAir.

23 July – Three months after losing the general election, Labour finish four points ahead of the Conservatives in a MORI poll, with 43% of the vote.

25 July–9 August – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Olympics in Barcelona and win 5 gold, 3 silver and 12 bronze medals.

27 July – Alan Shearer becomes Britain’s most expensive footballer in a £3.6 million transfer from Southampton to Blackburn Rovers. Shearer, who turns 22 next month, was a member of England’s Euro 92 national squad, having scored on his debut in a friendly international against France earlier this year.

6 August – Lord Hope, the Lord President of the Court of Session, Scotland’s most senior judge, permits the televising of appeals in both criminal and civil cases, the first time that cameras have been allowed into courts in the United Kingdom.

20 August – Intimate photographs of the Duchess of York and a Texan businessman, John Bryan, are published in the Daily Mirror.

27 August – Hugh McKiben (aged 19) becomes the 3,000th victim of the sectarian violence in Northern Ireland which began in 1969.

September – The former polytechnics re-open as universities.

5 September – Italian supercar manufacturer Ferrari announces that its Formula One division will be designing and manufacturing cars in Britain.

13 September – Nigel Mansell announces his retirement from Formula One racing.

16 September – "Black Wednesday" sees the government suspending Britain’s membership of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism following a wave of speculation against the Pound.

17 September – There is more bad news for the economy as unemployment is at a five-year high of 2,845,508, and experts warn that it will soon hit 3,000,000 for the first time since early 1987.

18 September – The latest MORI poll shows the Labour Party four points ahead of the Conservatives at 43%, following the events of Black Wednesday two days earlier.

24 September – David Mellor resigns as Heritage Minister amid tabloid press speculation that he had been conducting an adulterous affair with actress Antonia de Sancha.

30 September – The Royal Mint introduces a new 10-pence coin which is lighter and smaller than the previous coin.

October – First Cochrane Centre opens.

Statistics show a return to economic growth for the third quarter of this year.

3 October – Comedian and television presenter Leslie Crowther sustains serious head injuries after his Rolls Royce veers out of control and crashes on the M5 near Cheltenham. He subsequently undergoes surgery to remove a blood clot on his brain.

9 October – Two suspected IRA bombs explode in London, but there are no injuries.

13 October – The government announces the closure of a third of Britain’s deep coal mines, with the loss of 31,000 jobs.

14 October – The England football team begins its qualification campaign for the 1994 FIFA World Cup with a 1-1 draw against Norway at Wembley Stadium.

15 October – The value of the pound sterling is reported to have dipped further as the recession deepens.

16 October – The government attempts to tackle the recession by cutting the base interest rate to 8% – the lowest since June 1988.

19 October – John Major announces that only ten deep coal mines will be closed.

25 October – Around 100,000 people protest in London against the government’s pit closure plans.

26 October – British Steel announces a 20% production cut as a result in falling demand from its worldwide customer base.

30 October – IRA terrorists force a taxi driver to drive to Downing Street at gunpoint and once there they detonate a bomb, but there are no injuries.

11 November – The Church of England votes to allow women to become priests.

12 November – British Telecom reports a £1.03 billion profit for the half year ending 30 September – a fall of 36.2% on the previous half year figure, as a result of the thousands of redundancies it has made this year due to the recession.

Unemployment has continued to climb and is now approaching 2,900,000. It has risen every month since June 1990, when it was below 1,700,000. The current level has not been seen since mid-1987.

16 November – Hoxne Hoard discovered by metal detectorist Eric Lawes in Suffolk.

19 November – The High Court rules that doctors can disconnect feeding tubes from Tony Bland, a 21-year-old man who has been in a coma since the Hillsborough disaster on 15 April 1989. Mr Bland, of Liverpool, suffered massive brain damage in the disaster which claimed the lives of 95 people and doctors treating him say that there is no reasonable possibility that he could recover consciousness and in his current condition would be unlikely to survive more than five years.

20 November – Fire breaks out in Windsor Castle, badly damaging the castle and causing over £50 million worth of damage.

24 November – The Queen describes this year as an Annus Horribilis (horrible year) due to various scandals damaging the image of the Royal Family, as well as the Windsor Castle fire.

26 November – The Queen is to be taxed from next year, marking the end of almost 60 tax-free years for the British monarchy.

Pepper v Hart, a landmark case, is decided in the House of Lords on the use of legislative history in statutory interpretation, establishing the principle that when primary legislation is ambiguous then, under certain circumstances, the courts may refer to statements made during its passage through Parliament in an attempt to interpret its intended meaning, an action previously regarded as a breach of parliamentary privilege.

29 November – Ethnic minorities now account for more than 3,000,000 (over 5%) of the British population.

1 December – The first episode of the children’s series The Animals of Farthing Wood.

3 December – 1992 Manchester bombing: 65 people are injured by an IRA bomb in Manchester city centre but there are no fatalities.

9 December – The separation of Charles, Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales is announced following months of speculation about their marriage, but there are no plans for a divorce and prime minister John Major announces that Diana could still become Queen.

11 December – The last MORI poll of 1992 shows Labour thirteen points ahead of the Conservatives on 47%, just three months after several polls had shown the latter in the lead. Black Wednesday, which has damaged much of the government’s reputation for monetary excellence, is largely blamed for the fall in Conservative support.

12 December – Marriage of Anne, Princess Royal, and Timothy Laurence.

16 December – Four people are injured by IRA bombs in Oxford Street, London.

Japanese carmaker Toyota opens a factory at Burnaston, near Derby, which produces the Carina family saloon.

17 December – The national unemployment level has risen to more than 2,900,000, with the unemployment rate in the south-east of England now above 10% for the first time.

Jonathan Zito is stabbed to death by Christopher Clunis, a partially treated schizophrenic patient.

23 December – The Queen’s Royal Christmas Message is leaked in The Sun newspaper, 48 hours ahead of its traditional Christmas Day broadcast on television.

31 December – The ORACLE teletext service is discontinued on ITV and Channel 4 to be replaced by a new service operated by the Teletext Ltd. consortium. It had been launched on ITV in 1974 and used by Channel 4 since its inception in 1982.

The economy has grown in the final quarter of this year – the second successive quarter of economic growth – but the recovery is still too weak for the end of the recession to be declared.

Television

BBC1

6 January – Goodbye Cruel World (1992)
7 January – Joshua Jones (1992)
8 January – Fiddley Foodle Bird (1992)
10 January – Grace & Favour (1992–1993)
12 January – As Time Goes By (1992–2005)
27 February – Us Girls (1992–1993)
25 June – 999 (1992–2003)
6 July – Eldorado (1992–1993)
17 September – Noddy’s Toyland Adventures (1992–1999)
29 September – Funnybones (1992)
12 October – Good Morning with Anne and Nick (1992–1996)

BBC2

12 November – Absolutely Fabulous (1992–1996, 2001–2004, 2011–present)

ITV

3 January – The Good Guys (1992–1993)
25 January – The Cloning of Joanna May (1992)
18 February – Men Behaving Badly (1992–1998)
9 March – Junglies (1992–1993)
9 April – White Bear’s Secret (1992)
10 April – Heartbeat (1992–2010)
26 July – TV Squash (1992)
30 July – Me, You and Him (1992)
5 September – What’s Up Doc? (1992–1995)
10 October – Gladiators (1992–2000, 2008–2009)
20 November – In Bed with Medinner (1992–1999)
6 December – A Touch of Frost (1992–2010)
24-25 December – Merry Christmas, Mr. Bean (1992)

Channel 4

7 January – Games Master (1992–1998)
8 February – TV Heaven
11 September – Terry and Julian
28 September – The Big Breakfast (1992–2002)

Charts Number-one singles

"Bohemian Rhapsody /
"These Are the Days of Our Lives" – Queen
"Goodnight Girl" – Wet Wet Wet
"Stay" – Shakespear’s Sister
"Deeply Dippy" – Right Said Fred
"Please Don’t Go" – K.W.S.
"Abba-esque" – Erasure
"Ain’t No Doubt" – Jimmy Nail
"Rhythm Is a Dancer" – Snap!
"Ebeneezer Goode" – The Shamen
"Sleeping Satellite" – Tasmin Archer
"End of the Road" – Boyz II Men
"Would I Lie to You?" – Charles and Eddie
"I Will Always Love You" – Whitney Houston

Drafted: The Mostly True Tales of a Rear Echelon Mother Fu**er – by SPC-4 Andrew Atherton
Job Training In College
Image by manhhai
Drafted: The Mostly True Tales of a Rear Echelon Mother Fu**er
Author: Andrew Atherton
Treehouse Publishing Group, Jul 1, 2014 – Biography & Autobiography – 294 pages

Married for several years and just shy of twenty-six, philosophy student Andrew Atherton receives his draft notice and suddenly finds himself immersed in a military culture for which he is neither well suited nor prepared. After surviving basic and advanced individual training, he is sent to Vietnam as an infantryman. Instead of humping in the boonies with the 101st, however, he is assigned to be a clerk and ends up editing Bronze Star and Purple Heart recommendations and publishing his battalion’s newspaper. And at night, he goes back to the office to type letters home to his wife and stories-both amusing and disturbing-that reflect his awakening to the heroism and horror, tedium and terror, and the incompetence and banal cruelty of life in a war zone.
books.google.com.vn/books?id=yAspnwEACAAJ&dq=DRAFTED+…

—————————————————————————-

Drafted by Andrew Atherton
vvabooks.wordpress.com/2014/05/13/drafted-by-andrew-ather…

Posted on May 13, 2014

Andrew Atherton tells us that his book, Drafted: The Mostly True Tales of a Rear Echelon Mother Fu**er (Treehouse Publishing, 294 pp., .95, paper; .39, Kindle), is a novel. The pseudonymous Atherton was drafted and served in Vietnam in 1969-70 with the 554th Engineer Battalion at Cu Chi and Lai Khe. Any details of his tour of duty in Vietnam must be extrapolated from this novel in which the main character shares the author’s name as well as personal details such as the name of his wife and education.

We have encountered novels of this sort before in the small literature of REMF service in the Vietnam War. I wrote three of them—including REMF Diary—myself. So I am not casting stones, simply describing what a reader will encounter in this book.

Atherton trains as an 11-Bravo, an infantryman, but when he gets to Vietnam is luckily assigned to the 182nd Engineer Battalion at Cu Chi, the place that was built on ground honeycombed by miles of VC tunnels. Atherton ends up pushing paper as an office clerk at battalion headquarters.

How did that happen? Atherton had a college degree, for one thing, as well as typing and writing skills. Plus, the colonel had recently lost his awards clerk and needed a new one ASAP. Atherton filled that bill.

The book begins in basic training, proceeds to AIT, and then to Vietnam. Our hero’s basic training was worlds different from what I underwent at Fort Ord. At the time, I wished I had been sent from my home in Seattle to nearby Fort Lewis to be basically trained. After reading this book, I no longer wish that. The narrative is composed of lightly edited letters Atherton wrote home to his wife and commentary that is almost like a series of essays.

Noted Vietnam War REMF David Willson

Atherton has a philosophy degree from a small Christian college, and is further set apart from the others around him by his serious reading material. I won’t list the books; if I did, it would be daunting. During basic training and AIT Atherton is with mostly marginal people—guys more or less drafted as cannon fodder. Their fates are clear from the get-go—carrying a weapon and humping the boonies as infantrymen in Vietnam.

Andrew Atherton’s job in Vietnam is quite different. It consists of typing condolence letters to family members of men who died in action, many of them due to friendly fire. He also processes awards for Purple Hearts and recommendations for Bronze Stars and Army Commendation Medals.

The essays on how and why medals are awarded are fascinating and smart. He was often given the job of writing letters of recommendation for those men who were being put up for awards. This often involved going out to the field to find the men nominated and interviewing them so he could write up the kinds of letters most likely to be accepted. Atherton’s disdain for the process and for most of the awards comes through loud and clear.

Atherton also makes it clear more than once his “low opinion of this ridiculous war.” This opinion does not evolve only from his being tied to a desk. Atherton’s duties as a writer and reporter for “The Road Paver” get him into the field where he sees some action.
REMFs in Vietnam

REMFs in action in the Vietnam War

He also reports on MEDCAP missions in villages. There is lots of great stuff about asphalt, paving, and road building while the builders are under the threat of taking fire, and facing the ever-present chance of running over a booby trap that could blow them sky high.

Atherton also acted as a courier, taking documents from one base camp to another, which involved many helicopter flights. On one he saves an arrogant newby officer who would not fasten his seat belt from falling to his death.

This book deals with subjects we find in many Vietnam War novels and memoirs: The Bob Hope Christmas show, shit burning, John Wayne, IG inspections, corrupt South Vietnamese government officials, ARVN troops with no stomach for war, and throwing suspected VC from helicopters. But the book is totally free of the clichés that tarnish so many other books. It also contains a long, detailed, and useful glossary.

I highly recommend Drafted for those who wish to learn what the majority of us did in Vietnam, the 80 to 90 percent who were in the rear with the beer and the gear.

Drafted is one of the best of the small heap of REMF books that have been written about that part of the Vietnam War.

—David Willson

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Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS

Address highlights top priorities and key pieces of legislation

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (January 13, 2016) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today delivered the 2016 State of the State Address in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex.

Gov. Tomblin’s remarks included an overview of new programs and initiatives related to his top priorities as governor, as well as a number of new pieces of legislation he plans to introduce during the 2016 Legislative Session.

Since becoming governor in November 2010, Gov. Tomblin has focused on issues such as workforce development, combatting substance abuse, responsible fiscal policies and job creation. Following are highlights from the State of the State speech and other legislative initiatives of Gov. Tomblin.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Gov. Tomblin has worked to create a positive business climate now and for decades to come, and he remains committed to working with business and industry leaders from a variety of industries to create new investments and bring jobs to West Virginia. Companies from across the nation and around the world are noticing the changes the state has made, and nationally and internationally recognized companies – including Macy’s Amazon, Quad Graphics, Hino Motors, Diamond Electric, Toyota and Procter and Gamble – have chosen to locate, expand and invest in West Virginia.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin added another company to the list of those that have committed to West Virginia. During the address, Gov. Tomblin announced polymer additive manufacturer Addivant has decided to stay and expand operations in Morgantown, saving nearly 100 jobs and adding at least million in new investments and additional opportunities for employment.

While these large investments are a vital part of West Virginia’s long-term success, Gov. Tomblin is also committed to ensuring small business owners have a chance to excel and grow. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced the Self-Employment Assistance Act, designed to make it easier for unemployed West Virginians to get the help they need to open a business. The act allows entrepreneurs to continue receiving unemployment benefits while establishing their new business. This helps owners reinvest in their new venture and employees, while also providing a steady source of financial support for their families.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In working to bring new investments and create jobs, Gov. Tomblin has also made it a top priority to ensure these jobs are filled by skilled and well-trained West Virginians. With the help of his Workforce Planning Council, Gov. Tomblin has established new workforce development programs and strengthened existing initiatives to meet the needs of business and industry operating here. The state has received more than million in federal grant funding to support Workforce West Virginia operations across the state, helping coal miners, their families, and those who have exhausted their unemployment benefits find careers in growing industries.

Through a collaborative partnership among business, industry, education and labor leaders, Gov. Tomblin has established a new Regional Job Matching Database, an online source for both educational program listings and employment opportunities available close to people’s homes. This database will help match students with training programs in critical needs areas and connect them with employers seeking those same skills.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin also plans to introduce legislation that will expand the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ (WVDHHR) Temporary Assistance to Need Families (TANF) pilot program. Through a partnership with the WVDHHR and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, the pilot program was designed to help West Virginians already receiving TANF benefits enroll in college courses, get access to financial aid and work with advisors to begin a new career path to support themselves and their families. With this program expansion, more West Virginians will receive the help and support they need to become productive, successful members of their local communities.

STRENGTHENING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

Gov. Tomblin has dedicated much of his public service to supporting West Virginia’s coal miners and their families. In recent years, both the state and nation have experienced unprecedented downturns in this industry, adversely affecting local operations and devastating the lives of many hardworking West Virginians.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin highlighted ongoing efforts to support and strengthen all those affected by the downturn in the coal industry. The state has submitted an application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), seeking more than 0 million in funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. This competition has the potential to help Boone, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, McDowell and Wyoming counties adjust, adapt and advance their communities. If successful, funding will be allocated to help repair and rebuild aging infrastructure, promote land use planning and hazard reduction efforts and stimulate housing and economic development in the region.

Gov. Tomblin tonight also announced plans to develop of the largest industrial site in West Virginia history – the former Hobet surface mine in Boone and Lincoln counties. At 12,000 acres, this property is large enough to fit every major economic development project in recent history – with thousands of acres left over. The state is working in partnership with local landowners, Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund to find ways to re-develop this site and diversify southern West Virginia’s economy.

ENERGY

In working to ensure West Virginia’s energy sector is strong and diverse, Gov. Tomblin has also worked hard to support development of West Virginia’s abundant Marcellus, Utica and Rogersville shale formations. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin stressed the need to create the processing and pipeline infrastructure necessary to ensure this industry’s continued growth now and for years to come, highlighting major investment projects such as the Columbia Gas Mountaineer Xpress pipeline.

Gov. Tomblin also announced that while the Department of Environmental Protection continues to work on a feasibility study related to the state’s Clean Power Plan Submission, it’s likely that plan will include items such as reforestation and replacement of boilers to improve the efficiency of existing coal-fired power plans.

TACKLING SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Gov. Tomblin has made combatting the state’s substance abuse epidemic a top priority of his administration. As communities and families across West Virginia continue to battle substance abuse from a number of fronts, Gov. Tomblin has invested a significant amount of time and funding to strengthen community-based treatment options and programs to give those struggling hope and get them on the road to recovery.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to support ongoing substance abuse efforts. He announced new licensing requirements for Suboxone and Methadone clinics, requiring medication-assisted treatment facilities to provide comprehensive therapies in coordination with medication to help to treat the root causes behind addictions, rather than simply supplying a short-term fix.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to expand the Opioid Antagonist Act of 2015, making opioid antagonists, such as Narcan, available to any West Virginian without a prescription. This new legislation requires pharmacists to train those who receive this drug on how to administer opioid antagonists and helps the state track those receiving Narcan to help better focus state resources in areas hardest hit by opioid overdoses.

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Gov. Tomblin’s juvenile justice reforms have also made a significant impact on our state’s youth, as he has worked to improve outcomes for those currently in the juvenile justice system and provide early-intervention care to at-risk students to keep them in the classroom and out of the courtroom. During his address, Gov. Tomblin touted the success of 2015’s Juvenile Justice Reform, specifically highlighting positive results of the truancy diversion program.

He also announced the Division of Juvenile Services has reduced the number of kids being sent to out-of-home placements by more than one-third and reduced the number of detention beds by more than 40 percent. So far the state has saved million, and the Division of Juvenile Services is confident West Virginia can double that savings in coming years.

EDUCATION

Ensuring students remain in the classroom for 180 days of learning is just one of Gov. Tomblin’s education priorities, as he is equally committed to ensuring West Virginia’s education system stands ready to provide students with the thorough and efficient education they deserve. In addition, they should receive new learning opportunities that supply the skills and hands-on experience they need achieve long-term success in West Virginia.

To improve upon West Virginia’s educational offerings, Gov. Tomblin has created the Innovation in Education Grant Program, which will not only supply students with special skills and hands-on training, but will also give them the opportunity to compete among their peers on a national and world-wide scale. This new program is designed to reward teachers and schools in West Virginia for innovation and creativity in the classroom. The reallocation of .8 million in existing West Virginia Department of Education money will support new classroom offerings that are designed to help students develop and gain these skills in high-demand fields, such as science, technology, engineering, math and entrepreneurship.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

Throughout his administration, Gov. Tomblin has made sure to enact and uphold fiscally responsible policies. He understands the state is experiencing significant budget challenges, but remains committed to making difficult choices now that will help ensure West Virginia has a bright future now and for years to come.

Gov. Tomblin tonight introduced legislation to pay off West Virginia’s old workers’ compensation debt more than a decade ahead of schedule. This also will remove additional severance taxes on coal and natural gas industries earlier than anticipated, providing much-needed relief for energy businesses struggling with low prices.

In helping to ensure West Virginia’s tax base is both stable and diverse, Gov. Tomblin tonight also proposed raising the state’s tobacco tax by 45 cents to a total of a pack. This increase will not only help discourage West Virginians from smoking or using tobacco products, it will also provide .5 million annually to support health-related costs. million of this revenue will help fund PEIA, ensuring public employees do not see the dramatic benefit reductions initially proposed.

Gov. Tomblin also proposed legislation to eliminate a sale tax exemption that will bring our state’s telecommunications tax in line with 41 other states across the country. This legislation will place the same 6 percent sales tax on cell phone and phone line usage and generate million annually.

With these proposed changes, the 2017 budget Gov. Tomblin presented uses no money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and in fact predicts surpluses beginning in 2019.

Gov. Tomblin will also introduce the following pieces of legislation:

Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Reporting Update

Updates current West Virginia code to reflect 2014 federal law for compliance and continuation of federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Authorizes information sharing by Workforce West Virginia with the state agencies responsible for vocational rehabilitation, employment and training to better align the workforce system with education and economic development in an effort to create a collective response to economic and labor market challenges on the national, state and local levels.

West Virginia Workforce Development Board Updates

Updates the composition of the West Virginia Workforce Investment Council and changes its name to the West Virginia Workforce Development Board to comply with WIOA.

Borrowing from Rainy Day for Unemployment Compensation Fund

Authorizes borrowing in amount up to million to provide additional funds for unemployment compensation.

Controlled Substances Monitoring Program (CSMP) Update Bill:

Requires practitioners (doctors, pharmacists and others) to register for the CSMP to obtain or renew a license.

Creates an administrative fine of ,000 for failure to register for the CSMP, as well as an administrative fine of 0 for failure to access the CSMP as required.

Certificate of Need Exemption for Out-Patient Behavioral Health Community-Based Services

Exempts community-based behavioral health care facilities, programs or services from the certificate of need process contained in W.Va. Code 16-2D-1 et seq.

811 – One Call System

Makes underground pipelines of 4" in diameter and greater subject to "call before you dig" reporting if not otherwise required by state or federal law. Applies to gas, oil or any hazardous substance pipelines.

Membership in 811 requires an entity to provide mapping data indicating where their underground pipelines are located and to respond within the specified time periods when notified by the 811 administrator and be able to mark its underground pipes.

15 Minutes Rule

Requires that drilling, production and pipeline activities are subject to the state’s 15-minute emergency notification law (WV Code 15-5B-3a (b)(1)).

Provisions apply to emergency events that involve a death or serious injuries, unplanned ignitions, fires or explosions and similar serious emergency events (confirmed emergencies) at drilling, production and pipeline sites.

Notification must be provided within 15 minutes to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and include preliminary information regarding the nature and extent of the emergency event, any existence or non-existence of threats to public health, substances involved or released and designated principal contact information.

Transportation Network Company Bill (TNC) – Uber/Lyft

Authorizes TNCs to operate in West Virginia by obtaining a permit from DMV.

Requires automobile insurance and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

Requires a zero tolerance for drug and alcohol policy.

Requires TNCs to have a nondiscrimination policy and comply with nondiscrimination laws.

Office of Coalfield Community Development Bill

Continues the Office of Coalfield Community Development in Commerce (previously in Division of Energy)

Air Ambulance Bill

Provides air transportation or related emergency or treatment services providers operating in West Virginia from collecting more for service from PEIA covered persons than the currently allowable Medicare reimbursement rate.

Repeal Behavioral Health Severance & Privilege Tax

Eliminates the behavioral health severance and privilege tax and limits the sales tax exemption on durable medical goods to those purchased for home use only.

The change is believed to be revenue neutral and will help ensure continued federal matching funds for Medicaid and Medicare.

Reduce Required Annual Severance Tax Deposit to Infrastructure Bond Fund

Reduces the amount of severance tax proceeds deposited into the West Virginia Infrastructure General Obligation Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service on such bonds from .5 million annually to an amount equal to annual debt service, not to exceed .25 million annually.

Personal Income Tax update

Updates the Personal Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws

CNIT Update & Revised Filing Date

Updates the Corporate Net Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws.

Intermodal

Terminates funding of the Special Railroad and Intermodal Enhancement Fund beginning January 1, 2016. The source of funding is corporate net income taxes.

Racetrack and Historic Hotel Modernization Funds Cessation

Ends the Licensed Racetrack Modernization Fund and Historic Hotel Modernization Fund and moves all funds currently in such funds to the General Revenue Fund.

Cessation of Deposit into Road Fund from Sales Tax for FY2016

Eliminates for fiscal year 2016 the deposit of sales tax proceeds into the State Road Fund from sales of construction and maintenance materials acquired by a second party for use in the construction or maintenance of a highway project.

Such sales tax proceeds will be deposited into the General Revenue Fund in lieu of the State Road Fund.

State Aid Formula Changes

Eliminates the Growth County School Facilities Act, which allowed growth county boards of education to designate general fund revenues from new construction (increasing property taxes) for placement in a growth county school facilities act fund.

Adjusts the formulas for the foundation allowance for both professional educators and service personnel.

Adjusts and eliminates certain adjustments to the foundation allowance for transportation costs (increasing bus life from 12 to 15 years and mileage from 180,000 to 225,000 miles).

Adjusts the calculation for the foundation allowance to improve instructional programs.

Eliminates certain restrictions in the computation of the local share applicable to growth county schools.

Infrastructure Fund Excess Lottery Deposit Reduction

Decreases the annual deposit of Excess Lottery revenues to the Infrastructure Fund from million to million for fiscal year 2017.

Increases the percentage of funds that may be disbursed from the Infrastructure Fund in the form of grants from 20% to 50% for fiscal year 2017.

SBA Deposit Reduction

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the annual deposit of sales tax proceeds into the School Building Authority’s School Major Improvement Fund from million to million (was reduced for FY16 to million).

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the School Building Authority’s School Construction Fund from ,216,996 to ,216,996 (was reduced for FY16 to ,216,996).

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

DSC_9988 sos
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN DELIVERS STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS

Address highlights top priorities and key pieces of legislation

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (January 13, 2016) – Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin today delivered the 2016 State of the State Address in the House Chamber at the State Capitol Complex.

Gov. Tomblin’s remarks included an overview of new programs and initiatives related to his top priorities as governor, as well as a number of new pieces of legislation he plans to introduce during the 2016 Legislative Session.

Since becoming governor in November 2010, Gov. Tomblin has focused on issues such as workforce development, combatting substance abuse, responsible fiscal policies and job creation. Following are highlights from the State of the State speech and other legislative initiatives of Gov. Tomblin.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Gov. Tomblin has worked to create a positive business climate now and for decades to come, and he remains committed to working with business and industry leaders from a variety of industries to create new investments and bring jobs to West Virginia. Companies from across the nation and around the world are noticing the changes the state has made, and nationally and internationally recognized companies – including Macy’s Amazon, Quad Graphics, Hino Motors, Diamond Electric, Toyota and Procter and Gamble – have chosen to locate, expand and invest in West Virginia.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin added another company to the list of those that have committed to West Virginia. During the address, Gov. Tomblin announced polymer additive manufacturer Addivant has decided to stay and expand operations in Morgantown, saving nearly 100 jobs and adding at least million in new investments and additional opportunities for employment.

While these large investments are a vital part of West Virginia’s long-term success, Gov. Tomblin is also committed to ensuring small business owners have a chance to excel and grow. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced the Self-Employment Assistance Act, designed to make it easier for unemployed West Virginians to get the help they need to open a business. The act allows entrepreneurs to continue receiving unemployment benefits while establishing their new business. This helps owners reinvest in their new venture and employees, while also providing a steady source of financial support for their families.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In working to bring new investments and create jobs, Gov. Tomblin has also made it a top priority to ensure these jobs are filled by skilled and well-trained West Virginians. With the help of his Workforce Planning Council, Gov. Tomblin has established new workforce development programs and strengthened existing initiatives to meet the needs of business and industry operating here. The state has received more than million in federal grant funding to support Workforce West Virginia operations across the state, helping coal miners, their families, and those who have exhausted their unemployment benefits find careers in growing industries.

Through a collaborative partnership among business, industry, education and labor leaders, Gov. Tomblin has established a new Regional Job Matching Database, an online source for both educational program listings and employment opportunities available close to people’s homes. This database will help match students with training programs in critical needs areas and connect them with employers seeking those same skills.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin also plans to introduce legislation that will expand the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ (WVDHHR) Temporary Assistance to Need Families (TANF) pilot program. Through a partnership with the WVDHHR and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, the pilot program was designed to help West Virginians already receiving TANF benefits enroll in college courses, get access to financial aid and work with advisors to begin a new career path to support themselves and their families. With this program expansion, more West Virginians will receive the help and support they need to become productive, successful members of their local communities.

STRENGTHENING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

Gov. Tomblin has dedicated much of his public service to supporting West Virginia’s coal miners and their families. In recent years, both the state and nation have experienced unprecedented downturns in this industry, adversely affecting local operations and devastating the lives of many hardworking West Virginians.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin highlighted ongoing efforts to support and strengthen all those affected by the downturn in the coal industry. The state has submitted an application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), seeking more than 0 million in funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. This competition has the potential to help Boone, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, McDowell and Wyoming counties adjust, adapt and advance their communities. If successful, funding will be allocated to help repair and rebuild aging infrastructure, promote land use planning and hazard reduction efforts and stimulate housing and economic development in the region.

Gov. Tomblin tonight also announced plans to develop of the largest industrial site in West Virginia history – the former Hobet surface mine in Boone and Lincoln counties. At 12,000 acres, this property is large enough to fit every major economic development project in recent history – with thousands of acres left over. The state is working in partnership with local landowners, Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund to find ways to re-develop this site and diversify southern West Virginia’s economy.

ENERGY

In working to ensure West Virginia’s energy sector is strong and diverse, Gov. Tomblin has also worked hard to support development of West Virginia’s abundant Marcellus, Utica and Rogersville shale formations. Tonight, Gov. Tomblin stressed the need to create the processing and pipeline infrastructure necessary to ensure this industry’s continued growth now and for years to come, highlighting major investment projects such as the Columbia Gas Mountaineer Xpress pipeline.

Gov. Tomblin also announced that while the Department of Environmental Protection continues to work on a feasibility study related to the state’s Clean Power Plan Submission, it’s likely that plan will include items such as reforestation and replacement of boilers to improve the efficiency of existing coal-fired power plans.

TACKLING SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Gov. Tomblin has made combatting the state’s substance abuse epidemic a top priority of his administration. As communities and families across West Virginia continue to battle substance abuse from a number of fronts, Gov. Tomblin has invested a significant amount of time and funding to strengthen community-based treatment options and programs to give those struggling hope and get them on the road to recovery.

Tonight, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to support ongoing substance abuse efforts. He announced new licensing requirements for Suboxone and Methadone clinics, requiring medication-assisted treatment facilities to provide comprehensive therapies in coordination with medication to help to treat the root causes behind addictions, rather than simply supplying a short-term fix.

In addition, Gov. Tomblin introduced legislation to expand the Opioid Antagonist Act of 2015, making opioid antagonists, such as Narcan, available to any West Virginian without a prescription. This new legislation requires pharmacists to train those who receive this drug on how to administer opioid antagonists and helps the state track those receiving Narcan to help better focus state resources in areas hardest hit by opioid overdoses.

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Gov. Tomblin’s juvenile justice reforms have also made a significant impact on our state’s youth, as he has worked to improve outcomes for those currently in the juvenile justice system and provide early-intervention care to at-risk students to keep them in the classroom and out of the courtroom. During his address, Gov. Tomblin touted the success of 2015’s Juvenile Justice Reform, specifically highlighting positive results of the truancy diversion program.

He also announced the Division of Juvenile Services has reduced the number of kids being sent to out-of-home placements by more than one-third and reduced the number of detention beds by more than 40 percent. So far the state has saved million, and the Division of Juvenile Services is confident West Virginia can double that savings in coming years.

EDUCATION

Ensuring students remain in the classroom for 180 days of learning is just one of Gov. Tomblin’s education priorities, as he is equally committed to ensuring West Virginia’s education system stands ready to provide students with the thorough and efficient education they deserve. In addition, they should receive new learning opportunities that supply the skills and hands-on experience they need achieve long-term success in West Virginia.

To improve upon West Virginia’s educational offerings, Gov. Tomblin has created the Innovation in Education Grant Program, which will not only supply students with special skills and hands-on training, but will also give them the opportunity to compete among their peers on a national and world-wide scale. This new program is designed to reward teachers and schools in West Virginia for innovation and creativity in the classroom. The reallocation of .8 million in existing West Virginia Department of Education money will support new classroom offerings that are designed to help students develop and gain these skills in high-demand fields, such as science, technology, engineering, math and entrepreneurship.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

Throughout his administration, Gov. Tomblin has made sure to enact and uphold fiscally responsible policies. He understands the state is experiencing significant budget challenges, but remains committed to making difficult choices now that will help ensure West Virginia has a bright future now and for years to come.

Gov. Tomblin tonight introduced legislation to pay off West Virginia’s old workers’ compensation debt more than a decade ahead of schedule. This also will remove additional severance taxes on coal and natural gas industries earlier than anticipated, providing much-needed relief for energy businesses struggling with low prices.

In helping to ensure West Virginia’s tax base is both stable and diverse, Gov. Tomblin tonight also proposed raising the state’s tobacco tax by 45 cents to a total of a pack. This increase will not only help discourage West Virginians from smoking or using tobacco products, it will also provide .5 million annually to support health-related costs. million of this revenue will help fund PEIA, ensuring public employees do not see the dramatic benefit reductions initially proposed.

Gov. Tomblin also proposed legislation to eliminate a sale tax exemption that will bring our state’s telecommunications tax in line with 41 other states across the country. This legislation will place the same 6 percent sales tax on cell phone and phone line usage and generate million annually.

With these proposed changes, the 2017 budget Gov. Tomblin presented uses no money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and in fact predicts surpluses beginning in 2019.

Gov. Tomblin will also introduce the following pieces of legislation:

Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Reporting Update

Updates current West Virginia code to reflect 2014 federal law for compliance and continuation of federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Authorizes information sharing by Workforce West Virginia with the state agencies responsible for vocational rehabilitation, employment and training to better align the workforce system with education and economic development in an effort to create a collective response to economic and labor market challenges on the national, state and local levels.

West Virginia Workforce Development Board Updates

Updates the composition of the West Virginia Workforce Investment Council and changes its name to the West Virginia Workforce Development Board to comply with WIOA.

Borrowing from Rainy Day for Unemployment Compensation Fund

Authorizes borrowing in amount up to million to provide additional funds for unemployment compensation.

Controlled Substances Monitoring Program (CSMP) Update Bill:

Requires practitioners (doctors, pharmacists and others) to register for the CSMP to obtain or renew a license.

Creates an administrative fine of ,000 for failure to register for the CSMP, as well as an administrative fine of 0 for failure to access the CSMP as required.

Certificate of Need Exemption for Out-Patient Behavioral Health Community-Based Services

Exempts community-based behavioral health care facilities, programs or services from the certificate of need process contained in W.Va. Code 16-2D-1 et seq.

811 – One Call System

Makes underground pipelines of 4" in diameter and greater subject to "call before you dig" reporting if not otherwise required by state or federal law. Applies to gas, oil or any hazardous substance pipelines.

Membership in 811 requires an entity to provide mapping data indicating where their underground pipelines are located and to respond within the specified time periods when notified by the 811 administrator and be able to mark its underground pipes.

15 Minutes Rule

Requires that drilling, production and pipeline activities are subject to the state’s 15-minute emergency notification law (WV Code 15-5B-3a (b)(1)).

Provisions apply to emergency events that involve a death or serious injuries, unplanned ignitions, fires or explosions and similar serious emergency events (confirmed emergencies) at drilling, production and pipeline sites.

Notification must be provided within 15 minutes to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and include preliminary information regarding the nature and extent of the emergency event, any existence or non-existence of threats to public health, substances involved or released and designated principal contact information.

Transportation Network Company Bill (TNC) – Uber/Lyft

Authorizes TNCs to operate in West Virginia by obtaining a permit from DMV.

Requires automobile insurance and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

Requires a zero tolerance for drug and alcohol policy.

Requires TNCs to have a nondiscrimination policy and comply with nondiscrimination laws.

Office of Coalfield Community Development Bill

Continues the Office of Coalfield Community Development in Commerce (previously in Division of Energy)

Air Ambulance Bill

Provides air transportation or related emergency or treatment services providers operating in West Virginia from collecting more for service from PEIA covered persons than the currently allowable Medicare reimbursement rate.

Repeal Behavioral Health Severance & Privilege Tax

Eliminates the behavioral health severance and privilege tax and limits the sales tax exemption on durable medical goods to those purchased for home use only.

The change is believed to be revenue neutral and will help ensure continued federal matching funds for Medicaid and Medicare.

Reduce Required Annual Severance Tax Deposit to Infrastructure Bond Fund

Reduces the amount of severance tax proceeds deposited into the West Virginia Infrastructure General Obligation Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service on such bonds from .5 million annually to an amount equal to annual debt service, not to exceed .25 million annually.

Personal Income Tax update

Updates the Personal Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws

CNIT Update & Revised Filing Date

Updates the Corporate Net Income Tax code to be in compliance with federal tax laws.

Intermodal

Terminates funding of the Special Railroad and Intermodal Enhancement Fund beginning January 1, 2016. The source of funding is corporate net income taxes.

Racetrack and Historic Hotel Modernization Funds Cessation

Ends the Licensed Racetrack Modernization Fund and Historic Hotel Modernization Fund and moves all funds currently in such funds to the General Revenue Fund.

Cessation of Deposit into Road Fund from Sales Tax for FY2016

Eliminates for fiscal year 2016 the deposit of sales tax proceeds into the State Road Fund from sales of construction and maintenance materials acquired by a second party for use in the construction or maintenance of a highway project.

Such sales tax proceeds will be deposited into the General Revenue Fund in lieu of the State Road Fund.

State Aid Formula Changes

Eliminates the Growth County School Facilities Act, which allowed growth county boards of education to designate general fund revenues from new construction (increasing property taxes) for placement in a growth county school facilities act fund.

Adjusts the formulas for the foundation allowance for both professional educators and service personnel.

Adjusts and eliminates certain adjustments to the foundation allowance for transportation costs (increasing bus life from 12 to 15 years and mileage from 180,000 to 225,000 miles).

Adjusts the calculation for the foundation allowance to improve instructional programs.

Eliminates certain restrictions in the computation of the local share applicable to growth county schools.

Infrastructure Fund Excess Lottery Deposit Reduction

Decreases the annual deposit of Excess Lottery revenues to the Infrastructure Fund from million to million for fiscal year 2017.

Increases the percentage of funds that may be disbursed from the Infrastructure Fund in the form of grants from 20% to 50% for fiscal year 2017.

SBA Deposit Reduction

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the annual deposit of sales tax proceeds into the School Building Authority’s School Major Improvement Fund from million to million (was reduced for FY16 to million).

Decreases for fiscal year 2017 the School Building Authority’s School Construction Fund from ,216,996 to ,216,996 (was reduced for FY16 to ,216,996).

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

Nice Job Training In College photos

Some cool Job Training In College images:

DSC_3955
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Governor Tomblin, Senator Manchin, Community College System, Employers Join In
Dedicating New, Innovative North Central Advanced Technology Center

Fairmont, W.Va. (October 31, 2016) – The second of two state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Centers (ATC) in the state was dedicated today, when Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin cut the ceremonial ribbon celebrating the opening of the 65,416 square-foot, two-story, multi-faceted training facility to host customized workforce development and events at the I-79 Technology Park.

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin comments centered on how partnerships bring about positive changes in our state. “Here in West Virginia, we need a technically-skilled, highly-trained workforce. We need higher education and business and industry to work hand-in-hand. And we need to look around the corner to new innovations and opportunities that will make our state economically strong and competitive for the long haul,” said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. “Today, as we dedicate this state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Center, these innovations and opportunities are all around us. In these classrooms, our students will have the best technology at their fingertips and the opportunity to gain in-demand skills for the jobs we know need filled. As they earn their credentials and start their careers, their families and communities will be stronger – and our state’s future will be brighter.”

“Strengthening West Virginia’s Community and Technical Colleges is something I have been passionate about since my time as Governor,” U.S. Senator Joe Manchin said. “Today’s announcement is a testament to the CTC system, state and local officials, business investors and students who have worked together to advance these programs. The North Central Advanced Technology Center will help innovate our workforce training programs for West Virginia’s businesses and increase our students’ achievement.”

The West Virginia Community and Technical College System (WVCTCS) shepherded construction of both new ATCs (the South Central ATC in South Charleston was dedicated on August 19, 2014) through state-supported initiatives to help provide employers with well-trained, technically advanced workers. The North Central ATC, managed by Pierpont Community & Technical College, offers contemporary classrooms and ample laboratory space for programs such as Applied Process Technology, which includes three pathways (Advanced Manufacturing, Energy Systems Operations and Instrumentation and Controls); Petroleum Technology; Laboratory Assistant; Electric Utility Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; and Health Information Technology. Through collaborative partnerships and private support, the ATC will play an essential role throughout North Central West Virginia in providing the latest technologies, programs, and expertise to increase regional economic growth; focusing on job creation; fostering economic development; and encouraging more students to enter Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.

The concept of authorizing and funding the two ATCs to serve the state’s growing workforce training challenges emerged when Governor Tomblin was West Virginia Senate President and Senator Manchin was Governor. “For our employers to be competitive and our citizens to gain much-needed skills, the Mountain State must be able to have the advanced facilities to produce a highly educated technical workforce,” said Pierpont Community & Technical College President Johnny Moore. “The new ATC in Marion County will be a tremendous asset – a world-class facility offering quality educational programming allowing our workers and employers to be competitive in a global market.”

“Pierpont’s new North Central Advanced Technology Center is needed to prepare students for careers in an expanding technology industry which is poised for growth in West Virginia. By providing quality workforce-training and educational opportunities through its challenging programs, this new facility will contribute to the success of this institution and its students,” said Senator Capito.

Leaders from energy, chemical, healthcare, emergency management and information technology industries are taking advantage of the ATC’s spacious, private and technologically-diverse features.

One such partner is FirstEnergy Corporation. Holly Kauffman, President of West Virginia Operations for FirstEnergy, sees benefits in partnering with Pierpont. “Our partnership with Pierpont is a successful example of how business and education can work together to create opportunities for our next generation to be successful right here in West Virginia,” said Kauffman.

Community and technical colleges in the Mountain State and nationwide are being counted on for leadership in improving energy innovation, advanced manufacturing and healthcare technology fields, as skill needs are rapidly changing and technology in the workplace is becoming more prevalent. To build capability, the West Virginia Community and Technical College System and its industry partners are competitive in pursuing federal training dollars and using flexible state resources such as the “earn and learn” program. Recent federal grant successes include the million “Bridging the Gap” award, a .2 million award for training dislocated workers, and a million TechHire award.

“By 2020, sixty-five percent of jobs will require some form of postsecondary education,” said WVCTCS Chancellor Sarah Tucker. “It’s imperative that we increase accessibility to community and technical education, so that we can supply a highly skilled workforce for our current employers and attract new businesses to our state. The completion of the second Advanced Technology Center will give more West Virginains the opportunity to get the education needed for high-paying, high-demand careers.”

The Governor, Senate Manchin and guests took a tour of the facility to learn more about the programs and state-of-the-art equipment housed at the ATC. Faculty and students were on hand for demonstrations and to respond to questions.

The West Virginia University Army ROTC color guard presented the colors and Rev. D. D. Meighen, retired pastor at Central United Methodist Church, offered the invocation. Property for the North Central ATC was donated by the High Tech Foundation.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

DSC_6759
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Governor Tomblin, Senator Manchin, Community College System, Employers Join In
Dedicating New, Innovative North Central Advanced Technology Center

Fairmont, W.Va. (October 31, 2016) – The second of two state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Centers (ATC) in the state was dedicated today, when Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin cut the ceremonial ribbon celebrating the opening of the 65,416 square-foot, two-story, multi-faceted training facility to host customized workforce development and events at the I-79 Technology Park.

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin comments centered on how partnerships bring about positive changes in our state. “Here in West Virginia, we need a technically-skilled, highly-trained workforce. We need higher education and business and industry to work hand-in-hand. And we need to look around the corner to new innovations and opportunities that will make our state economically strong and competitive for the long haul,” said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. “Today, as we dedicate this state-of-the-art Advanced Technology Center, these innovations and opportunities are all around us. In these classrooms, our students will have the best technology at their fingertips and the opportunity to gain in-demand skills for the jobs we know need filled. As they earn their credentials and start their careers, their families and communities will be stronger – and our state’s future will be brighter.”

“Strengthening West Virginia’s Community and Technical Colleges is something I have been passionate about since my time as Governor,” U.S. Senator Joe Manchin said. “Today’s announcement is a testament to the CTC system, state and local officials, business investors and students who have worked together to advance these programs. The North Central Advanced Technology Center will help innovate our workforce training programs for West Virginia’s businesses and increase our students’ achievement.”

The West Virginia Community and Technical College System (WVCTCS) shepherded construction of both new ATCs (the South Central ATC in South Charleston was dedicated on August 19, 2014) through state-supported initiatives to help provide employers with well-trained, technically advanced workers. The North Central ATC, managed by Pierpont Community & Technical College, offers contemporary classrooms and ample laboratory space for programs such as Applied Process Technology, which includes three pathways (Advanced Manufacturing, Energy Systems Operations and Instrumentation and Controls); Petroleum Technology; Laboratory Assistant; Electric Utility Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; and Health Information Technology. Through collaborative partnerships and private support, the ATC will play an essential role throughout North Central West Virginia in providing the latest technologies, programs, and expertise to increase regional economic growth; focusing on job creation; fostering economic development; and encouraging more students to enter Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.

The concept of authorizing and funding the two ATCs to serve the state’s growing workforce training challenges emerged when Governor Tomblin was West Virginia Senate President and Senator Manchin was Governor. “For our employers to be competitive and our citizens to gain much-needed skills, the Mountain State must be able to have the advanced facilities to produce a highly educated technical workforce,” said Pierpont Community & Technical College President Johnny Moore. “The new ATC in Marion County will be a tremendous asset – a world-class facility offering quality educational programming allowing our workers and employers to be competitive in a global market.”

“Pierpont’s new North Central Advanced Technology Center is needed to prepare students for careers in an expanding technology industry which is poised for growth in West Virginia. By providing quality workforce-training and educational opportunities through its challenging programs, this new facility will contribute to the success of this institution and its students,” said Senator Capito.

Leaders from energy, chemical, healthcare, emergency management and information technology industries are taking advantage of the ATC’s spacious, private and technologically-diverse features.

One such partner is FirstEnergy Corporation. Holly Kauffman, President of West Virginia Operations for FirstEnergy, sees benefits in partnering with Pierpont. “Our partnership with Pierpont is a successful example of how business and education can work together to create opportunities for our next generation to be successful right here in West Virginia,” said Kauffman.

Community and technical colleges in the Mountain State and nationwide are being counted on for leadership in improving energy innovation, advanced manufacturing and healthcare technology fields, as skill needs are rapidly changing and technology in the workplace is becoming more prevalent. To build capability, the West Virginia Community and Technical College System and its industry partners are competitive in pursuing federal training dollars and using flexible state resources such as the “earn and learn” program. Recent federal grant successes include the million “Bridging the Gap” award, a .2 million award for training dislocated workers, and a million TechHire award.

“By 2020, sixty-five percent of jobs will require some form of postsecondary education,” said WVCTCS Chancellor Sarah Tucker. “It’s imperative that we increase accessibility to community and technical education, so that we can supply a highly skilled workforce for our current employers and attract new businesses to our state. The completion of the second Advanced Technology Center will give more West Virginains the opportunity to get the education needed for high-paying, high-demand careers.”

The Governor, Senate Manchin and guests took a tour of the facility to learn more about the programs and state-of-the-art equipment housed at the ATC. Faculty and students were on hand for demonstrations and to respond to questions.

The West Virginia University Army ROTC color guard presented the colors and Rev. D. D. Meighen, retired pastor at Central United Methodist Church, offered the invocation. Property for the North Central ATC was donated by the High Tech Foundation.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

DSC_0445
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
GOVERNOR TOMBLIN ANNOUNCES
MINECRAFT COMPETITION WINNERS
Highlights STEM accomplishments,
proclaims STEM Day in West Virginia

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (November 29, 2016) – After proclaiming today STEM Day in West Virginia, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin announced the student winners of the State Capitol Minecraft Design/Build contest. This contest was a collaborative effort involving the Governor’s STEM Initiative, the West Virginia Department of Education, the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts and the Education Alliance.

The competition, which began in May, was open to West Virginia students, grades PreK-12 and challenged participants to either create a new version of the state capitol building or produce a replica of the current complex using Minecraft. Governor Tomblin recognized both individual and team winners from each category.

"I applaud each student who took the time to create their own versions of our state capitol," said Gov. Tomblin. "More than once this summer, I saw students exploring the capitol grounds, taking notes and preparing for the hours they would spend creating their submissions. Their efforts certainly paid off. It’s important that we encourage our students to develop the skills and interests that build a foundation for future success in STEM fields – into college, training programs and careers."

The students recognized today received more than ,100 in gift cards to be used for educational purposes. In addition, Microsoft is providing a Surface Pro 4 to each of the top two winners for each category-Asad Ranavaya from Cabell Midland High School in Cabell County and Justin Hardwick from East Fairmont High School in Marion County.

Before the student recognition ceremony, Governor Tomblin hosted a roundtable discussion with state and education officials, along with students, to highlight the efforts and successes of his STEM Council and STEM Initiative.

"There is a critical need to focus our state’s attention on science, technology, engineering and mathematics," said Gov. Tomblin. "West Virginia’s workforce needs are evolving and in order to fill jobs in the future, all of us – from K-12, higher education, and workforce and economic development – must work together to provide our students access to the best STEM education opportunities."

The Governor STEM Council was established to develop specialized STEM education opportunities for West Virginia students and increase the number of graduates in these fields. The council is comprised of business and education leaders across the state.

The following students were recognized today by Governor Tomblin:

Benjamin Reed, Village of Barboursville Elementary School
Zane Spencer, Cherry River Elementary School
Camdyn Hill, Terra Alta/East Preston Middle School
Madison McCloud, Madison Middle School
Elizabeth Shaf, Charleston Catholic High School
Jensen Tucker, Grafton High School
Austin Ballenger, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Gabe Coleman, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Ian Morrison, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Savion Myers, Eastern Greenbrier Middle School
Jackson Stewart, Washington High School
Jacob Thrasher, Washington High School
Matteo Cerasoli, Washington High School
Asad Ranavaya, Cabell Midland High School
Justin Hardwick, East Fairmont High School

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

Nice Job Training In College photos

Some cool Job Training In College images:

Moler_Men_recruits-1
Job Training In College
Image by Jim Surkamp

Civil War Scholars: The Powerful Experience of the War-Torn, Northern Shenandoah Valley

Newton D. Baker’s “Most” Divided Clan (Pt. 1 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
By Jim Surkamp on February 2, 2016 in Jefferson County

NEWTON D. BAKER’S “MOST” DIVIDED CLAN (Pt. 1 of 4) by Jim Surkamp

Cousins of Co_F_FINAL

SUMMARY:
Each generation rebels against the former. The Bakers of Maryland, Shepherdstown and finally Martinsburg – muddled thru traditional inter-generational discords like a schooner pitching through high seas. Elias Baker one-upped a father who deserted his children by being a good father. His son, antsy nineteen-year-old Newton D. Baker rebelled against his doting father, a soon-to-be appointed federal postmaster in Shepherdstown, by riding off and enlisting in Company F of the First Virginia Cavalry – Confederate – following the recent example of a figurative avalanche of nine of his blood cousins into that same company. Still more cousins would enlist.

Life in a wartime saddle matured him for four years: battles, imprisonment, routine heroics, his wounding, having a fine bay mare shot from under him, (and later, a suspiciously extravagant compensation package for this lost horse offered by a cousin with clout), and, finally, coming home. Bearing witness to so many in need of medical care begat Newton’s post-war calling as a doctor. He finished training, was mentored by Shepherdstown neighbor and physician, John Quigley, who transferred his practice to the young up-and-comer.

But burgeoning ambition called away the next son of a Baker – Newton D. Baker Jr. Reading voraciously and eschewing the stethoscope and his father’s beckoning practice, off Junior went to Cleveland – joking that he was being a carpetbagger invading the Northern states – ascending a skyward ladder to heights of acclaim unprecedented for the Bakers. He was the progressive mayor of Cleveland; then, after more promotions, President Woodrow Wilson approached his fellow Virginian and appointed Newton D. Baker, Jr. to be our Secretary of War, managing the best he could the American role in the calamitous First World War. Today we have the Newton D. Baker Veterans’ Hospital in Martinsburg to his fond memory.

THE BAKERS’ REGENERATION:

The Bakers once of Shepherdstown were busy each generation rebelling in full measure from the former. Each time, the new generation would reckon a new guiding star deemed a wiser calling than their parents.

The Baker generations progressed from a single outcast, who led one Baker generation, then to another family member, three cycles later, who was even considered in 1932 a potential candidate for the Presidency.

GENERATION 1: THE UNFORGIVEN ELIAS BAKER, SR. (1785-1863) IN BAKERESVILLE, WASHINGTON COUNTY, MD.:

Elias_Baker_Sr_Unforgiven

Called by one family biographer, C. H. Cramer, “a soft spot in the family tree,” he wrote: “(They) could take no pride in this Elias Baker, an Englishman, who settled about 1760 in Maryland near the later site of the battle of Antietam. There Elias married, started a family (ten boys and five girls), and then deserted it.” – Cramer, p. 15.

GENERATION 2: ELIAS BAKER, JR. (1811-1867) – FAMILY MAN, SADDLER AND POSTMASTER:

Van_Clevesville_Saddles_Baker

Starting anew, Elias Baker, Jr. left Bakersville, Maryland, the family’s ancestral lands, and crossed the Potomac to Berkeley County, Va. He found his lifemate, Mary Ann Billmyer (1816-1896) living at the Millbrook farm, one of thirteen children to her prosperous parents, Martin and Susan Billmyer. She and her siblings were struggling with their farms after the death in the mid-1830s of both their parents.

She and Elias married November, 1840 and first lived in Appomatox County, Elias making and fixing saddles. The next decade brought the deaths of three of Mary Ann’s older brothers and a sister, while their own young family grew by two sons and a daughter. The first-born in 1841 had brown hair and blue eyes and he was named Newton Diehl Baker, who this story is about.

The Bakers moved in March, 1850 to Van Clevesville and closer to her large family. Susan Baker’s parents and older brothers had grown wheat and had a booming business at their own mill across the road from their home. This much-in-demand ground wheat would be carried across the toll bridge that Mary Ann’s brother, David, largely owned at Shepherdstown and was shipped by canal boats to Georgetown and overseas buyers.

The_Shepherdstown-Bakers_1850s

In March, 1857, they came to Shepherdstown and Mary Ann Baker used family inheritance to buy out brother David’s boat store at the northeast corner of Church and German Street.

In March, 1858, she also bought – seven, quick-succession doors to the west on German Street – what would become the Baker residence well into the 20th century – room enough for their family of eight children: Newton, Ann Katherine, Cora Louise, Martin Billmyer, Solomon Elmer, William Elias Fink, Alban Howard, and Henry Seaton. – A. D. Kenamond, “Prominent Men of Shepherdstown 1762-1962.” p. 21.

WAR CLOUDS AND GENERATION GAPS:

The John Brown raid and trial in October, 1859 and the subsequent hangings of seven of the raiders up to March, 1860 set the stage for the presidential election that coming fall. According to Andrew Hunter, the prosecutor in the John Brown trial, the fright that came to locals with the John Brown raid was that it was, to them really, the overture to what they plainly called The War Against Slavery. – Andrew Hunter. Sept 5, 1887 New Orleans Times Democrat.

Lincoln’s election in November, 1860 and the Deep South states’ seceding despite Lincoln’s warnings – brought the nation and Jefferson Countians to the edge of the precipice.

In Shepherdstown, the older generation, born around 1800 – such as Dr. John and Mary Quigley, Elias and Susan Baker, and even Robert E. Lee’s first cousin, Edmund Jennings Lee – strongly voiced their opposition to any such plan for Virginia to secede from the Union.

Netta_Edmund_D

The daughter of Edmund J. Lee, teen-aged Henrietta Edmonia or “Netta,” wrote later of a run-in in early 1861 between her father and brother Edmund:
I remember very vividly a gathering when Uncle Charles Lee was present. He was my father’s younger brother and a lawyer by profession. He came from Washington to consult Father regarding his resignation of the position he was holding in one of the departments of the United States government.

Two_Lees_D

My brother, Edmund, Jr. and a boy of about fifteen years, who was standing by during the conversation, said: “Why Uncle Charles, could you not get the same position in the Confederate States government?” Father turned quickly, saying: “You young rascal,” strongly emphasizing the broad “a” as was his habit, “let me hear you talk about any Confederate States and I will skin you!” – Diary of Nettie Lee, pp. 4-5.

mar_1861_moon

When war became unavoidable, David Hunter Strother of Martinsburg, who was a Unionist from another divided family and later an officer in the Federal army, was observing the moods of Jefferson County’s people. The younger were excited but: “I thought I could discern in the eyes of some of the older and wiser (African-Americans) a gleam of anxious speculation – a silent and tremulous questioning of the future. . . There were also some among the white citizens who stood aloof in silence and sadness, protesting against the proceeding by an occasional bitter sigh or significant sneer, but nothing more.

But the thirst for adventure was almost unquenchable among the young, having been prepared for adventure their entire lives.

Wrote one of these young local cavalrymen in later years:
Young men of the present day, who flourish in fine buggies, smoke cigars and cigarettes, part their hair in the middle, and occasionally greet “inspiring bold John Barley Corn,” can ill appreciate the pastimes and pleasures of the youth of a generation ago, when the horse, the gun, and the dog were the ne plus ultra of masculine aspirations. Those good old days of innocent sports and recreations, are still valued as the brightest and happiest in life. Alas! of our little group, that often chased the squirrel from tree-to-tree and made the forests ring with volleys of musketry, or startled the partridge from its repose in the fields, but two are left to tell the tale. That acquaintance with the horse, which began in early childhood, soon ripened into affection, and the horse and rider were one in life and action. – Baylor, p. 15.
NOTE “inspiring, bold John Barley Corn” is taken from Robert Burns’ poem “Tam O-Shanter.” POEM’S FULL TEXT UNDER “REFERENCES.”

Wrote another local man who joined the Federal cause:

David_Hunter_Strother_D

Horses and firearms are their playthings from childhood. Impatient of the restraints of school houses and work shops they seek life and pleasure in the soil, and thus early learn the topography of nature, the ways of the fields and forests, swamps, and mountains. Their social and political life, but little restrained by law or its usage, develops a vigorous individuality. For the most part, ignorant of the luxuries and refinements of cities, they prefer bacon and Scotch whisky to venison and champagne. Tall, athletic, rough, and full of fire and vitality, the half-horse, half-alligator type still predominates . . .
Strother, p. 6.

Young men, who from the moment their feet could reach the stirrups were attuned for adventure and to the dismay of their sober parents, quickly responded to the call to arms when President Lincoln put out a call for 75,000 volunteers to bring all the seceding states back. By mid-April, 1861, young men in Virginia had to choose to be one of those volunteers or rebel. While about 128 African Americans from the County would join the United States Colored Troops, some Unionist County boys who were white left the area to escape the threats of imprisonment and more from the area firebrand, Turner Ashby. But most of the young men rebelled.

Wrote one who witnessed events in Charlestown, Va.:
Alas! poor boy, what sense of duty or prudent counsels could hold him in the whirl of this moral maelstrom? What did he care for the vague terror of an indictment for treason, or the misty doctrine of Federal supremacy? What did he know of nationality beyond the circle of friends and kindred? What was his sneaking, apologetic, unsympathetic life worth after all?

But according to my judgment the greater number of these young volunteers were moved neither by social pressure nor political prejudice. The all-pervading love of adventure and fighting instincts were the most successful recruiting officers of the occasion. For they had heard of battles, and had longed to follow to the field some warlike lord – so at the first roll of the drum they rushed cheerily from school house and office, counter and work shop, field and fireside, earnest, eager, reckless fellows, marching with a free and vigorous step, sitting their horses like wild Pawnees, most admirable material for a rebellion, just as good soldiers for the Government if perchance the rub-a-dub of the Union drums had first aroused their martial ardor. – Strother, Excerpted from “Personal Recollections of the War,” from “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine,” July, 1866, Vol. XXXIV, p. 141.

WHAT THE YOUNG LADIES THOUGHT WAS DECISIVE:

While there were still a few men found who stubbornly struggled against the sweeping current, the women of all ages and conditions threw themselves into it without hesitation or reserve. His schoolmates and companions who had already donned ‘the gray’ scarce concealed their scorn. His sisters, rallied, reproached, and pouted, blushing to acknowledge his ignominy. His Jeannette, lately so tender and loving, now refused his hand in the dance, and, passing him with nose in air, bestowed her smiles and her bouquet upon some gallant rival with belt and buttons. Day-after-day he saw the baskets loaded with choice viands, roasted fowls, pickles, cakes, and potted sweetmeats, but not for him. Wherever he went there was a braiding of caps and coats, a gathering of flowers and weaving of wreaths, but none for him – no scented and embroidered handkerchiefs waved from carriage-windows as he rode by. The genial flood of social sympathy upon which he had hitherto floated so blandly had left him stranded on the icy shore. Then come the cheering regiments with their drums and banners, the snorting squadrons of glossy prancing steeds the jingling of knightly spurs, the stirring blast of the trumpets. There they went – companionship, love, life, glory, all sweeping by to Harper’s Ferry! – Strother, Excerpted from “Personal Recollections of the War,” from “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine,” July, 1866, Vol. XXXIV, p. 141.

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Sewing societies were organized, and delicate hands which had never before engaged in ruder labor than the hemming of a ruffle now bled in the strife with gray jeans and tent cloth. Haversacks, knapsacks, caps, jackets, and tents were manufactured by hundreds and dozens.

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The gift most in vogue from a young lady to her favored knight was a headdress imitated from those worn by the British troops in India and called a Havelock, (that Gen. Jackson later forebade because it made his men easier targets.-ED). Laden with musket, sabre, pistol, and bowie-knife, no youth considered his armament complete unless he had one of these silly clouts stretched over his hat.

Woe to the youth who did not need a Havelock; who, owing to natural indisposition or the prudent counsel of a father or a friend, hesitated to join the army of the South. The curse of Clan Alpin on those who should prove recreant to the sign of the fiery cross was mere dramatic noise compared with the curse that blighted his soul. – Ibid. p. 141.

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Many of these young men, including several men from the Moler clan were in the line that first, fateful day on April 18, 1861, when the local militia assembled to seize the federal armory, with the inked signatures still damp in Richmond on the voted document by Virginia to secede. The armory burned before they seized it, but hard drilling began just days later at Bolivar Heights, under the unknown, erstwhile professor at Virginia Military Institute, Col. Thomas Jonathan Jackson.

THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1861 – SHEPHERDSTOWN, VA – PRESSURE MOUNTS ON NEWTON BAKER TO ENLIST IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY:

That day, nine of Newton’s cousins rode away from their farm steads in Berkeley and Jefferson County to join Company F of the newly-formed Shepherdstown Troop of 1st Virginia Cavalry, commanded by 6’2” slender, dark-haired, full-bearded 37-year-old William Augustine Morgan, who lived with his family at their home, Falling Springs, just south of Shepherdstown.

Newton’s cousins joining that day – called Company F – all were the sons of siblings of his mother: brothers Conrad Billmyer (1797–1847); John Joseph Billmyer (1802–1845), sisters Judith Billmyer Koontz (1795-1856); Susan Billmyer McQuilkin (1798-1873); and Esther Mary Billmyer Lemen (1800-1887). Other cousins followed, joining both North and South. (See “References”)

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So many from the family were in Company F, it at times seemed their own. The first cousins to enlist were (with service record summaries):
– Snyder, Vivian P. (1999). Twenty First Cousins in the Civil War. Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society. Vol. LXV. pp. 47-51; Driver, Robert J. (1991). “1st Virginia Cavalry.” Lynchburg, Va.: H. E. Howard, Inc. Print. – More. . .

1. BILLMYER, JAMES M.: b. Va. 12/4/1836. 5’11’, fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes. Merchant, Shepherdstown PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 Co. F as 1st Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Horse killed Bull Run 7/21/61. Present through 1/6/62. To 2nd Lt. Present through 5/1/62. Not re-elected. Re-enl. Pvt. Fredericksburg 8/1/63. Present through 8/64. Acting Adjutant of Regt. 2/12/65. Paroled Winchester 4/27/65. d. 2/20/1913. bur. Berkeley County. – Service Record; Snyder. 1860 Census.

2. BILLMYER, JOHN T.: b. Va. 1/11/32. 5’8′, fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes. 1st Lt., Co. F. Deputy Sheriff, Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present until detached with baggage trains 3/4/62. Present through 10/20/62. Elected 2nd Lt. To 1st Lt. Present until WIA Five Forks 4/1/65. Paroled Mt. Jackson 4/18/65. d. 3/26/74. bur. Elmwood Cem. Shepherdstown. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.

3. BILLMYER, MILTON J.: b. Va. 10/10/34. Farmer, Jefferson Co. 6′, fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes. Captain, Co. F. 1st Virginia Cav., Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Pvt. Present through 7/1/61, appointed 1st Lt. Present through 10/12/62. elected Captain. Present until WIA (left thigh) Haw’s Shop 5/28/64. Absent wounded in Richmond hospital until furloughed for 30 days 7/14/64. Present Appomattox. Paroled Winchester 4/27/65. d. near Shepherdstown, W.Va. 8/31/07. bur. Elmwood Cem. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.

4. LEMEN, JOHN JAMES ALEXANDER: b. Va. 11/19/39. 5’7″. fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes. Farmhand, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown Co. F. 4/18/61 as Pvt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present until captured 7/61. Exch. Present 9/62. Captured Smithfield 5/31/63. Sent to Ft. Monroe. Exch. 6/5/63. Present until absent sick in Richmond hospital 8/24/64. Released 6/30/64. d. 1/10/71. bur. Elmwood Cem. Shepherdstown, W.Va. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

5. LEMEN, THOMAS THORNTON.: b. Va. 8/15/42. Student, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Co. F Shepherdstown 4/18/61 1st Virginia Cav. Pvt. Present until WIA Aldie 6/17/63. POW Middleburg d. 6/20/63. bur. Elmwood Cem., Shepherdstown. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

6. LEMEN, WILLIAM THORNBURG: b. Va. 6/15/35. 5’10”. fair complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Farmer, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Co. F 1st Virginia Cav. Shepherdstown 4/18/61. Present through 8/61, promoted 3rd Sgt. Present through 8/62, promoted 2nd Sgt. Promoted 1st Sgt 10/20/62. Present 10/63. Present through 8/64. Paroled Winchester 4/18/65. d. near Hedgesville, W.Va. 4/17/99. bur. Elmwood Cem., Shepherdstown, W.Va. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

7. LEMEN, WILLOUGHBY: b. Va. 11/20/44. 5’10”. enlisted 4/18/61 Co. F, 1st Virginia Cav. under William A. Morgan. Present thru to 10/20/1862. Promoted to 1st Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present thru 11/1863. Service records show name change from “William T. Lemen” to Willoughby N. Lemen 11-12-63. Captured 4/65. 12/28/64 promoted to Junior 2nd Lieut. Paroled 4/18/65. d. 7/19/1913. buried Elmwood Cem. – Tombstone Inscriptions, p. 170; Kenamond, p. 74; Service Record (pp. 15-28, start @ p. 15); Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

8.MCQUILKIN, WILLIAM H.: b. Va. 1841. Laborer Charles Town enl. Co. F. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Pvt. 1st Virginia Cav. Fell ill with pneumonia and was granted sick furlough August 31st, 1861; sent to hospital December 26th, and died January 6th, 1862 at Manassas. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.; 1860 Census.

9. KOONTZ, THORNTON: b. Va. 12/16/21. enl. 4/18/61 Co. F, 1st Va. Cav. Sgt. Present through 4/62. Reassigned under Milton J. Billmyer. Pvt. substitute for Robert K. Wilson. POW paroled 4/18/65. d. 5/12/86. bur. Elmwood Cem. – Tombstone Inscriptions, p. 168. Service Record; Snyder, p. 47. 1860 Census.

APRIL 19, 1861 – Martinsburg: Two more cousins of Newton’s enlist in Company B of the 1st Virginia Cavalry:

10.NOLL, WILLIAM T.: Va. b. 10/2/32. enlisted Co. B, 1st Virginia Cav. Martinsburg 4/19/61, promoted to 2nd lieutenant. Present until 5-6/62 sick. Bay mare killed 8/21/64 Berryville, Va. Present 7/62-4/65. Paroled 4/18/65 Winchester. d. 2/27/03. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 47. 1860 Census.

11. LEMEN, WILLIAM MARTIN: b. Va. 12/6/31. enlisted Co. B, 1st Virginia Cav. Martinsburg 4/19/61. On daily duty attending to the sick. Present until 2/11/62 on furlough. On detached service with regimental medical dept. Paroled 4/26/65 Winchester. d. 5/2/03. Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

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OTHER COUSINS ENLIST LATER:

BILLMYER, ROBERT LEMEN (1843-1910) – Another son of Newton’s uncle, Conrad Billmyer (1797–1847), enlisted June 28, 1861 at Shepherdstown:

12.BILLMYER, ROBERT LEMEN: b. Va. 9/25/43, Student, 5’6″. fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes. Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 6/28/63. Pvt., Co. F. 1st Virginia Cav. Present through 12/63. Absent on detached service 1/25-2/28/64. Present through 8/64. WIA (head) Winebrenner’s Cross Roads near Shepherdstown 9/64. Present Appomattox 4/9/65 and carried flag of truce to the enemy. Paroled Winchester 4/18/65. He lived in the county after the war. d. near Shepherdstown, W.Va. 3/19/10. bur. Elmwood Cem. Service Record; 1860 Census.

Newton’s other uncle, John Joseph Billmyer (1802–1845)’s wife, Eliza Williamson Lemen Billmyer (1806-1886), had two brothers and a sister who provided four more (2 Joneses, 2 Williamsons) enlistees into the 1st Virginia Cavalry and a second brother of Eliza’s provided three soldiers for the Union. – Snyder, pp. 48-51.

Eliza Billmyer’s sister – Mary O. Lemen (1811-1909) married Adrian Wynkoop Jones (1805-1877).- Snyder, p. 49. Their sons who enlisted were:

13. JONES, JOHN REYNOLDS: b. 1844. enl. 8/20/64 Shepherdstown Co. F. 1st Va Cav. under M. J. Billmyer. POW. Paroled 4/21/65 Winchester. d. 1887. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

14. JONES, THOMAS J. or F.: b. 1839 record only confirms being in Co. F. of 1st Va Cavalry. d. 1923. fold3.com 6 September 2011 Web. 1 December 2015. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

Eliza Billmyer’s brother, Jacob, married; they had two sons; Jacob died and his widow raised the two sons with an uncle of Eliza Billmyer’s named Williamson, who adopted the boys. – Snyder, pp. 49-50. The young men enlisted as:

15. WILLIAMSON, MATTHEW WHITE: b. 1845. enl. 8/13/1861 at New Market, Va. with Captain Morgan, Co. F 1st Va. Cavalry. Present sent on detached service 1/20/1864. Present 7-8/64. Paroled 5/9/1865. Winchester. d. 1930. Service Record; 1860 Census.

16. WILLIAMSON, THOMAS LEMEN: b. 1847. Only record is being a prisoner of war, being in Co. F of the 1st Va. Cavalry and having been paroled 4/9/1865 at New Market, Va. Description: height 5’9”, hair: light, eyes: blue. d. 1875. Service Record; 1860 Census.

Eliza Billmyer’s second brother, Robert Lemen (1813-1898) and his wife, Sarah Elizabeth Light (1816-1883), had three sons who went with the Federal Army’s First Maryland Cavalry: In Co. I, Peter (1840-1921); In Co. H, Jacob F. (1842-1922), and Thomas J. (1843-1908). – Snyder, pp. 50-51. The boys enlisted as:

17. LEMEN, PETER L.: b. 1840. 5’9.5” dark complexion, blue eyes, light hair. enl. 9/3/61 Camp Lamon, Williamsport, Md. for three years. Pvt. Capt. Russell’s Co. 1st Va. Cav.(later Co. I. First Md Cav.). 12/30/61 on detached service Williamsport, Md. 5-6/62 detailed at the Ferry at Williamsport on Potomac. 3/9/64 on detached service, clerk in the Provost Marshall’s office Baltimore City, Md. by order of Brig. Gen. Lockwood S.O. No. 61, Par 9. 9/3/64 mustered out, term of service expired. d. 1921. Service Record; 1860 Census.

18. LEMEN, JACOB F.: b. 1842 enl. 9/6/61, mustered in 12/31/61 Williamsport, Md. Pvt. Capt. Zeller’s Co. 1st Reg’t Va. Volunteers (later Co. H. First Md Cav.). Present 1/61-4/63. POW 5-8/63. Present 9/63-12/64. Discharged 12/3/64 term of service expired. d. 1922. Service Record; 1860 Census.

19. LEMEN, THOMAS J.: b. 1843. enl. 9/3/61 Camp Lamon Pvt. Capt. Russell’s Co. 1st Va. Cav.(later Co. I. First Md Cav.) for three years. Present 3-4/62-8/63. Promoted to corporal. 3/26/64 Reduced to Pvt. Present 4/64. 9/3/64 mustered out, term of service expired. d. 1908. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

William Morgan’s son, Augustine, with Mrs. Anna Morgan Getzendanner, recounted that fateful “join-up” day of April 18th, as his father left home:

Wm_A_Morgan_D
For some time, the ominous cloud of war hung over us, only to burst at length with all its stern reality. Though but six years of age, I can clearly recall the great anxiety and gloom that predominated. Owing to my extreme youth, I could not comprehend the fact that we were upon the verge of a great conflict. My parents solemnly conversed in low tones and all about the house seemed confusion for what my father informed me was the getting ready for his departure from home, and with his Company, of which he was Captain, to enter the Confederate Army. He said that there would be a great war and that his services were needed and that he must not shirk his duty. He also told me that I would be the only man left to protect my mother and little sisters. I inquired the meaning of war and Father made me understand – that war was fighting, killing, one army against another, cruel and barbarous but often a necessary evil and unavoidable. In good faith I was ready to accede to my father’s demands and my bosom swelled proudly at the confidence he imposed in me.

The eventful day arrived when my Father mounted upon George, a beautiful grey horse, at the head of his company, left for the war. We stood at the gate, my mother, little sisters and I, also Mammy Liza and Uncle Ned, servants of our home. We waved farewell and Mother wept though she little realized that war would endure for months and years. The parting from Father was painful and the responsibilities of protection of the house and family seemed in my childish idea, a heavy one. Father was a splendid equestrian and sat his horse with ease. Tall and slender, blue of eye, his hair dark as the raven’s wing, my father seemed to me a perfect type of what a soldier should be. – Getzendanner, Anna Morgan and Morgan Augustine C. “A Boy’s Recollections of the Civil War – 1861-1865.” Shepherdstown, WV: Self-published. pp. 1-2.

Morgan’s younger brother, Daniel (1835-1865) who was living on Shepherdstown’s German Street with their widowed mother, enlisted in Co. F the same day as William. Their brother, “Jack” Smith Morgan (1838-?) enlisted in Company F on May 11, 1861. Both in 1862 would seek places in other companies in the 1st Virginia as their brother became the commander of Company F. – Driver, p. 210.

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SATURDAY, JUNE 15, 1861 – CHARLES TOWN: NEWTON BAKER BREAKS WITH HIS PARENTS AND JOINS MORGAN’S AND HIS COUSINS’ CONFEDERATE COMPANY:

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Spending his days clerking in his father’s store that would in a year become the official Federal post office at that northeast corner of Church and German Streets in Shepherdstown, and daily with his mother and his prosperous, pro-Union uncle, David Billmyer – the stark choice weighed heavily upon nineteen-year-old Newton. Five more of his cousins would enlist later in Morgan’s Company F; while, still, three other kin of Newton’s would enlist in the Federal 1st Maryland Cavalry Regiment. – Snyder, pp. 49-51;

On the warm, clear Friday of June 15th, when the encamped Confederate soldiers and cavalry at Harpers Ferry rose to reveille at 4 AM and began leaving, most for Charlestown – up the road, Newton rode a fine bay mare from home toward Charlestown, joining, late that day, Morgan and his cousins at a campsite on the Bullskin Run a few miles south of Charlestown. Newton Baker became Private Baker of Co. F with a lot to learn. – Vairin; Service Record N. D. Baker.

Father Elias was a northern sympathizer and was not pleased to have his son Newton Diehl serving the Confederacy. Father Elias spoke to his son only once during the war. Records suggest that when his son was held prisoner at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, that that was the most likely moment Elias Baker went to bring his exchanged son out of prison. – Kenamond, pp. 21-22; Service Records.

In fact, by 1862 with the townspeople’s sympathies also splitting into two camps, Elias Baker, who would be appointed by President Lincoln to be Shepherdstown’s postmaster, a post he would hold until well after the war, diplomatically split mail delivery duties with his Confederate counterpart and fellow townsmen, Daniel Rentch.

Father Elias Baker’s postmaster job, starting in 1862, almost required him to shun his son.

A biographer of Newton’s son, wrote of the relationship between Elias and Newton when peacetime came:
Elias Baker was devoted to the Union, received an appointment from President Lincoln as postmaster at Shepherdstown, and retained the Federal office throughout the War. Son Newton Baker, as a member of the Cavalry commanded by Jeb Stuart, fought at Gettysburg, was captured, and exchanged to fight again at Richmond. . . but had a tolerant attitude that was one of his strongest qualities. He felt that the War ended with Lee’s surrender and he was willing to accept the Northern victory. Cramer pp. 13-15.

BAKER, NEWTON DIEHL: b. Washington County, Md. 10/3/41. 5’6″ fair complexion, brown hair, blue eyes. attended Wittenberg College one year. clerk Shepherdstown post office, Jefferson County. enlisted in the 1st Virginia Cavalry Charles Town 6/15/61 as Pvt. in Co. F. Present until detached to Gainesville 12/10/61. Captured Smithfield 5/31/63. Sent to Ft. McHenry. Exch. 6/63. Promoted 2nd Corp. Present until detailed as ordinance sgt of regt 11/15/63. Horse killed 8/19/64. Wounded in thigh Fishers Hill 9/22/64. Paroled Winchester 4/23/65. medical school 1868. surgeon for the B&O railroad. d. Martinsburg 1909. – Driver, Robert J. (1991). “1st Virginia Cavalry.” Lynchburg, Va.: H. E. Howard, Inc. Print.

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HOW COMING WAR DIVIDES, THEN DESTROYS FRIENDSHIPS AND MINDS:

By the month of June the circle of more robust characters that still retained their political sanity was small and diminishing daily. They did not drop off now after long and lingering arguments, painful doubts, rallyings, and relapses as formerly; but a normal mind would fall suddenly into incoherence and frenzy. Principles based upon the education and habits of a lifetime, sustained by the clearest views of interest, the pride of consistency, and every sentiment of honor, would perish in a night, like the gourd of Jonah. This change was easily discernible in the countenance and demeanor of its victims. Yesterday your friend looked in your face with a clear and earnest eye, and discussed questions calmly and logically. To-day he shunned you, his eye was restless and unsteady, his manner painfully excited, his talk full of incoherencies; in a short time you would perceive there was a total absorption of all his previous opinions, idiosyncrasies, social sympathies, and antipathies, moral and intellectual characteristics, in the prevailing frenzy. These phenomena, which at first excited indignation, grief, and amazement, in the course of time ceased to surprise, and became subjects of merriment. Among ourselves we speculated jocosely as to who would go under next; and in the privacy of our own souls entertained the question, whether it was the world around us or ourselves that was mad. It is useful, perhaps, but not the less humiliating to human pride, to test the depth and power of individual principle and will, to ascertain precisely for how many days and hours ones best-founded opinions and most positive convictions will maintain themselves unsupported against the current of society and the menaces of power. From the observations of these few months I have become convinced that no amount of clear conviction, rectitude of purpose, or moral heroism can long maintain a passive defense against the assaults of an active and fiery enthusiasm. Organization must meet organization; passion blaze out against passion; the audacious and unscrupulous spirit of revolution must be counteracted by a spirit as bold and remorseless as itself. The idea is expressed with more point and brevity in the popular epigram, “One must fight the Devil with fire.” The National Government had thus far lost every thing by its temporizing and conciliatory policy. –
Strother, David H. (July, 1866). “Personal Recollections of the Civil War.” Harpers Magazine. Cornell Digital Library – The Making of America. 19 July 2011. Web. 29 January 2014.

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1. NEWTON BAKER’S “MOST” DIVIDED CLAN (Pt. 1 of 4) (above) by Jim Surkamp
2. NEWTON BAKER “SEES THE ELEPHANT” MANASSAS, VA (Pt. 2 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-d-baker-sees-the-elep…
3. NEWTON BAKER’S LIFE IN THE FAMED FIRST VIRGINIA CAVALRY 1861-1865 (Pt. 3 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-bakers-life-in-the-fa…
4. NEWTON BAKER”S REMARKABLE SON (Pt. 4 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-bakers-remarkable-son…

For References and Image Credits:
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-d-bakers-most-divided…

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Job Training In College
Image by Jim Surkamp

Civil War Scholars: The Powerful Experience of the War-Torn, Northern Shenandoah Valley

Newton D. Baker’s “Most” Divided Clan (Pt. 1 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
By Jim Surkamp on February 2, 2016 in Jefferson County

NEWTON D. BAKER’S “MOST” DIVIDED CLAN (Pt. 1 of 4) by Jim Surkamp

Cousins of Co_F_FINAL

SUMMARY:
Each generation rebels against the former. The Bakers of Maryland, Shepherdstown and finally Martinsburg – muddled thru traditional inter-generational discords like a schooner pitching through high seas. Elias Baker one-upped a father who deserted his children by being a good father. His son, antsy nineteen-year-old Newton D. Baker rebelled against his doting father, a soon-to-be appointed federal postmaster in Shepherdstown, by riding off and enlisting in Company F of the First Virginia Cavalry – Confederate – following the recent example of a figurative avalanche of nine of his blood cousins into that same company. Still more cousins would enlist.

Life in a wartime saddle matured him for four years: battles, imprisonment, routine heroics, his wounding, having a fine bay mare shot from under him, (and later, a suspiciously extravagant compensation package for this lost horse offered by a cousin with clout), and, finally, coming home. Bearing witness to so many in need of medical care begat Newton’s post-war calling as a doctor. He finished training, was mentored by Shepherdstown neighbor and physician, John Quigley, who transferred his practice to the young up-and-comer.

But burgeoning ambition called away the next son of a Baker – Newton D. Baker Jr. Reading voraciously and eschewing the stethoscope and his father’s beckoning practice, off Junior went to Cleveland – joking that he was being a carpetbagger invading the Northern states – ascending a skyward ladder to heights of acclaim unprecedented for the Bakers. He was the progressive mayor of Cleveland; then, after more promotions, President Woodrow Wilson approached his fellow Virginian and appointed Newton D. Baker, Jr. to be our Secretary of War, managing the best he could the American role in the calamitous First World War. Today we have the Newton D. Baker Veterans’ Hospital in Martinsburg to his fond memory.

THE BAKERS’ REGENERATION:

The Bakers once of Shepherdstown were busy each generation rebelling in full measure from the former. Each time, the new generation would reckon a new guiding star deemed a wiser calling than their parents.

The Baker generations progressed from a single outcast, who led one Baker generation, then to another family member, three cycles later, who was even considered in 1932 a potential candidate for the Presidency.

GENERATION 1: THE UNFORGIVEN ELIAS BAKER, SR. (1785-1863) IN BAKERESVILLE, WASHINGTON COUNTY, MD.:

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Called by one family biographer, C. H. Cramer, “a soft spot in the family tree,” he wrote: “(They) could take no pride in this Elias Baker, an Englishman, who settled about 1760 in Maryland near the later site of the battle of Antietam. There Elias married, started a family (ten boys and five girls), and then deserted it.” – Cramer, p. 15.

GENERATION 2: ELIAS BAKER, JR. (1811-1867) – FAMILY MAN, SADDLER AND POSTMASTER:

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Starting anew, Elias Baker, Jr. left Bakersville, Maryland, the family’s ancestral lands, and crossed the Potomac to Berkeley County, Va. He found his lifemate, Mary Ann Billmyer (1816-1896) living at the Millbrook farm, one of thirteen children to her prosperous parents, Martin and Susan Billmyer. She and her siblings were struggling with their farms after the death in the mid-1830s of both their parents.

She and Elias married November, 1840 and first lived in Appomatox County, Elias making and fixing saddles. The next decade brought the deaths of three of Mary Ann’s older brothers and a sister, while their own young family grew by two sons and a daughter. The first-born in 1841 had brown hair and blue eyes and he was named Newton Diehl Baker, who this story is about.

The Bakers moved in March, 1850 to Van Clevesville and closer to her large family. Susan Baker’s parents and older brothers had grown wheat and had a booming business at their own mill across the road from their home. This much-in-demand ground wheat would be carried across the toll bridge that Mary Ann’s brother, David, largely owned at Shepherdstown and was shipped by canal boats to Georgetown and overseas buyers.

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In March, 1857, they came to Shepherdstown and Mary Ann Baker used family inheritance to buy out brother David’s boat store at the northeast corner of Church and German Street.

In March, 1858, she also bought – seven, quick-succession doors to the west on German Street – what would become the Baker residence well into the 20th century – room enough for their family of eight children: Newton, Ann Katherine, Cora Louise, Martin Billmyer, Solomon Elmer, William Elias Fink, Alban Howard, and Henry Seaton. – A. D. Kenamond, “Prominent Men of Shepherdstown 1762-1962.” p. 21.

WAR CLOUDS AND GENERATION GAPS:

The John Brown raid and trial in October, 1859 and the subsequent hangings of seven of the raiders up to March, 1860 set the stage for the presidential election that coming fall. According to Andrew Hunter, the prosecutor in the John Brown trial, the fright that came to locals with the John Brown raid was that it was, to them really, the overture to what they plainly called The War Against Slavery. – Andrew Hunter. Sept 5, 1887 New Orleans Times Democrat.

Lincoln’s election in November, 1860 and the Deep South states’ seceding despite Lincoln’s warnings – brought the nation and Jefferson Countians to the edge of the precipice.

In Shepherdstown, the older generation, born around 1800 – such as Dr. John and Mary Quigley, Elias and Susan Baker, and even Robert E. Lee’s first cousin, Edmund Jennings Lee – strongly voiced their opposition to any such plan for Virginia to secede from the Union.

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The daughter of Edmund J. Lee, teen-aged Henrietta Edmonia or “Netta,” wrote later of a run-in in early 1861 between her father and brother Edmund:
I remember very vividly a gathering when Uncle Charles Lee was present. He was my father’s younger brother and a lawyer by profession. He came from Washington to consult Father regarding his resignation of the position he was holding in one of the departments of the United States government.

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My brother, Edmund, Jr. and a boy of about fifteen years, who was standing by during the conversation, said: “Why Uncle Charles, could you not get the same position in the Confederate States government?” Father turned quickly, saying: “You young rascal,” strongly emphasizing the broad “a” as was his habit, “let me hear you talk about any Confederate States and I will skin you!” – Diary of Nettie Lee, pp. 4-5.

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When war became unavoidable, David Hunter Strother of Martinsburg, who was a Unionist from another divided family and later an officer in the Federal army, was observing the moods of Jefferson County’s people. The younger were excited but: “I thought I could discern in the eyes of some of the older and wiser (African-Americans) a gleam of anxious speculation – a silent and tremulous questioning of the future. . . There were also some among the white citizens who stood aloof in silence and sadness, protesting against the proceeding by an occasional bitter sigh or significant sneer, but nothing more.

But the thirst for adventure was almost unquenchable among the young, having been prepared for adventure their entire lives.

Wrote one of these young local cavalrymen in later years:
Young men of the present day, who flourish in fine buggies, smoke cigars and cigarettes, part their hair in the middle, and occasionally greet “inspiring bold John Barley Corn,” can ill appreciate the pastimes and pleasures of the youth of a generation ago, when the horse, the gun, and the dog were the ne plus ultra of masculine aspirations. Those good old days of innocent sports and recreations, are still valued as the brightest and happiest in life. Alas! of our little group, that often chased the squirrel from tree-to-tree and made the forests ring with volleys of musketry, or startled the partridge from its repose in the fields, but two are left to tell the tale. That acquaintance with the horse, which began in early childhood, soon ripened into affection, and the horse and rider were one in life and action. – Baylor, p. 15.
NOTE “inspiring, bold John Barley Corn” is taken from Robert Burns’ poem “Tam O-Shanter.” POEM’S FULL TEXT UNDER “REFERENCES.”

Wrote another local man who joined the Federal cause:

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Horses and firearms are their playthings from childhood. Impatient of the restraints of school houses and work shops they seek life and pleasure in the soil, and thus early learn the topography of nature, the ways of the fields and forests, swamps, and mountains. Their social and political life, but little restrained by law or its usage, develops a vigorous individuality. For the most part, ignorant of the luxuries and refinements of cities, they prefer bacon and Scotch whisky to venison and champagne. Tall, athletic, rough, and full of fire and vitality, the half-horse, half-alligator type still predominates . . .
Strother, p. 6.

Young men, who from the moment their feet could reach the stirrups were attuned for adventure and to the dismay of their sober parents, quickly responded to the call to arms when President Lincoln put out a call for 75,000 volunteers to bring all the seceding states back. By mid-April, 1861, young men in Virginia had to choose to be one of those volunteers or rebel. While about 128 African Americans from the County would join the United States Colored Troops, some Unionist County boys who were white left the area to escape the threats of imprisonment and more from the area firebrand, Turner Ashby. But most of the young men rebelled.

Wrote one who witnessed events in Charlestown, Va.:
Alas! poor boy, what sense of duty or prudent counsels could hold him in the whirl of this moral maelstrom? What did he care for the vague terror of an indictment for treason, or the misty doctrine of Federal supremacy? What did he know of nationality beyond the circle of friends and kindred? What was his sneaking, apologetic, unsympathetic life worth after all?

But according to my judgment the greater number of these young volunteers were moved neither by social pressure nor political prejudice. The all-pervading love of adventure and fighting instincts were the most successful recruiting officers of the occasion. For they had heard of battles, and had longed to follow to the field some warlike lord – so at the first roll of the drum they rushed cheerily from school house and office, counter and work shop, field and fireside, earnest, eager, reckless fellows, marching with a free and vigorous step, sitting their horses like wild Pawnees, most admirable material for a rebellion, just as good soldiers for the Government if perchance the rub-a-dub of the Union drums had first aroused their martial ardor. – Strother, Excerpted from “Personal Recollections of the War,” from “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine,” July, 1866, Vol. XXXIV, p. 141.

WHAT THE YOUNG LADIES THOUGHT WAS DECISIVE:

While there were still a few men found who stubbornly struggled against the sweeping current, the women of all ages and conditions threw themselves into it without hesitation or reserve. His schoolmates and companions who had already donned ‘the gray’ scarce concealed their scorn. His sisters, rallied, reproached, and pouted, blushing to acknowledge his ignominy. His Jeannette, lately so tender and loving, now refused his hand in the dance, and, passing him with nose in air, bestowed her smiles and her bouquet upon some gallant rival with belt and buttons. Day-after-day he saw the baskets loaded with choice viands, roasted fowls, pickles, cakes, and potted sweetmeats, but not for him. Wherever he went there was a braiding of caps and coats, a gathering of flowers and weaving of wreaths, but none for him – no scented and embroidered handkerchiefs waved from carriage-windows as he rode by. The genial flood of social sympathy upon which he had hitherto floated so blandly had left him stranded on the icy shore. Then come the cheering regiments with their drums and banners, the snorting squadrons of glossy prancing steeds the jingling of knightly spurs, the stirring blast of the trumpets. There they went – companionship, love, life, glory, all sweeping by to Harper’s Ferry! – Strother, Excerpted from “Personal Recollections of the War,” from “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine,” July, 1866, Vol. XXXIV, p. 141.

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Sewing societies were organized, and delicate hands which had never before engaged in ruder labor than the hemming of a ruffle now bled in the strife with gray jeans and tent cloth. Haversacks, knapsacks, caps, jackets, and tents were manufactured by hundreds and dozens.

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The gift most in vogue from a young lady to her favored knight was a headdress imitated from those worn by the British troops in India and called a Havelock, (that Gen. Jackson later forebade because it made his men easier targets.-ED). Laden with musket, sabre, pistol, and bowie-knife, no youth considered his armament complete unless he had one of these silly clouts stretched over his hat.

Woe to the youth who did not need a Havelock; who, owing to natural indisposition or the prudent counsel of a father or a friend, hesitated to join the army of the South. The curse of Clan Alpin on those who should prove recreant to the sign of the fiery cross was mere dramatic noise compared with the curse that blighted his soul. – Ibid. p. 141.

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Many of these young men, including several men from the Moler clan were in the line that first, fateful day on April 18, 1861, when the local militia assembled to seize the federal armory, with the inked signatures still damp in Richmond on the voted document by Virginia to secede. The armory burned before they seized it, but hard drilling began just days later at Bolivar Heights, under the unknown, erstwhile professor at Virginia Military Institute, Col. Thomas Jonathan Jackson.

THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1861 – SHEPHERDSTOWN, VA – PRESSURE MOUNTS ON NEWTON BAKER TO ENLIST IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY:

That day, nine of Newton’s cousins rode away from their farm steads in Berkeley and Jefferson County to join Company F of the newly-formed Shepherdstown Troop of 1st Virginia Cavalry, commanded by 6’2” slender, dark-haired, full-bearded 37-year-old William Augustine Morgan, who lived with his family at their home, Falling Springs, just south of Shepherdstown.

Newton’s cousins joining that day – called Company F – all were the sons of siblings of his mother: brothers Conrad Billmyer (1797–1847); John Joseph Billmyer (1802–1845), sisters Judith Billmyer Koontz (1795-1856); Susan Billmyer McQuilkin (1798-1873); and Esther Mary Billmyer Lemen (1800-1887). Other cousins followed, joining both North and South. (See “References”)

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So many from the family were in Company F, it at times seemed their own. The first cousins to enlist were (with service record summaries):
– Snyder, Vivian P. (1999). Twenty First Cousins in the Civil War. Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society. Vol. LXV. pp. 47-51; Driver, Robert J. (1991). “1st Virginia Cavalry.” Lynchburg, Va.: H. E. Howard, Inc. Print. – More. . .

1. BILLMYER, JAMES M.: b. Va. 12/4/1836. 5’11’, fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes. Merchant, Shepherdstown PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 Co. F as 1st Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Horse killed Bull Run 7/21/61. Present through 1/6/62. To 2nd Lt. Present through 5/1/62. Not re-elected. Re-enl. Pvt. Fredericksburg 8/1/63. Present through 8/64. Acting Adjutant of Regt. 2/12/65. Paroled Winchester 4/27/65. d. 2/20/1913. bur. Berkeley County. – Service Record; Snyder. 1860 Census.

2. BILLMYER, JOHN T.: b. Va. 1/11/32. 5’8′, fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes. 1st Lt., Co. F. Deputy Sheriff, Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present until detached with baggage trains 3/4/62. Present through 10/20/62. Elected 2nd Lt. To 1st Lt. Present until WIA Five Forks 4/1/65. Paroled Mt. Jackson 4/18/65. d. 3/26/74. bur. Elmwood Cem. Shepherdstown. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.

3. BILLMYER, MILTON J.: b. Va. 10/10/34. Farmer, Jefferson Co. 6′, fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes. Captain, Co. F. 1st Virginia Cav., Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Pvt. Present through 7/1/61, appointed 1st Lt. Present through 10/12/62. elected Captain. Present until WIA (left thigh) Haw’s Shop 5/28/64. Absent wounded in Richmond hospital until furloughed for 30 days 7/14/64. Present Appomattox. Paroled Winchester 4/27/65. d. near Shepherdstown, W.Va. 8/31/07. bur. Elmwood Cem. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.

4. LEMEN, JOHN JAMES ALEXANDER: b. Va. 11/19/39. 5’7″. fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes. Farmhand, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown Co. F. 4/18/61 as Pvt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present until captured 7/61. Exch. Present 9/62. Captured Smithfield 5/31/63. Sent to Ft. Monroe. Exch. 6/5/63. Present until absent sick in Richmond hospital 8/24/64. Released 6/30/64. d. 1/10/71. bur. Elmwood Cem. Shepherdstown, W.Va. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

5. LEMEN, THOMAS THORNTON.: b. Va. 8/15/42. Student, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Co. F Shepherdstown 4/18/61 1st Virginia Cav. Pvt. Present until WIA Aldie 6/17/63. POW Middleburg d. 6/20/63. bur. Elmwood Cem., Shepherdstown. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

6. LEMEN, WILLIAM THORNBURG: b. Va. 6/15/35. 5’10”. fair complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Farmer, Charles Town PO, Jefferson Co. 1860 census. enl. Co. F 1st Virginia Cav. Shepherdstown 4/18/61. Present through 8/61, promoted 3rd Sgt. Present through 8/62, promoted 2nd Sgt. Promoted 1st Sgt 10/20/62. Present 10/63. Present through 8/64. Paroled Winchester 4/18/65. d. near Hedgesville, W.Va. 4/17/99. bur. Elmwood Cem., Shepherdstown, W.Va. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

7. LEMEN, WILLOUGHBY: b. Va. 11/20/44. 5’10”. enlisted 4/18/61 Co. F, 1st Virginia Cav. under William A. Morgan. Present thru to 10/20/1862. Promoted to 1st Sgt. 1st Virginia Cav. Present thru 11/1863. Service records show name change from “William T. Lemen” to Willoughby N. Lemen 11-12-63. Captured 4/65. 12/28/64 promoted to Junior 2nd Lieut. Paroled 4/18/65. d. 7/19/1913. buried Elmwood Cem. – Tombstone Inscriptions, p. 170; Kenamond, p. 74; Service Record (pp. 15-28, start @ p. 15); Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

8.MCQUILKIN, WILLIAM H.: b. Va. 1841. Laborer Charles Town enl. Co. F. Shepherdstown 4/18/61 as Pvt. 1st Virginia Cav. Fell ill with pneumonia and was granted sick furlough August 31st, 1861; sent to hospital December 26th, and died January 6th, 1862 at Manassas. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 48.; 1860 Census.

9. KOONTZ, THORNTON: b. Va. 12/16/21. enl. 4/18/61 Co. F, 1st Va. Cav. Sgt. Present through 4/62. Reassigned under Milton J. Billmyer. Pvt. substitute for Robert K. Wilson. POW paroled 4/18/65. d. 5/12/86. bur. Elmwood Cem. – Tombstone Inscriptions, p. 168. Service Record; Snyder, p. 47. 1860 Census.

APRIL 19, 1861 – Martinsburg: Two more cousins of Newton’s enlist in Company B of the 1st Virginia Cavalry:

10.NOLL, WILLIAM T.: Va. b. 10/2/32. enlisted Co. B, 1st Virginia Cav. Martinsburg 4/19/61, promoted to 2nd lieutenant. Present until 5-6/62 sick. Bay mare killed 8/21/64 Berryville, Va. Present 7/62-4/65. Paroled 4/18/65 Winchester. d. 2/27/03. – Service Record; Snyder, p. 47. 1860 Census.

11. LEMEN, WILLIAM MARTIN: b. Va. 12/6/31. enlisted Co. B, 1st Virginia Cav. Martinsburg 4/19/61. On daily duty attending to the sick. Present until 2/11/62 on furlough. On detached service with regimental medical dept. Paroled 4/26/65 Winchester. d. 5/2/03. Service Record; Snyder, p. 48. 1860 Census.

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OTHER COUSINS ENLIST LATER:

BILLMYER, ROBERT LEMEN (1843-1910) – Another son of Newton’s uncle, Conrad Billmyer (1797–1847), enlisted June 28, 1861 at Shepherdstown:

12.BILLMYER, ROBERT LEMEN: b. Va. 9/25/43, Student, 5’6″. fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes. Vanclevesville PO, Berkeley Co. 1860 census. enl. Shepherdstown 6/28/63. Pvt., Co. F. 1st Virginia Cav. Present through 12/63. Absent on detached service 1/25-2/28/64. Present through 8/64. WIA (head) Winebrenner’s Cross Roads near Shepherdstown 9/64. Present Appomattox 4/9/65 and carried flag of truce to the enemy. Paroled Winchester 4/18/65. He lived in the county after the war. d. near Shepherdstown, W.Va. 3/19/10. bur. Elmwood Cem. Service Record; 1860 Census.

Newton’s other uncle, John Joseph Billmyer (1802–1845)’s wife, Eliza Williamson Lemen Billmyer (1806-1886), had two brothers and a sister who provided four more (2 Joneses, 2 Williamsons) enlistees into the 1st Virginia Cavalry and a second brother of Eliza’s provided three soldiers for the Union. – Snyder, pp. 48-51.

Eliza Billmyer’s sister – Mary O. Lemen (1811-1909) married Adrian Wynkoop Jones (1805-1877).- Snyder, p. 49. Their sons who enlisted were:

13. JONES, JOHN REYNOLDS: b. 1844. enl. 8/20/64 Shepherdstown Co. F. 1st Va Cav. under M. J. Billmyer. POW. Paroled 4/21/65 Winchester. d. 1887. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

14. JONES, THOMAS J. or F.: b. 1839 record only confirms being in Co. F. of 1st Va Cavalry. d. 1923. fold3.com 6 September 2011 Web. 1 December 2015. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

Eliza Billmyer’s brother, Jacob, married; they had two sons; Jacob died and his widow raised the two sons with an uncle of Eliza Billmyer’s named Williamson, who adopted the boys. – Snyder, pp. 49-50. The young men enlisted as:

15. WILLIAMSON, MATTHEW WHITE: b. 1845. enl. 8/13/1861 at New Market, Va. with Captain Morgan, Co. F 1st Va. Cavalry. Present sent on detached service 1/20/1864. Present 7-8/64. Paroled 5/9/1865. Winchester. d. 1930. Service Record; 1860 Census.

16. WILLIAMSON, THOMAS LEMEN: b. 1847. Only record is being a prisoner of war, being in Co. F of the 1st Va. Cavalry and having been paroled 4/9/1865 at New Market, Va. Description: height 5’9”, hair: light, eyes: blue. d. 1875. Service Record; 1860 Census.

Eliza Billmyer’s second brother, Robert Lemen (1813-1898) and his wife, Sarah Elizabeth Light (1816-1883), had three sons who went with the Federal Army’s First Maryland Cavalry: In Co. I, Peter (1840-1921); In Co. H, Jacob F. (1842-1922), and Thomas J. (1843-1908). – Snyder, pp. 50-51. The boys enlisted as:

17. LEMEN, PETER L.: b. 1840. 5’9.5” dark complexion, blue eyes, light hair. enl. 9/3/61 Camp Lamon, Williamsport, Md. for three years. Pvt. Capt. Russell’s Co. 1st Va. Cav.(later Co. I. First Md Cav.). 12/30/61 on detached service Williamsport, Md. 5-6/62 detailed at the Ferry at Williamsport on Potomac. 3/9/64 on detached service, clerk in the Provost Marshall’s office Baltimore City, Md. by order of Brig. Gen. Lockwood S.O. No. 61, Par 9. 9/3/64 mustered out, term of service expired. d. 1921. Service Record; 1860 Census.

18. LEMEN, JACOB F.: b. 1842 enl. 9/6/61, mustered in 12/31/61 Williamsport, Md. Pvt. Capt. Zeller’s Co. 1st Reg’t Va. Volunteers (later Co. H. First Md Cav.). Present 1/61-4/63. POW 5-8/63. Present 9/63-12/64. Discharged 12/3/64 term of service expired. d. 1922. Service Record; 1860 Census.

19. LEMEN, THOMAS J.: b. 1843. enl. 9/3/61 Camp Lamon Pvt. Capt. Russell’s Co. 1st Va. Cav.(later Co. I. First Md Cav.) for three years. Present 3-4/62-8/63. Promoted to corporal. 3/26/64 Reduced to Pvt. Present 4/64. 9/3/64 mustered out, term of service expired. d. 1908. – Service Record; 1860 Census.

William Morgan’s son, Augustine, with Mrs. Anna Morgan Getzendanner, recounted that fateful “join-up” day of April 18th, as his father left home:

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For some time, the ominous cloud of war hung over us, only to burst at length with all its stern reality. Though but six years of age, I can clearly recall the great anxiety and gloom that predominated. Owing to my extreme youth, I could not comprehend the fact that we were upon the verge of a great conflict. My parents solemnly conversed in low tones and all about the house seemed confusion for what my father informed me was the getting ready for his departure from home, and with his Company, of which he was Captain, to enter the Confederate Army. He said that there would be a great war and that his services were needed and that he must not shirk his duty. He also told me that I would be the only man left to protect my mother and little sisters. I inquired the meaning of war and Father made me understand – that war was fighting, killing, one army against another, cruel and barbarous but often a necessary evil and unavoidable. In good faith I was ready to accede to my father’s demands and my bosom swelled proudly at the confidence he imposed in me.

The eventful day arrived when my Father mounted upon George, a beautiful grey horse, at the head of his company, left for the war. We stood at the gate, my mother, little sisters and I, also Mammy Liza and Uncle Ned, servants of our home. We waved farewell and Mother wept though she little realized that war would endure for months and years. The parting from Father was painful and the responsibilities of protection of the house and family seemed in my childish idea, a heavy one. Father was a splendid equestrian and sat his horse with ease. Tall and slender, blue of eye, his hair dark as the raven’s wing, my father seemed to me a perfect type of what a soldier should be. – Getzendanner, Anna Morgan and Morgan Augustine C. “A Boy’s Recollections of the Civil War – 1861-1865.” Shepherdstown, WV: Self-published. pp. 1-2.

Morgan’s younger brother, Daniel (1835-1865) who was living on Shepherdstown’s German Street with their widowed mother, enlisted in Co. F the same day as William. Their brother, “Jack” Smith Morgan (1838-?) enlisted in Company F on May 11, 1861. Both in 1862 would seek places in other companies in the 1st Virginia as their brother became the commander of Company F. – Driver, p. 210.

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SATURDAY, JUNE 15, 1861 – CHARLES TOWN: NEWTON BAKER BREAKS WITH HIS PARENTS AND JOINS MORGAN’S AND HIS COUSINS’ CONFEDERATE COMPANY:

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Spending his days clerking in his father’s store that would in a year become the official Federal post office at that northeast corner of Church and German Streets in Shepherdstown, and daily with his mother and his prosperous, pro-Union uncle, David Billmyer – the stark choice weighed heavily upon nineteen-year-old Newton. Five more of his cousins would enlist later in Morgan’s Company F; while, still, three other kin of Newton’s would enlist in the Federal 1st Maryland Cavalry Regiment. – Snyder, pp. 49-51;

On the warm, clear Friday of June 15th, when the encamped Confederate soldiers and cavalry at Harpers Ferry rose to reveille at 4 AM and began leaving, most for Charlestown – up the road, Newton rode a fine bay mare from home toward Charlestown, joining, late that day, Morgan and his cousins at a campsite on the Bullskin Run a few miles south of Charlestown. Newton Baker became Private Baker of Co. F with a lot to learn. – Vairin; Service Record N. D. Baker.

Father Elias was a northern sympathizer and was not pleased to have his son Newton Diehl serving the Confederacy. Father Elias spoke to his son only once during the war. Records suggest that when his son was held prisoner at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, that that was the most likely moment Elias Baker went to bring his exchanged son out of prison. – Kenamond, pp. 21-22; Service Records.

In fact, by 1862 with the townspeople’s sympathies also splitting into two camps, Elias Baker, who would be appointed by President Lincoln to be Shepherdstown’s postmaster, a post he would hold until well after the war, diplomatically split mail delivery duties with his Confederate counterpart and fellow townsmen, Daniel Rentch.

Father Elias Baker’s postmaster job, starting in 1862, almost required him to shun his son.

A biographer of Newton’s son, wrote of the relationship between Elias and Newton when peacetime came:
Elias Baker was devoted to the Union, received an appointment from President Lincoln as postmaster at Shepherdstown, and retained the Federal office throughout the War. Son Newton Baker, as a member of the Cavalry commanded by Jeb Stuart, fought at Gettysburg, was captured, and exchanged to fight again at Richmond. . . but had a tolerant attitude that was one of his strongest qualities. He felt that the War ended with Lee’s surrender and he was willing to accept the Northern victory. Cramer pp. 13-15.

BAKER, NEWTON DIEHL: b. Washington County, Md. 10/3/41. 5’6″ fair complexion, brown hair, blue eyes. attended Wittenberg College one year. clerk Shepherdstown post office, Jefferson County. enlisted in the 1st Virginia Cavalry Charles Town 6/15/61 as Pvt. in Co. F. Present until detached to Gainesville 12/10/61. Captured Smithfield 5/31/63. Sent to Ft. McHenry. Exch. 6/63. Promoted 2nd Corp. Present until detailed as ordinance sgt of regt 11/15/63. Horse killed 8/19/64. Wounded in thigh Fishers Hill 9/22/64. Paroled Winchester 4/23/65. medical school 1868. surgeon for the B&O railroad. d. Martinsburg 1909. – Driver, Robert J. (1991). “1st Virginia Cavalry.” Lynchburg, Va.: H. E. Howard, Inc. Print.

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HOW COMING WAR DIVIDES, THEN DESTROYS FRIENDSHIPS AND MINDS:

By the month of June the circle of more robust characters that still retained their political sanity was small and diminishing daily. They did not drop off now after long and lingering arguments, painful doubts, rallyings, and relapses as formerly; but a normal mind would fall suddenly into incoherence and frenzy. Principles based upon the education and habits of a lifetime, sustained by the clearest views of interest, the pride of consistency, and every sentiment of honor, would perish in a night, like the gourd of Jonah. This change was easily discernible in the countenance and demeanor of its victims. Yesterday your friend looked in your face with a clear and earnest eye, and discussed questions calmly and logically. To-day he shunned you, his eye was restless and unsteady, his manner painfully excited, his talk full of incoherencies; in a short time you would perceive there was a total absorption of all his previous opinions, idiosyncrasies, social sympathies, and antipathies, moral and intellectual characteristics, in the prevailing frenzy. These phenomena, which at first excited indignation, grief, and amazement, in the course of time ceased to surprise, and became subjects of merriment. Among ourselves we speculated jocosely as to who would go under next; and in the privacy of our own souls entertained the question, whether it was the world around us or ourselves that was mad. It is useful, perhaps, but not the less humiliating to human pride, to test the depth and power of individual principle and will, to ascertain precisely for how many days and hours ones best-founded opinions and most positive convictions will maintain themselves unsupported against the current of society and the menaces of power. From the observations of these few months I have become convinced that no amount of clear conviction, rectitude of purpose, or moral heroism can long maintain a passive defense against the assaults of an active and fiery enthusiasm. Organization must meet organization; passion blaze out against passion; the audacious and unscrupulous spirit of revolution must be counteracted by a spirit as bold and remorseless as itself. The idea is expressed with more point and brevity in the popular epigram, “One must fight the Devil with fire.” The National Government had thus far lost every thing by its temporizing and conciliatory policy. –
Strother, David H. (July, 1866). “Personal Recollections of the Civil War.” Harpers Magazine. Cornell Digital Library – The Making of America. 19 July 2011. Web. 29 January 2014.

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1. NEWTON BAKER’S “MOST” DIVIDED CLAN (Pt. 1 of 4) (above) by Jim Surkamp
2. NEWTON BAKER “SEES THE ELEPHANT” MANASSAS, VA (Pt. 2 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-d-baker-sees-the-elep…
3. NEWTON BAKER’S LIFE IN THE FAMED FIRST VIRGINIA CAVALRY 1861-1865 (Pt. 3 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-bakers-life-in-the-fa…
4. NEWTON BAKER”S REMARKABLE SON (Pt. 4 of 4) by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-bakers-remarkable-son…

For References and Image Credits:
civilwarscholars.com/2016/02/newton-d-bakers-most-divided…

Nice Job Training In College photos

Some cool Job Training In College images:

National College for High Speed Rail
Job Training In College
Image by Department for Transport (DfT)
Ground breaking ceremonies at Birmingham and Doncaster sites mark the start of construction of the National College for High Speed Rail (NCHSR).

The college will provide the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail projects.

The National College for High Speed Rail took a significant step forward on Monday 9 May, as construction officially began on its two sites in Birmingham and Doncaster.

The breaking-ground ceremony launched the official start of construction on the two sites, in Birmingham’s Learning Quarter and at Doncaster’s Lakeside. The college is on track to open its doors to students in September 2017.

This is the latest milestone for the new high tech training facility, which will provide Britain’s workforce with the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail infrastructure projects.

Minister of State for Transport Robert Goodwill said:

“This landmark moment means we are one step closer to seeing students walk through the doors of the College in 2017, learning the cutting-edge skills we need to deliver HS2 and world-beating rail infrastructure.

“This shows the transformational effect that HS2 is already having on our country – boosting skills, generating jobs and supporting economic growth – before spades are in the ground next year.”

The minister visited the statue of Sir Nigel Gresley, designer of the Mallard steam locomotive whilst en route to Doncaster.

See the news story for further information.

Downtown London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Old South London, Ontario
Job Training In College
Image by Ken Lund
Gorgeous neighborhood not far from downtown London in the Old South neighborhood just off of Wellington Road.

London is a city located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city has a population of 366,151 according to the 2011 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

London and the Thames were named in 1793 by Lord Simcoe, who proposed the site for the capital of Upper Canada. The first European settlement was between 1801 and 1804 by Peter Hagerman. The village was founded in 1826 and incorporated in 1855. Since then, London has grown to be the largest Southwestern Ontario municipality and Canada’s 11th largest municipality, having annexed many of the smaller communities that surrounded it.

London is a regional centre of health care and education, being home to the University of Western Ontario, Fanshawe College, and several hospitals. The city hosts a number of musical and artistic exhibits and festivals, which contribute to its tourism industry, but its economic activity is centred on education, medical research, insurance, and information technology. London’s university and hospitals are among its top ten employers. London lies at the junction of Highway 401 and 402, connecting it to Toronto, Windsor, and Sarnia. It also has an international airport, train and bus station.

London’s economy is dominated by medical research, insurance, manufacturing, and information technology. Much of the life sciences and biotechnology-related research is conducted or supported by the University of Western Ontario, which adds about C.5 billion to the London economy annually.

The headquarters of the Canadian division of 3M are located in London. The London Life Insurance Company was founded there, as was Imperial Oil (in 1880) and both the Labatt and Carling breweries. The Libro Financial Group was founded in London 1951 and is the second largest credit union in Ontario. Canada Trust was also founded in London in 1864. The TD-Canada Trust tower is still one of the tallest buildings in London, and has been home to two nesting peregrine falcons for more than a decade.

General Dynamics Land Systems builds armoured personnel carriers in the city. There are 2,000 workers at GDLS Canada. A 3 million expansion project in 1984 temporarily made Kellogg’s Canada’s 106,000 m2 (1,140,000 sq ft) London plant one of the most technologically advanced manufacturing facilities in the Kellogg Company. In late 2013, Kellogg’s announced the closure of this plant by end of 2014, resulting in 500 jobs lost (production to move to Belleville and Michigan plants).

A portion of the city’s population work in factories outside of the city limits, including the General Motors automotive plant CAMI, and a Toyota plant in Woodstock.

The city is home to many festivals, funded by the London Arts Council, including Sunfest, the Home County Folk Festival, the London Fringe Theatre Festival, the Expressions in Chalk Street Painting Festival, Rock the Park, Western Fair, the London Ontario Live Arts Festival (LOLA) and The International Food Festival. The London Rib-Fest, where barbecue ribs are cooked and served, is the second largest barbecue rib festival in North America. Pride London Festival is the 11th largest Pride festival in Ontario. Sunfest, a World music festival, is the second biggest in Canada after Caribana in Toronto, and is among the top 100 summer destinations in North America.

Eldon House is the former residence of the prominent Harris Family and oldest surviving such building in London. The entire property was donated to the city of London in 1959 and is now a heritage site. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate The Eldon House’s role in Ontario’s heritage. The Banting House National Historic Site of Canada is the house where Sir Frederick Banting thought of the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Banting lived and practiced in London for ten months, from July 1920 to May 1921. London is also the site of the Flame of Hope, which is intended to burn until a cure for diabetes is discovered.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Nice Job Training In College photos

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Image from page 1266 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp03balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Pittsburgh, Cleveland A:Toledo R. R. Both of these lines are nowpart of the Pittsburgh and New Castle Divi-sions of the Baltimore and Ohio. In 1888 and 1880, Mr. Reed acted as assistantsuperintendent at Shar]3sburg, Pa., on theP. & W., and from 1891 to the present time, hehas been yardmaster at De Forest Junction. When ]Ir. Reed first went to De ForestJunction, twelve cars of ore was a full train onthe Lake Division, and eighteen cars east ofthat point was a full train. Xow we haulfifty-five cars, 100,000 lb. capacity, on the LakeBranch; or seventy-five cars of grain and boxcar freight. Interesting tales of the old days are told byMr. Reed. While his hair is white and he isnot as young as he once was, he still handleshis work in a sure and certain manner and isalways affable and kind, and always on the job. We trust that he has many years ofusefulness before him, and we wish him healthand happiness. Do ou recognize the gentleman on the rightof engine 2848? If vou work on the New

Text Appearing After Image:
KXGI.VEER R. Iv .KM.>^TR( )XePlease menlion our magazine when writing adrertisers THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE Castle Division or thereabouts, you surelyknow engineer Robert E. Armstrong. Bobis an honorary Safety committeeman and takesan active part in boosting employes meetings,the Magazine, and those things which tend toa better railroad. Right now he is closelystudying the individual fuel performance sheets.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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Nashua Community College Precision Machine Tool teaching lab and programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
Employment and Training Administration Assistant Secretary Jane Oates, right, of the U.S. Department of Labor, speaks with Nashua Community College President Lucille Jordan, center, and Mark Dodge, associate professor, on Oct. 19, 2012. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

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A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

DSC_1057
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin will join officials on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, in Huntington, from the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and the U.S. Economic Development Administration, along with local partners, for an announcement regarding ARC POWER Grant awards.

Below is a list of the West Virginia projects receiving funds:

Coalfield Development Corporation
,870,000
Natural Capital Investment Fund
,250,000
New River Gorge Regional Development Authority
7,500
Mercer County Regional Airport
,500,000
Hatfield-McCoy Trail
,372,275
EntreEd K-14
,196,450
Randolph County Development Authority
2,500
EdVenture Coding
,000
Hobet site planning
0,000
TOTAL
,988,725

West Virginia Grants POWER Grant Descriptions:

,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 work-training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue good-paying jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund, and develop a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a sustainable technical assistance grant and revolving loan fund—which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations—and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, create 225 new small business jobs, and utilize the capacity of a VISTA volunteer.

,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.

,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.

2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet—creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.

,000 ARC grant to the EdVenture Group to provide grant-writing assistance to apply for a POWER Implementation grant to train displaced workers in computer coding and other IT skills.

0,000 ARC grant to provide funding for development of a strategic plan for the Hobet Surface Mine site in Boone and Lincoln Counties. The strategic plan will assist in maximizing the fullest use of the site for economic development.

Breakdown of States Receiving Funding:

Percentage distribution of grant funds
West Virginia- ,988,725- 39.6%
Kentucky- ,736,384- 34.6%
Virginia- ,917,375- 11.6%
Ohio- ,022,758- 8.0%
Alabama- ,057,352- 4.2%
Pennsylvania- 0,000 – 2.0%
TOTAL- ,222,594- 100.0%

ARC Implementation Award Summaries, 8-22-16
•,750,000 ARC grant to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in Hazard, KY for the TechHire Eastern Kentucky (TEKY) Initiative: Developing a Technology-Driven Workforce project. The project will serve young adults aged 17-29 who are out of school, and older adults who are unemployed, laid-off, or underemployed by offering several avenues to industry-led accelerated technology training, paid work-based internships, and employment opportunities in IT careers. This comprehensive workforce development program will train 200 new workers, create 160 jobs, and serve to bolster existing and emerging sectors that rely on a skilled information technology workforce in 23 Eastern Kentucky counties. The program will provide the trained workers necessary for a private technology company to expand its operations into Eastern Kentucky.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY for the Kentucky College of Optometry (KYCO). EDA is also awarding ,974,100 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to purchase equipment, instructional supplies, and other materials to help launch a new College of Optometry. The college will both grow the healthcare workforce and improve access to vision care in Central Appalachia. KYCO will be only the second optometry college in the Appalachian Region, and will primarily serve Eastern Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, and Southwestern Virginia. Within the first three years of the award, KYCO will graduate 60 optometrists, provide care to 12,000 patients, and bring ,000,000 in direct economic impact to the regional economy.
•,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.
•,022,133 ARC grant to the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) in Berea, KY for the Economic Transition for Eastern Kentucky (ETEK) Initiative. The ARC award will expand fast-track retraining and entrepreneurial technical assistance services targeted to dislocated coal workers; establish an intern program aimed at placing former coal workers in the energy efficiency sector; and increase access to capital through a ,000,000 venture capital loan fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 100 new enterprises, serve 500 existing businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged financing to a 54-county region in Eastern Kentucky.
•,000,000 ARC grant to Ohio University in Athens, OH for the Leveraging Innovation Gateways and Hubs Toward Sustainability (LIGHTS) project. The ARC award will strengthen Southern Ohio’s entrepreneurial ecosystem by leveraging the capacity of four strategically located “Innovation Hubs” — which provide facilities, equipment and design/engineering expertise to entrepreneurs – and five regional “Gateway Centers” that link local entrepreneurs to a broad array of support services throughout the ecosystem. The project will build on the successful TechGROWTH Ohio model, create 360 new jobs, 50 new small businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged private investment to the area.
•,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 on-the-job training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue quality jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,500,000 ARC grant to Appalachian Sustainable Development in Abington, VA for the Central Appalachian Food Enterprise Corridor. This 5-state, 43-county project will develop a coordinated local foods distribution network throughout Central Appalachia, and will connect established and emerging producers in Ohio, West Virginia, Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and Eastern Kentucky to wholesale distribution markets. The ARC award will support planning, partner convening, and capacity building, as well as production and processing equipment, supplies, and labor costs, and will be supported by funding from the Just Transition Fund. The strengthened food corridor will act as regional economic driver — creating 120 jobs, retaining 250 jobs, and ultimately creating 95 new businesses.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.
•,464,251 ARC grant to the University of Kentucky Research Foundation in Lexington, KY for the Downtown Revitalization in the Promise Zone project. The ARC award — partnering with the Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky, the Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky, the Kentucky Promise Zone, Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR), and the Kentucky Mainstreet Program – will help revitalize the downtowns of 8 distressed towns in the Southeastern Kentucky Promise Zone. The project will provide each community with tailored economic studies that identify economic opportunities, support strategic planning sessions to capitalize on those opportunities, provide financial support for key steps to implement those strategies, and build local leadership and business capacity. The project will create 24 new downtown businesses, 72 new jobs, and leverage 0,000 in private investment.
•,417,375 ARC grant to Southwest Virginia Community College (SWCC) in Cedar Bluff, VA for the Retraining Energy Displaced Individuals (REDI) Center for Dislocated Coal Miners program. The REDI program will provide fast-track reemployment services directly to displaced coal miners — equipping them with the necessary skills to get back to work in a high-demand field, earning comparable wages to their previous employment. Through an intensive, accelerated program of coursework, workers can obtain credentialed skills in as little as four months, rather than the more traditional training periods of a year or more. Training will be focused on three sectors with local employment opportunities: advanced manufacturing, construction, and health technology. The program will certify 165 new trainees over the life of the award, and will be supported by funding from the Thompson Charitable Fund and the Virginia Tobacco Commission.
•,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Hatfield McCoy Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund and developing a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•7,150 ARC grant to the Shoals Entrepreneurial Center in Florence, AL for the Shoals Shift project. ARC funds will be used to offer a wide range of entrepreneurial programming, including improved access to capital and credit and development of strategies to increase the profitability of the region’s start-ups and existing businesses through more efficient use of broadband technologies. The programming includes training and activities for community members and student entrepreneurs from middle schools all the way to the university level. Activities will take place in a nine-county region covering parts of northwest Alabama, northeast Mississippi, and south central Tennessee. The project is expected to help create or retain 110 jobs, start 20 new businesses, and leverage ,000,000 in private investment.
•7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a technical assistance support program — which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations — and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, and create 225 new small-business jobs.
•2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet — creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.
•0,000 ARC grant to Pennsylvania Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc. in Russell, PA for the Nature Tourism Cluster Development in the PA Wilds project. The ARC award will be used to create a coordinated regional cluster development system to capitalize on Pennsylvania’s numerous nature-tourism assets that spread across 2,000,000 acres in 12 counties. This strategy will drive attendance to these natural attractions, and will be leveraged by 0,000 in match investments to develop a network of small businesses to support the increased demand for products and services in the area.

ARC Technical Assistance Award Summaries
Through the POWER Initiative, ARC is making funds available to assist organizations to develop plans, assess needs and prepare proposals to build a stronger economy for Appalachia’s coal-impacted communities.
•0,000 ARC grant to the West Virginia Development Office for the Hobet Strategic Plan. West Virginia will receive technical assistance to develop a detailed economic assessment and strategic plan for the best use of the Hobet Surface Mine Site in Boone and Lincoln Counties, previously the largest surface mining operation in the state.
•,000 ARC grant to The EdVenture Group in Morgantown, West Virginia for the Creating Opportunities, Diversifying Economy for displaced coal miners (CODE) project to develop a sustainable plan for economic diversification. The project being developed is expected to serve 12 counties in West Virginia.
•,202 ARC grant to the Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, Alabama, for the development of a strategic plan focusing on entrepreneurship in coal-impacted counties in the Appalachian part of Alabama. Innovation and increasing business startup activity will be the primary focus.
•,758 ARC grant to Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio, to analyze and develop a project plan for the Advanced Manufacturing Innovation and Commercialization Center. The project is expected to serve 14 counties in OH, PA, and WV.

POWER Special Projects Summaries
As part of the POWER Initiative, ARC is supporting several special projects to strengthen entrepreneurship, expand market opportunities, and address key issues in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•,000 for a partnership with the National Association of Counties Research Foundation to provide additional technical assistance to 11 teams from Appalachian coal communities that participated in the EDA-funded Innovation Challenge for Coal-Reliant Communities Program. This support includes grant writing, feasibility studies, strategic plan development or updates and capacity building to facilitate strategic and sustainable investments. Community teams are located in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•0,000 to continue a collaborative effort with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other federal partners to research opioid abuse and related problems of HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•0,000 for a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) to expand the Cool & Connected Initiative to help 10 Appalachian coal-impacted communities use broadband service to revitalize small-town main streets and promote economic development. Participating communities will receive technical assistance for strategic planning, as well as initial implementation support for the first steps of their plans. The communities are located in Alabama, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•2,000 to provide training, technical support, and expanded market opportunities to Appalachian-based coal supply chain companies through partnerships developed at MineExpo 2016, the world’s largest and most comprehensive exposition dedicated to mining equipment, products , and services. This trade show is part of the 2016 U.S. Commercial Service International Buyer Program schedule, which connects U.S. exhibitors with foreign buyer delegations at the show. ARC funds will be used to ensure the participation of companies from Appalachia and enable them to get international trade support tailored to the specific needs of the individual companies. Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission in Altoona, Pennsylvania, is coordinating the ARC assistance.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

Meet Heather Gruenberger_2
Job Training In College
Image by USFS Region 10
Heather Gruenberger was born in 1992 in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then moved to San Metro, California and Fresno California where she spent most of her younger years. She first became interested in forestry after visiting Yosemite National Park at the age of 8. Within the park she met a National Park Ranger who invited her to ride along while he did some errands. He showed her the different ecosystems, and informed her about the importance of keeping rivers and trails clean in order to provide a healthy environment for life. At around age 13 she moved to Central Point, Oregon to live with her Grandparents. She graduated from high school in 2010. While working two jobs, she attended a local community college pursue a career in forestry. On a whim, Heather walked into a Job Corps recruiter’s office where he explained what the Job Corps program is about and the opportunities that Job Corps provided. Heather decided to pursue this path and followed the steps provided by this program. She received a certification as a Dental Assistant and a Home Health Aide, prior to being placed in the “Advanced Forestry program” in North Carolina. On February 17, 2015 she was accepted into the Schenck Job Corps Program.

The Schenck CCC Forestry /Natural Resources Program prepare outstanding students for an exciting and challenging career in a natural resource organization. The program is an accredited training opportunity recognized by the Commission of the Council on Occupational Education. Training includes a blend of academics, natural resources technical orientation, and opportunities to develop and maintain a professional network. The academics include studies in math, English, computer and technological skills, and studying skills.

Under this program, here in Yakutat, Heather will be provided the opportunity to become oriented with basic concepts of recreation and trail management, fish and wildlife, botany, archeology, office administration, youth outreach, and more. She has already been an intragral part of the Yakutat Tern Festival as well as some cabins and trails work.

Nashua Community College Precision Machine Tool teaching lab and programs
Job Training In College
Image by AMPedNH
Nashua Community College precision machine tool teaching lab and program staff and students. Mandatory credit: Desiree Crossley/Advanced Manufacturing Partnerships in Education (AMPed NH)

Nice Job Training In College photos

A few nice Job Training In College images I found:

DSC_1180
Job Training In College
Image by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin
Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin will join officials on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, in Huntington, from the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and the U.S. Economic Development Administration, along with local partners, for an announcement regarding ARC POWER Grant awards.

Below is a list of the West Virginia projects receiving funds:

Coalfield Development Corporation
,870,000
Natural Capital Investment Fund
,250,000
New River Gorge Regional Development Authority
7,500
Mercer County Regional Airport
,500,000
Hatfield-McCoy Trail
,372,275
EntreEd K-14
,196,450
Randolph County Development Authority
2,500
EdVenture Coding
,000
Hobet site planning
0,000
TOTAL
,988,725

West Virginia Grants POWER Grant Descriptions:

,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 work-training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue good-paying jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund, and develop a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a sustainable technical assistance grant and revolving loan fund—which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations—and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, create 225 new small business jobs, and utilize the capacity of a VISTA volunteer.

,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.

,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.

2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet—creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.

,000 ARC grant to the EdVenture Group to provide grant-writing assistance to apply for a POWER Implementation grant to train displaced workers in computer coding and other IT skills.

0,000 ARC grant to provide funding for development of a strategic plan for the Hobet Surface Mine site in Boone and Lincoln Counties. The strategic plan will assist in maximizing the fullest use of the site for economic development.

Breakdown of States Receiving Funding:

Percentage distribution of grant funds
West Virginia- ,988,725- 39.6%
Kentucky- ,736,384- 34.6%
Virginia- ,917,375- 11.6%
Ohio- ,022,758- 8.0%
Alabama- ,057,352- 4.2%
Pennsylvania- 0,000 – 2.0%
TOTAL- ,222,594- 100.0%

ARC Implementation Award Summaries, 8-22-16
•,750,000 ARC grant to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in Hazard, KY for the TechHire Eastern Kentucky (TEKY) Initiative: Developing a Technology-Driven Workforce project. The project will serve young adults aged 17-29 who are out of school, and older adults who are unemployed, laid-off, or underemployed by offering several avenues to industry-led accelerated technology training, paid work-based internships, and employment opportunities in IT careers. This comprehensive workforce development program will train 200 new workers, create 160 jobs, and serve to bolster existing and emerging sectors that rely on a skilled information technology workforce in 23 Eastern Kentucky counties. The program will provide the trained workers necessary for a private technology company to expand its operations into Eastern Kentucky.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY for the Kentucky College of Optometry (KYCO). EDA is also awarding ,974,100 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to purchase equipment, instructional supplies, and other materials to help launch a new College of Optometry. The college will both grow the healthcare workforce and improve access to vision care in Central Appalachia. KYCO will be only the second optometry college in the Appalachian Region, and will primarily serve Eastern Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, and Southwestern Virginia. Within the first three years of the award, KYCO will graduate 60 optometrists, provide care to 12,000 patients, and bring ,000,000 in direct economic impact to the regional economy.
•,196,450 ARC grant to the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education in Charleston, WV for the EntreEd K-14: Every Student, Every Year project. The EntreEd program enables K-12 teachers to integrate entrepreneurial content and context into delivery of required standards in any subject or grade level. The project will educate the next generation of Appalachia’s workforce to create their own businesses to drive the local economy. ARC funds will expand the footprint of the proven EntreEd program into five additional counties in West Virginia, eleven counties in Kentucky, three counties in Ohio, one county in Tennessee, and two counties in Virginia. The program will be supported by expertise from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), project management from the EdVenture Group, and funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The EntreEd program will serve 15,000 K-12 Appalachian students in 50 individual schools and 7 community colleges over the life of the award.
•,022,133 ARC grant to the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) in Berea, KY for the Economic Transition for Eastern Kentucky (ETEK) Initiative. The ARC award will expand fast-track retraining and entrepreneurial technical assistance services targeted to dislocated coal workers; establish an intern program aimed at placing former coal workers in the energy efficiency sector; and increase access to capital through a ,000,000 venture capital loan fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 100 new enterprises, serve 500 existing businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged financing to a 54-county region in Eastern Kentucky.
•,000,000 ARC grant to Ohio University in Athens, OH for the Leveraging Innovation Gateways and Hubs Toward Sustainability (LIGHTS) project. The ARC award will strengthen Southern Ohio’s entrepreneurial ecosystem by leveraging the capacity of four strategically located “Innovation Hubs” — which provide facilities, equipment and design/engineering expertise to entrepreneurs – and five regional “Gateway Centers” that link local entrepreneurs to a broad array of support services throughout the ecosystem. The project will build on the successful TechGROWTH Ohio model, create 360 new jobs, 50 new small businesses, and bring ,000,000 in leveraged private investment to the area.
•,870,000 ARC grant to the Coalfield Development Corporation in Wayne, WV for the Appalachian Social Entrepreneurship Investment Strategy. ARC funds will be used to incubate job-creating social enterprises; scale-up Coalfield Development Corporation’s innovate 33-6-3 on-the-job training/education/life skills workforce development model; and expand Coalfield Development Corporation’s service territory to other coal-impacted areas in Southern West Virginia. The award will create 85 new jobs and equip 60 trainees to pursue quality jobs in high-demand industries in the Appalachian Region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,500,000 ARC grant to Appalachian Sustainable Development in Abington, VA for the Central Appalachian Food Enterprise Corridor. This 5-state, 43-county project will develop a coordinated local foods distribution network throughout Central Appalachia, and will connect established and emerging producers in Ohio, West Virginia, Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and Eastern Kentucky to wholesale distribution markets. The ARC award will support planning, partner convening, and capacity building, as well as production and processing equipment, supplies, and labor costs, and will be supported by funding from the Just Transition Fund. The strengthened food corridor will act as regional economic driver — creating 120 jobs, retaining 250 jobs, and ultimately creating 95 new businesses.
•,500,000 ARC grant to the Bluewell Public Service District in Bluefield, WV for the Mercer County Regional Airport Development and Diversification Initiative. EDA is also awarding ,000,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be used to extend public water service along Route 52 and Airport Road to the Mercer County Regional Airport. In addition to providing essential infrastructure to the regional airport, the project will create 38 new jobs, and will capitalize on an existing regional asset by providing funding for a strategic plan that will position the airport and its adjoining 200 acres of flat, developable land as an economic driver for four counties in Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia.
•,464,251 ARC grant to the University of Kentucky Research Foundation in Lexington, KY for the Downtown Revitalization in the Promise Zone project. The ARC award — partnering with the Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky, the Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky, the Kentucky Promise Zone, Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR), and the Kentucky Mainstreet Program – will help revitalize the downtowns of 8 distressed towns in the Southeastern Kentucky Promise Zone. The project will provide each community with tailored economic studies that identify economic opportunities, support strategic planning sessions to capitalize on those opportunities, provide financial support for key steps to implement those strategies, and build local leadership and business capacity. The project will create 24 new downtown businesses, 72 new jobs, and leverage 0,000 in private investment.
•,417,375 ARC grant to Southwest Virginia Community College (SWCC) in Cedar Bluff, VA for the Retraining Energy Displaced Individuals (REDI) Center for Dislocated Coal Miners program. The REDI program will provide fast-track reemployment services directly to displaced coal miners — equipping them with the necessary skills to get back to work in a high-demand field, earning comparable wages to their previous employment. Through an intensive, accelerated program of coursework, workers can obtain credentialed skills in as little as four months, rather than the more traditional training periods of a year or more. Training will be focused on three sectors with local employment opportunities: advanced manufacturing, construction, and health technology. The program will certify 165 new trainees over the life of the award, and will be supported by funding from the Thompson Charitable Fund and the Virginia Tobacco Commission.
•,372,275 ARC grant to the Hatfield McCoy Regional Recreation Authority in Man, WV for the Southern Coalfields Sustainable Tourism & Entrepreneurship Program. ARC funds will develop and implement a comprehensive program to expand tourism-related employment and businesses in southern West Virginia, and will foster Hatfield McCoy Trail expansion in Kentucky and Virginia. In addition, the award provides for the deployment of a coordinated marketing effort, which will increase the region-wide economic impact of the Trails by ,000,000 per year. The project will create 225 jobs and 50 new businesses along the Trails, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•,250,000 ARC grant to the Natural Capital Investment Fund, Inc. in Shepherdstown, WV for the Growing Triple Bottom Line Small Businesses in Coal Impacted Communities in Central Appalachia project. The ARC award will expand coal-impacted communities’ access to capital in Southern West Virginia by capitalizing a ,000,000 tourism-related revolving loan fund and developing a West Virginia New Markets Tax Credit Fund. The project will create 200 new jobs and 20 new businesses, bring ,000,000 of leveraged private investment into the region, and will be supported by funding from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.
•7,150 ARC grant to the Shoals Entrepreneurial Center in Florence, AL for the Shoals Shift project. ARC funds will be used to offer a wide range of entrepreneurial programming, including improved access to capital and credit and development of strategies to increase the profitability of the region’s start-ups and existing businesses through more efficient use of broadband technologies. The programming includes training and activities for community members and student entrepreneurs from middle schools all the way to the university level. Activities will take place in a nine-county region covering parts of northwest Alabama, northeast Mississippi, and south central Tennessee. The project is expected to help create or retain 110 jobs, start 20 new businesses, and leverage ,000,000 in private investment.
•7,500 ARC grant to the New River Gorge Regional Development Authority in Beckley, WV for the New River Gorge Region – Developing an Entrepreneurial Economy project. ARC funds will be used to establish a technical assistance support program — which will assist start-up businesses with hands-on technical aspects of their operations — and to hire social enterprise and region-wide business coaches. The project will yield 15 new businesses, improve 294 existing businesses, and create 225 new small-business jobs.
•2,500 ARC grant to the Randolph County Development Authority in Elkins, WV for the Hardwood Cluster Manufacturing Expansion Project. EDA is also awarding ,200,000 as part of this project. ARC funds will be utilized to expand a major cabinet manufacturer’s operation by 27,000 square feet — creating 45 new jobs and adding ,500,000 in annual wages to the regional economy. In addition, the award will strengthen the Hardwood Alliance Zone – a nine-county region in Central West Virginia containing a cluster of hardwood businesses.
•0,000 ARC grant to Pennsylvania Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc. in Russell, PA for the Nature Tourism Cluster Development in the PA Wilds project. The ARC award will be used to create a coordinated regional cluster development system to capitalize on Pennsylvania’s numerous nature-tourism assets that spread across 2,000,000 acres in 12 counties. This strategy will drive attendance to these natural attractions, and will be leveraged by 0,000 in match investments to develop a network of small businesses to support the increased demand for products and services in the area.

ARC Technical Assistance Award Summaries
Through the POWER Initiative, ARC is making funds available to assist organizations to develop plans, assess needs and prepare proposals to build a stronger economy for Appalachia’s coal-impacted communities.
•0,000 ARC grant to the West Virginia Development Office for the Hobet Strategic Plan. West Virginia will receive technical assistance to develop a detailed economic assessment and strategic plan for the best use of the Hobet Surface Mine Site in Boone and Lincoln Counties, previously the largest surface mining operation in the state.
•,000 ARC grant to The EdVenture Group in Morgantown, West Virginia for the Creating Opportunities, Diversifying Economy for displaced coal miners (CODE) project to develop a sustainable plan for economic diversification. The project being developed is expected to serve 12 counties in West Virginia.
•,202 ARC grant to the Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, Alabama, for the development of a strategic plan focusing on entrepreneurship in coal-impacted counties in the Appalachian part of Alabama. Innovation and increasing business startup activity will be the primary focus.
•,758 ARC grant to Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio, to analyze and develop a project plan for the Advanced Manufacturing Innovation and Commercialization Center. The project is expected to serve 14 counties in OH, PA, and WV.

POWER Special Projects Summaries
As part of the POWER Initiative, ARC is supporting several special projects to strengthen entrepreneurship, expand market opportunities, and address key issues in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•,000 for a partnership with the National Association of Counties Research Foundation to provide additional technical assistance to 11 teams from Appalachian coal communities that participated in the EDA-funded Innovation Challenge for Coal-Reliant Communities Program. This support includes grant writing, feasibility studies, strategic plan development or updates and capacity building to facilitate strategic and sustainable investments. Community teams are located in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•0,000 to continue a collaborative effort with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other federal partners to research opioid abuse and related problems of HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) in Appalachia’s coal communities.
•0,000 for a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) to expand the Cool & Connected Initiative to help 10 Appalachian coal-impacted communities use broadband service to revitalize small-town main streets and promote economic development. Participating communities will receive technical assistance for strategic planning, as well as initial implementation support for the first steps of their plans. The communities are located in Alabama, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.
•2,000 to provide training, technical support, and expanded market opportunities to Appalachian-based coal supply chain companies through partnerships developed at MineExpo 2016, the world’s largest and most comprehensive exposition dedicated to mining equipment, products , and services. This trade show is part of the 2016 U.S. Commercial Service International Buyer Program schedule, which connects U.S. exhibitors with foreign buyer delegations at the show. ARC funds will be used to ensure the participation of companies from Appalachia and enable them to get international trade support tailored to the specific needs of the individual companies. Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission in Altoona, Pennsylvania, is coordinating the ARC assistance.

Photos available for media use. All photos should be attributed “Photo courtesy of Office of the Governor.”

BC provides more than 0,000 to support new viticulture diploma at Okanagan College
Job Training In College
Image by BC Gov Photos
The Province is providing over 8,000 to support a two-year pilot project for the viticulture technician diploma program at Okanagan College, developed in partnership with the BC Wine Grape Council.

The diploma is designed to provide hands-on, theoretical and practical knowledge that will allow students to eventually work as part of a vineyard management team. The program is structured around the viticulture growing season, providing opportunities to develop and apply skills like: canopy management, pest control, pruning, training vines and sensory evaluation.

Learn more: news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2017JTST0128-001045

National College for High Speed Rail
Job Training In College
Image by Department for Transport (DfT)
Ground breaking ceremonies at Birmingham and Doncaster sites mark the start of construction of the National College for High Speed Rail (NCHSR).

The college will provide the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail projects.

The National College for High Speed Rail took a significant step forward on Monday 9 May, as construction officially began on its two sites in Birmingham and Doncaster.

The breaking-ground ceremony launched the official start of construction on the two sites, in Birmingham’s Learning Quarter and at Doncaster’s Lakeside. The college is on track to open its doors to students in September 2017.

This is the latest milestone for the new high tech training facility, which will provide Britain’s workforce with the specialist training, skills and qualifications required to build HS2 and future rail infrastructure projects.

Minister of State for Transport Robert Goodwill said:

“This landmark moment means we are one step closer to seeing students walk through the doors of the College in 2017, learning the cutting-edge skills we need to deliver HS2 and world-beating rail infrastructure.

“This shows the transformational effect that HS2 is already having on our country – boosting skills, generating jobs and supporting economic growth – before spades are in the ground next year.”

The minister visited the statue of Sir Nigel Gresley, designer of the Mallard steam locomotive whilst en route to Doncaster.

See the news story for further information.