Tag Archive for work

Dress For Success – What To Wear To Work

Roberta Hughes, image expert for Fortune 500 companies provides timeless image advice and training for business professionals. This image training DVD includes powerful makeovers and image tips on business casual dress, professional dress, modesty, hair, makeup, personal hygiene and more! Learn more at www.avidereimage.com. Call 801.653.9000 to schedule a private virtual image consultation with Roberta Hughes.
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Premier Wynne announces how Ontario is helping the province’s aerospace sector grow by supporting a partnership between Centennial College and Bombardier that will help train more people to work in the industry.

Check out these Job Training In College images:

Premier Wynne announces how Ontario is helping the province’s aerospace sector grow by supporting a partnership between Centennial College and Bombardier that will help train more people to work in the industry.
Job Training In College
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Image from page 852 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
Job Training In College
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp05balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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sistant division engineer, succeed-ing C. E. S. Rozelle, who resigned to go backeast. Mr. Stewart was formerly an engineerin the office of the district engineer mainte-nance of way at Cincinnati, and those who arepersonally acquainted with him feel that abetter man for the position as assistant divisionengineer could not be found. On the nights of January 11 and 12 this divi~sion was in the grip of the worst blizzard thatwe have had around here for years. Withintwenty-four hours the temperature had droppedalmost fifty degrees. Snow was drifted on thetracks in some places three to eight feet deepand one-half mile long. With the temperatureabout fifteen to twenty degrees below zero it.was almost impossible to get anything done.Some trains, however, succeeded in gettingover the road on the twelfth, and there was alittle improvement the following day, but therewere still several drifts that were very hard toget through. All passenger trains had to bedouble-headed, which almost stopped the

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^You Get The Job Weve been watching you, young man. We knowvoure made of the stuff that wins. The man thatcares enough about his future to study an I. C. S.course in his spare time is the kind we want in thisroad s responsible positions. Youre getting yourpromotion on what you know, and I wish we hadmore like you. The boss cant take chances. When he has a re-sponsible job to fill, he picks a man trained to hold it.Hes watching you right now, hoping youll be readywhen the opportunity comes. The thing for you to do is to start today and trainyourself to do some one thing better than others.You can do it in spare time through the InternationalCorrespondence Schools. Over 5000 men reported ad-vancement last year as a result of their I. C. S. training. The first step these men took was to mark andmail this coupon. Make your start the same way—and make it right now. ■EAR OUT HERE INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS Box 8505, SCRANTON, PA. Explain, without obligating me, how I can quali

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Image from page 934 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
Job Training In College
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp03balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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nue loading in an effort to avoid an accumu-lation, as loads were being received at the plantconsiderably in excess of their limited unloadingfacilities. R. L. Hixon, agent at Gilboa, is the proudfather of a baby boy, which arrived October 1.Latest reports are that mother and son aregetting along nicely. Brakeman L. W. Jenkins is all smiles. ^ Heis the proud father of a baby girl, which arrivedon October 21. Indianapolis Division (C. H. & D.) Correspondent, Roy Powell, SuperintendentsOffice Divisional Safety Committee M. V. Hynes Superintendent, Chairman F. M. Connor Trainmaster H. F. Passel Division Engineer E. Boas Master Mechanic E. 1. Partlow Road Foreman of Engines D. J. Curran Agent, Indianapolis W. H. Bettcher Geneial Car Foreman, Moorefield P. H. Baker General Foreman, Moorefield H. F. Reynolds General Yardmaster E. L. AiTLT Conductor, State St., Indianapolis L. Hanlon , Engineer, Moorefield R. J Thiell Agent, Decatur j^DETERMINATIQN [self-confidence (concentration) ^->

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^,;.:5b«^•»^^^^- d^) Men Wanted For Good-Paying Traffic Positions to $ 1OO a Week ^W In the above picture is shown the hand of James J. Hill, who controls the ^eat railroadsystem extending from Lake Superior to Puget Sound. Mr. Hill began railroading while ayoung man, under circumstances much less favorable than those under which young men oftoday can begin. His first railroad job was that of a telegraph operator. Perhaps there isnot a man who will read this announcement who is not familiar with the record of this noted,self-instructed, self-made railroad and transportation king. There is nothing mysteriousabout his rapid rise from a little country railroad station job to a position of power andaffluence. The above drawing shows the five main elements of Mr. Hills success—the fiveelements that will make you successful. But YOU can now readily Train for Promotion At Home By Mail Perhaps you have not known that with theuse of your spare time and evenings you canqualify for wor

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How to Dress for Success at Work

How to Dress for Success at Work

Want to look professional on a budget? Forbes contributor Dorie Clark – author of Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future – shares four sartorial tips for executives.

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Work from home Atlanta | Home Jobs in Georgia

http://tinymart.org

Do you wish to work from home in Atlanta? Your home job is waiting for you.

There are so many naysayers when it comes to believing whether or not you can actually work from home. People either don’t want to believe it, because it might force them to do something about their own situation of trading their time for pennies.

However, there are so many people on the internet who are proving that you CAN make money from home by using your computer and learning the necessary skills it takes.

I”m proof of that. I started back in 2007 doing bum marketing. I wrote about 100 articles for ezinearticles and started linking to my websites and promoting affiliates offers and more.
I was fortunate to actually make money soon after I began with a company that is still in business today.

You can contact me for that company .. it is probably the easiest and fastest way to see profit. So if you want an ego boost, I will share that with you.

Connect with me on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/felecia.lynn.549

.. and tell me that you want the link to my first profitable adventure online.

Working from home in Atlanta or any other place in the United States or world, for that matter is about knowledge, action, and determination.

“Those who succeed never quit and those who doubt, never start.” Felecia Townsend

Seriously, I just made that up .. so i hope it hasn’t been said before. In fact, I think I will post it on my wall.

Start today by clicking on the link below the video and even if you don’t start, subscribe to this channel to gain emotional and personal momentum.

http://www.youtube.com/ineednewleads
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By: Randy Travis

Aired: Jan 19 2017

ATLANTA – When the lights in the Georgia Dome fade to black after the final Falcons game there Sunday, some people who live in its shadow will still be asking the same question: will they ever be able to rise up, too?

They’re the ones who remembered the major investments promised to their neighborhood when the Dome was first built 25 years ago.

“They were promised millions of dollars and it did not materialize,” agreed John Gordon of the group Friends of English Avenue.

So will the .5 billion Mercedes-Benz Dome be any better for the people who live across the street?

There are some signs — measured in inches, not yards — that things could be changing in the right direction.

“This is my neighborhood. I live here,” Benjamin Wills, 30, pointed out as we walked along North Avenue near Lindsay Street. “So I’m a neighbor just as much as I’m the principal of this school.”

The school is Peace Preparatory Academy, the first school to operate in this neighborhood in the last 20 years. Right now 36 children spend at least part of the day inside a converted church, getting three meals and a safe education.

For years though this has been a place on the map largely known for two things: first, a cheap, overflow parking destination for Falcons fans, including those who will be back again Sunday.

“We won’t be tailgating but there will be people parking in front of our home for sure,” Wills predicted. “So we’ll get to be part of the fanfare whether we want to or not.”

But mostly this has been a place the feds once called the largest outdoor heroin market in the Southeast, where a largely white customer base from outside Atlanta kept dealers hustling around the clock.

In the summer of 2015 local and federal authorities decided to try something new here. They invited 20 people the community identified as low level drug dealers and gave them a choice to turn their lives around or face federal charges if they returned to selling heroin. Police say four of the 20 didn’t think they were serious.

They were. All four face federal drug charges. The busy streets seem quieter now. We noticed it. The people who live here noticed it, too.

John Gordon spent the last decade trying to make life better in the English Avenue neighborhood, ever since the Atlanta businessman was moved to action by news stories about corrupt cops killing an elderly woman, Kathryn Johnston, inside her home.

His non-profit helped create two community gardens in places where only drug dealers and weeds once thrived. They also bought homes to provide for police officers now trusted by the neighborhood.

In fact, a tip from someone in English Avenue led Atlanta Police and federal authorities to bust up a heroin network here using Facebook to advertise its wares. Four pleaded guilty this week to conspiracy to distribute heroin.

“I think there’s ample evidence to support the belief that things are on the upswing,” Gordon observed.

“You still wouldn’t come over here after the sun goes down, would you?” I asked.

“I would not,” Gordon replied without hesitation. “I’ve been here and left that church at night and you can hear gunfire.”

The US Attorney’s office says arrests have dropped nearly 40 percent here since they started the Drug Market Intervention program. They admit some of the drug dealing may just not be as obvious as the guys dealing on the streets or through social media.

“Do you feel safer, do you think your kids are safer walking the streets in this area now?” I asked principal Wills.

“I think in some ways it’s just shifted and changed. When you’re talking about the trajectory of someone’s life, I mean that’s going to take a long time.”

Falcons owner Arthur Blank’s Foundation has pledged a minimum of million on the Westside communities, with millions more coming from other groups. The idea is to attract investment to create new jobs and businesses. You can click here to see where the money has gone so far.

“Are you comfortable with the Blank Foundation’s commitment to this neighborhood?” I asked Wills.

“I don’t question the intent. I do question the implementation.”

Little things, like the wooden planters we sat on during his interview. Wills says Blank company volunteers dropped them and a picnic table across the street from his school one day without ever asking what he thought.

“As you can see, it doesn’t look very beautiful because there’s no ownership to it,” Wills pointed out as we looked at the dead plants inside. “I’m not sure how many people would sit here and have lunch at the picnic table in front of this house that looks like it’s about to fall into itself.”

Gordon saw it differently.

“I have every belief that Blank’s commitment is real,” he stressed.

FULL STORY: http://www.fox5atlanta.com/news/i-team/230153712-story
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Purple Mt Lofty sandstone in Macclesfield. Danckers house and shop built around 1851. 16 paned windows. Slight curve over window.Keystone over doorway. Wonderful stone work.

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Purple Mt Lofty sandstone in Macclesfield. Danckers house and shop built around 1851. 16 paned windows. Slight curve over window.Keystone over doorway. Wonderful stone work.
Tenants Rights
Image by denisbin
Macclesfield and the Davenports.
This pretty little town near the banks of the Angas River was part of the Special Survey taken out by George Davenport in 1840 called the Upper Angas Survey. Davenport took out the survey with Roger Cunliffe and Frederick Luck after his eldest son Francis Davenport had selected the area for their 4,000 acres. Luck and Cunliffe are memorialised by street names in Macclesfield. George Davenport a banker and investor returned to England in 1841 and returned in 1843 with his wife and children and his two brothers Samuel and Robert ready to establish himself in the new colony. But George died soon after returning in 1843 so his brothers took over the land at Macclesfield. The Davenports were agents for the earl of Macclesfield hence the naming of the town. Another brother Henry gave his second name Devereux to one of the town streets. The main street Venables street is named after Samuel’s wife’s maiden name. Samuel Davenport also took up farming land at Beaumont where he donated some of it for the Beaumont Common. The Davenports owned many of the town blocks and they only sold their town land and their farming estate outside the town in 1924. Their estate was the Battunga estate where some of the Davenports (mainly Robert and his family) lived and were eventually buried. Other areas of the Central Hills were also taken up at this time by Special Surveys. They included the Angas River Survey at Strathalbyn by George Fife Angas, the Meadows Survey by Charles Flaxman, the Three Brother Survey at Echunga for Hack and others, and the Green Hills Survey at Bull Reek for Sir John Morphett. These surveys were in addition to the Mt Barker Survey and the Native Valley Survey at Nairne for Matthew Smillie. The wealthy property developers all had a good eye for well-watered high rainfall land.

Macclesfield was laid out on Davenport land in 1848 but it grew very slowly as the Victorian gold rushes took men away from the district from 1851. But the town progressed slowly as it was on the way to Strathalbyn and the nearest river port to Adelaide which was a Milang. In the railway age it was completely bypassed as the train line to Strathalbyn in 1883 took another route beyond Mt Barker. Macclesfield was lucky in that an early architect lived in the town, Frederick Danker the son of the Macclesfield draper and it had access to some local low grade white marble and to the beautiful purple Mount Lofty sandstone which was used in the early 1850s as a building material. The first major public structure in the town was the Congregational Church which was on land donated by Samuel Davenport. Reverend John Austin a gentleman farmer and minister took over ministry at the church in 1850 two years after it had been built. This church is not much younger than the Anglican Church at Blakiston. It has fine pointed Gothic windows and is made of golden sandstone. The last service were held here in 1927. The church was then used for church camps but it is now a residence. The Davenports were all staunch Congregationalists. The church is on the north western side of Davenport Square the central park of Macclesfield. Almost next door to the church facing Davenport Square is the original police station with 16 paned Georgian style windows and two front doors. It dates from the early 1850s and the old lockups are still in the back yard. Across the main road from Davenport Square is the current Anglican Church in local white marble stone. It replaced the early church in 1926 although the land for it was purchased in 1913. The church cost £700 to build.

A stroll along the main street, Venables Street and the parallel street to the east, Luck street will show you most of the interesting old buildigns in Macclesfield except for a few in the street parallel to the west which is Cuncliffe Street. Starting at the northern end of Venables Street south of Davenport Square:
•On the east corner are the old butcher shop cottages. This land was leased from the Davenports in the 1840s by a wheelwright and then a butcher. The buildigns date from the 1850s and 1860s.
•Opposite is the original school room now the RSL building. It is made of Mt Lofty pink/purple sandstone and was erected as a town school in 1857. Note the fireplace on the front wall. When a new school opened in Cunliffe Street this school was sold to the RSL. Note the cut keystones above the 24 paned windows.
•Next is the Macclesfield Hotel built around 1850 although not much of this original building still remains. It was licensed from 1850 and it was extensively remodelled with a second storey was added in 1882.
•Across the street are Mulberry Cottages built in 1862. The original owner gave his trade as tin worker or tinker.
•Next is the Institute building erected in 1881 of purple sandstone. It has a classical facade with dressed quoins and good symmetry. Note the triangular pediment above the front door. The architect was Frederick Danker who also designed the Stirling Institute, the old Queen Victoria Maternity Hospital, other churches and grand houses in the Adelaide Hills.
•Frederick Danker’s father’s store is next door. Henry Danker had this store built in 1851 of purple sandstone. The store was also his residence for his wife and six children. Walk down the alley between it and the Institute and see the unusual cantilevered rear balcony to the house. The fine Georgian style of the house and residence is impressive. Note the decorative arch for the recessed front door, the small pediment to hide the roof line etc. The single storey shop adjoining the two storey residence was probably built around 1860.
•Across the street is the Three Brothers Arms Hotel which was established in 1841 by S Jackson. In the 1850s it was capitalising on the bullock trade to the port of Milang. The hotel was extended in 1848 and again in 1882 and then it was unfortunately “modernised” in 1955. It started life as the Goats’ head Hotel and then became the Davenport Arms before its more recent name was adopted. Make sure you walk inside and look at the gigantic timber beams.
•Next along the street is Dixon’s store and house also in purple sandstone and also in Georgian style. The front veranda is a more recent addition and the original 12 paned windows have been replaced. It was built around 1860 as a chemist shop.
•DIVERSION. If you take the small lane on the right or western side and cross the creek on a foot bridge to you get to Cunliffe Street. In this street look for the former Wesleyan Methodist Church on the corner built in 1857. A vestry was added in 1936 and the whole building was unfortunately rendered in 1955. It then became the Uniting Church. Turn right and walk north to look at the old Brewery site which is behind the Three Brothers Arms Hotel. The brewery need a good water supply so it was sited on the creek bank. It began in 1851 by W Miller and the stone complex was built in 1868. Eventually William Danker purchased the brewery and it continued operating until 1903. At that time it was converted into a cheese and butter factory that operated until 1937. Then a new butter factory opened further along Cunliffe Street. It was the Jacobs Dairy Factory. It was sold to Southern Farmers in 1975 and they immediately closed it. Return to the Main Street over the footbridge.
•Back in Venables Street you will see next the Heinrich Barn with an historical marker in front of it. This old barn has recently been restored. It was built in 1860 for a wheelwright and then it became a blacksmith’s shop. Later it was used as a coach depot.
• Across the street is the Cummins Cottage which was built in the 1860s. Part of it was used as a chemist shop. It has a very steep roof.
•Take the next street to the left and then turn left again at the next street with is Luck Street and is parallel to the Main Street.
•On the corner as you turn is the old Anglican cemetery. It is worth exploring as the first Anglican Church was built on this spot too. The land was donated by Robert Davenport. The church opened in 1857 but the interior was not finished until 1863. It was demolished in 1926 when the new Anglican Church was opened on the road to Adelaide. There ae some interesting old graves in this cemetery and some unusual old red brick grave enclosures with curved edge topping bricks.
•A bit further along Luck Street is the Catholic Church which opened in 1876. It is a large Gothic building but with no interesting features. The Davenports encouraged Irish tenant farmers to their rented lands and they were the ones who used this church. A convent school also operated on this site. Behind the church is an old foot bridge back to the main street. It opened in 1883 and was totally rebuilt in 1989.
•On the eastern side of Luck Street all in a row are three other interesting buildings. They begin with the Wenzel Kepert Cottage. Kepert was a shoemaker hence the steep German style roof with stone quoins and the unusual half rounded top on the roof. Usually such a roof line indicates that a blacksmith operated in the building. ‘
•Next to it is another old cottage which was a blacksmith’s works and cottage. A Mr Robinson operated it in the 1850s for a time but a store operated in this building through to the 1930s. Perhaps he did his blacksmithing in the cottage next door?
•The third building is a 1870s cottage with an elevated veranda, brick quoins and a three quarter cellar. Now return to the main street.

Image from page 143 of “A tribute for the Negro; being a vindication of the moral, intellectual, and religious capabilities of the coloured portion of mankind; with particular reference to the African race” (1848)
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Identifier: tributefornegrob00armi
Title: A tribute for the Negro; being a vindication of the moral, intellectual, and religious capabilities of the coloured portion of mankind; with particular reference to the African race
Year: 1848 (1840s)
Authors: Armistead, Wilson, 1819?-1868
Subjects: Black race Slavery Blacks African Americans
Publisher: Manchester, W. Irwin American agent, W. Harned, New York [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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it, a sordid mind,Unfit to be the tenant of mans noble form. * The great doctrine, that God hath created all menequal, and endowed them with certain inalienable rights,and that amongst these are life, liberty, and the pursuit ofhappiness, is affirmed in the American Declaration of In-dependence, and justified in the theory of its constitutionallaws. But there is a stain upon its glory ; Slavery, in itsmost abject and revolting form, pollutes its soil ; the wait-ings of Slaves mingle with its songs of liberty; and theclank of their chain is heard, in horrid discord, with thechorus of their triumphs. The records of the States arenot less distinguished by their wise provisions for securingthe order and maintaining the institutions of the country,than by their ingenious devices for riveting the chain, andperpetuating the degradation of, their Coloured brethren ;—their education is branded as a crime,—their freedom isdreaded as a blasting pestilence,—the bare suggestion of * Cowper.

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m

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Harris: Expungement Bill Puts People to Work

Pa. state Rep. Jordan Harris joined Governor Tom Wolf today as he signed into law a bill that expands criminal record sealing in Pennsylvania in order to reduce recidivism, relieve the pardon system, and provide ex-offenders greater opportunity to join the workforce. Rep. Harris knows this will give a second chance to tens of thousands of Pennsylvanians who are held back by a minor crime or charge years ago.
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Image from page 133 of “Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the

A few nice Resume images I found:

Image from page 133 of “Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the
Resume
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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ing. May God bless you and your fellow laborers intie great work you have undertaken in behalf of yourrace. Yours Yery sincerely in Christ, JJos. Rademacher,Bishop of Nashville. BISHOP MOORES LETTER. A.11 Saints Church,2542 Wallace St.Chicago, July 9th 1890.Mr. Da». A. Rudd, Dear Sir.—You will pleaseaccept my thanks for you kind invitation to be pres-ent at the convention of Colored Catholics in Cincin-nati, which reached me here only yesterday evening,too late for acceptance even though I were not pre-vented by other engagements from attending. Your efforts for the welfare and advaiicemt ofour Colored Catholics have my cordial approval, andI hope that your success will be equal to your mostsanguine expectations. JJohn Moobe, D.D.Bishop of St. Augustine. bishop gallagers letter St. Marys Cathedral,Galveston, Texas, July 14th 1890.Dear Mr. Rudd:—Your kind invitation to be presentat the Colored Catholic Congress came in due time,but I regret that I was not able to attend, nor had I

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Neukirchen-Vluyn – Zeche Niederberg Schacht II 01
Resume
Image by Daniel Mennerich
In 1857 several pit fields were consolidated in the area of the municipalities Neukirchen, Vluyn, Niephauserfeld , Kapellen and Moers under the name "Verein". The owners of this pit field possession founded in 1911 the Niederrheinische Bergwerks AG (N. B. A. G.) with headquarter in Moers, later in Neukirchen.

In 1912 one began in Dickscheheide between Neukirchen and Vluyn with the sink of the shaft I (to. Moers I). In 1913 the sink of the shaft II (Moers II) was tackled besides. To the south of the shaft arrangement it was begun with the construction of a work settlement which formed the architectural connection of the municipalities Neukirchen and Vluyn. Out of this originated later the town Neukirchen-Vluyn.

Caused by the outbreak of the First World War the sinking needed more time than planned, so that in 1917 first only shaft I could be started running. Shaft I reached in 1919 the sink and was put into operation in 1921, with all conveyor facilities provided.

The coal first supporting mine was during her beginning years because of the tense outlet in economic distress. Thus the company was put in 1932 temporarily. After 6-month shutdown the company could be resumed. Then the support developed steadily and crossed fast again the brand of 1 million tonnes of usable annual support. A briquet factory was pursued further. Furthermore the field possession was increased in western direction.

The very coming down sales situation of the space heating coal as well as the general situation in the outlet for home coal led with the Deutsche Steinkohle AG (DSK) in whose possession Niederberg had gone over, to the decision to uniting the mine to the end of the year in 2001 with "Friedrich Heinrich" to the "Mine West". This step occurred on the 28th of December, 2001 under complete job of the Niederberg shaft arrangements.

The dismantling of the remained stocks occurred from the "Mine West".

Image from page 19 of “Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the

Some cool Resume images:

Image from page 19 of “Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the
Resume
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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power of life anddeath, and yet he was the greatest of slaves, be-*cause he was the slave of his own passions. Lookat John, be was a free man, because his souldwelt within the kingdom of God and could notbe enslaved by the tyrant. Such i& the liberty weshould desire, by which we can conquer our pa>9>*stems. Tosday, I welcome you in my own name, inthe name of the clergy aud of the congregation ofSt. Augustines, and congratulate you on meetingfor the purpose which has called you together.Unless I am mistakeD, you will find this congrega-tion deserving of its reputation for intelligence andhospitality. The people of St. Augustines willbold out to you the hand of fellowship and makeyour stay here pleasant and agreeable. This day will mark an ora in the history of 9 the Colored Catholics of America. This is thefirst time they have asftmblfd, sud I Lave nodoubt tbat many good results will follow from thiscongress. It will strengthen you and give pddhionalfojco to your convictions.

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HON. J. A. Sll NCJ It, KOLTH CAROLINA In union th^re is strength. This is true inmercantile, social and religious life. Take a singledrop of water, how powerless it is. Add to itmillions of other drops, and what a force you have liOok at the father of waters, the mighty Mississippi,as it rolls from its source in the north down to thea;ulf. It is the giant highway of our country, asource of wealth and a blessing, but only when itis kept within bounds. Let it overleap the banks,and its path is marked with ruins. So with you, ifyou remain within the bounds of wislom, prudence,clarity and discretion, blessings will come upon you,your families and upon our country. Remember the eye of the whole country is uponyou. It is not the eye of friendship, but the sharpeye of criticism. Ilandsime is as handsome does.It is not for me to select the subjects for your consid-erations, they should be suggested by others. Whatis rno*re important in our day than Christianeducation? Without wliich society c

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Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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among thorns. Only the true love of God andof his neighbor for Gods sake can direct aright anygood work and lead us to the eternal reward preparedfor us in heaven. THIRD HAYS PROCEEDINGS. The congress was called to order by the Presi-dent at 10:30 oclock. The opening prayer was read by the Rev. FatherTolton. The minutes of the second days proceedingswere read and approved. ARCHUISHOr ELDER ATTENDS THE CONGRESS. The Most Eev. Archbishop Elder was introducedto the congress by the president in a few words veiycomplimentary to the distinguished prelate. Afterthe applause had ceased, the Archbishop said • Avery flattering introduction and a very flatteringspeech. I thank you for your warm greeting. Iacknowledge that I have come from Cincinnatiexpressly to meet you. I have pressing businessengagements and must be home by Monday. I am 51 not here to assist you, for you do not need my assist-ance toccarry on the work of this congress: I amhere to encourage you,- to remind you of some of the

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DR. W. S. LOFTON, DISTKICT COLUMBIA. fundamental1 truths which you already know. Iwould say, what I have done for your race at Natchezat the time thousands were sick with a terrible 5-2 disease was the most consoling work of my life.The years I have spent with the Colored people wereyears of encjuragemeut and renewed confidence inthe future of the Colored race. I know much ofthe Colored people, and my work among them onlyconfirmed the opinion I had previously formed ofthem. It gave me assurance that they were willingto listen to anything that might be said to them ofGod and of heaven. I dont think I have met onethat was not willing to listen to me when I spoke ofthe necessity of serving God, to s-ay their prayers,and approach the sacraments. God gives those whowork for Him great graces and enables them to go onin their work of elevating men and preparing themto receive the blessing which flows from that work.I will not detain you, but bid you God speed. Restassured 1 will remember you

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Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
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ens, who, by reason of prejudice of color, bavebeen deprived of those educational advantages whichare so fresly extended to people of every race andclime. Daniel A. Rudd, offered the following, whichwas also adopted: Rosolved, That the ColoredCatholics in Congress assembled in Philadelphia greetthe Apostolate of the Press, now in session in NewYork, and bid them God speed in th«ir noble work. DELEGATE RUDDs PAPER. The first paper of the Congress was read byDaniel A. Rudd, editor of the American CatholicTribune, on Our Young Men The writercomplained that the education of Colored Catholicboys-who after the age of 12 years receive theirsubsequent training in non-Catholic schools, with tb IM frequent result that they become luke warm or driftaway from the safe guidance of the Church. : Thetradesmen of a race, he said, have much to dowith its development; for tnis reason our young menshould be encouraged to learn some trade suitable totheir strength, condition and locality, whether or not

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BROTHER INNOCENT, (>. S, B. they want to follow it in after life. When we havemoulders, bricklayers, mechanics and skilled artisansin every branch of human industry, all educated men,then indeed will we have made some advance. Anorganized effort should be made to induce the trades*unions in the United States to make their lawsconform to the spirit and genius of the Declaration of 135 Independence and of of the Contitution of the UnitedStates. It is less than patriotic.to say the least, forone class of citizens to undertake a draw the lineagainst another class of citizens of a common country.It warps the soul, dwarfs the achievements of man^hood, renders the Government insecure, and is initself perilous. In many parts of the United Statesthe different braches of trade are organized, and oneof the laws found in their codes discriminates againsta class of people who form at leist one^sixth of tinworking population ol this great republic. In all of their halls and m3eting places youwil

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Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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eReverend. Clergv and the Laity who choose to calland express their good wishes for the coming year.It will therefore be impossible fur me to absentmyself irom home, but at the same time 1 havethe pleasure of expressing my wish that your-anion may be of great service and benefit to the CoUored Catholics of this country. Respectfully yours, M. A. COHRIGAN, Archbishop of New York.To Dan. A, Rudd, The following communications were also received, and read: Providence, R. I. Jan., 1, 1889.D^n. A. Rudd, President, Coloied Catholic Cong-ress ;Washington, D. C.;—In behalf of the CatholicYoung Glens National Union, please accept heartycongratulations for your organization. Let me sayto you esto perpetua, color is not a factor to joinwith us. (Signed.) Tuos. MCormack, Secetary C. Y. M. N. U. 41 Carroll Institute, 602, F, Street, Washington, D. CLWm. H. Smitb, President Cjlored Catholic Cong-ress, Washington, D. C- Dear Sir:—In the generalfeelingof interest,inspired by the announcement of an

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LINCOLN C. VALLE, MO affiliaton of the Colored Catholics of the UnitedStates, it is but natural that those of the same faithshoud participate with deepest concern, and particu-larly other societies organized under the protectionand for the promotion of the same interests as those 42 tinder and for which each society represented in theCongress is iabaring. In accordance with a resolution of Carroll Insti-tute agreeable with its sense of duty in this behalf,I gladly tender to the Congress this expression of thegratification and pleasure of the Institue in witness-ing this affiliation, and its congratulation upon thelarge repesentation at and auspcious circumstancessurrounding the first seasion of the Congress and Iwi^h it in the name of the Institute, God speed in itslabor; its future growth, welfare and usefulness. I am further bid, to tender to the Congress anddelegates a cordial invitation to visit and use the libra-ry and rooms of the Institute during their stay in thecity. Yours ve

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Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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y planned tenement houses, as theyare not only dangerous to public health, bufc are more-over hot beds of vice and c.nsequently a standingmenace to morality. In this connection we desire to draw attentionto the discrimination practiced by real estate ownersand agents against respectable Colored people in refu.sing to rent them desirable property because of their■color, or, when renting to them, of charging a higherrate of rental than would be charged other people un->der similar circumstance3. Having learned it* this Congress the admirable and remarkabe efforts thus far accomplished for the-benefit of the African race, either in this country oron tbe African continent, by the various religious or*-ders of the Catholic Church, we tender these zealousand noble hearted pioneers of the Gospel the express-ion of our admiration and gratitude, and trust theywill continue the work of devotion thus done for the-regeneratiou of our people. It is, too, a pleasu e to us to endorse the noblet

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JOHN R. RUDD, OHIO. stand which the American Catholic Tribune, to>which this Congress owes so much, ha? from the starttaken to furnish our people with useful and entanwing reading. In conclusion, after pledging ourselves to carryout to the full extent of our ability the solemn wishses of the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, we ex-press a hope that the fruits of this Convention willbe far reaching and lasting and that our Catholic;brethren throughout the land will generously help us by their sympathy and fellowship in the great andnoble work which we have thus inaugurated for thewelfare —social, moral and intellectual—of our en-tire people. Respectfully, Robt. L. Ruflin, Boston, Mass.; Nicholas Gail-lard, St. Paul, Minn.; P A. MDermott, Pittsburgh,Pa.; Washmgton Parker, New York; R. N. Wood.New York; Lincoln Valle, St. Louis^ Mo.; John R,Rud,Cincinnati, Ohio: Jas. A. Spencer Charleston,S. C.;D. S. Mahoney, Pittsburg, Pa.; W H.Smith,District of Columbia; Dan, A. Rudd, Ohio; Wm

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Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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er s-pent—a red letter day. Headvised the Congress to be prudent and cautious, andtrusted that harmony would characterize itsproceeding. In essential things unity, in non-essential things liberty and in all things charity,said the Cardinal. As His Emminence was about toretire a delegate moved that he be requested to keephis seat and that all members of the Congress beoffered an opportunity to show their respect. Theresolution was addopted and business suspended, andthe delegates passed before the platform, where theywere heartily greeted by His Emminence. The Very Rev. A. B. Leeson, provincial of theOrder of St. Joseph, was requested to address theCongress and made a few remarks. He referred tothe great pleasure it afforded him to be present atthe opening of the Congress and to the interest whichthe Fathers of St. Joseph felt in the Colored race ofAmerica among whom they had labored forseventeen years. The Congress then adjourned until Wednesdaymorning at 10 oclock. •J H 50 c x OU

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21 WEDNESDAYS JOURNAL. January, 2. 1889. The Congress was called to order 10 a. m.. by thetemporary Chairman, W H. Smith. Prayer was of-fered by the Rev. Augustas Tolton. The minutes ofthe previous session read and approved. The commit-tee en credentials reported that the following nameddelegates having produced properly certified credentialwere entitled to set in the Congress as delegates. DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. A. Heathman, Willis J, Smith, James Davis,L. B. Brown, Jno. Cole, Leonard Gant, Chas. H. John-«on, Clarence Tibbetts Patrick Edelin, Benjamin Mar-tin, Wm. Burgess, Wm- Powell, A. J. Stewart, Vin-cent Marshall, Thomas W Short, J. H. Fletcher, E.N.Colbert, L.J.Herbert, Joseph Davis, E.Curtis,John S. Butler, Isaac Landic, A. B. Thomas, RobertCoates, H. A.Jackson, Ananias Herbert, W.S. Lof-ton. MARYLAND. Rev. Jno. R. Slattery, Geo. H. Brown, C. H.Gough, Austin J. Brown, Geo. Smith, Jno. T. Butler,Wm. F. Hall, Thomas A. Johnson, Wallace M. Ma-ion, James Harris, Richard Winters, Wm

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Identifier: 06723491.4720.emory.edu
Title: Three Catholic Afro-American congresses [electronic resource]: a short resume of the work that has been done since the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, letters of the hierarchy, clergy and prominent laymen to the congresses, the sermons of Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop Elder, Archbishop Ryan and Father Mackey, speeches and portraits of prominent colored Catholics, their friends and institutions, the public addresses of the three most remarkable gatherings of Negroes in America : all nicely bound in cloth
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Congress of Colored Catholics of the United States Tolton, Augustine, 1854-1897, inscriber. GEU Valle, Lincoln Charles, b. 1863, inscriber. GEU
Subjects: African American Catholics
Publisher: Cincinnati, O. : American Catholic Tribune
Contributing Library: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library

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nto circulationhis herald of fresh thought from a eultiivattd brain,for the benefit of thousands ot his people lessinformed. He is the harbioger or your progress. In youreffort to lilt the race, remember that you plant siguposts in foundations of solid work. Every man youlift to prominence you lift yourself. It is restlessenergy, unobtrusive yet sublime courage that makemeu great. Again you are welcome u the QueenCitv of the West. THIRD DAYS PROCEEDINGS President Parker in the chair.Alter prayer the following communications wereread. ARCHBISHOP EIPKRS LETTER TO IBS CITIZENSCOMMITTEE. St. Peters Cathedral,lv3T West Eighth Street.Cincinnati. July iHh 1S90.Mr. Louia D. Easton, Chairman of Committee.Dear Sir:—I thauk you for the kind invitationto the Reception you tender the Congress of ColoredCatholics. I accept it with pleasure, and I wid beglad of the opportunity of meeting you on that oeea«sion. Very respectfully your servant in ChkistWilliam Henry Elder,Archbishop of Cir.ciur.ati.

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CAKDINAL I-AYIGKRIK. 120 CAEDINAL MANNINGS LETTER TO THE CON&EESS. Archbishops House. Westminster, S. W., July, 1890. Dan. A. Rudd, Esq.—President Cincinnati, O.,United States of America. ,J40W$ Dear Sir:—The Cardinal desires me to thank youfor inviting him to the Catholic Congress, and to saywith what joy would he eome if he was not 82. Hewishes_ every blessing to you and to those who a*ejoinedwith you in your kind invitation, I am, dearsir, Respectfully. K, Vaugn. BISHOP MAES LETTEE. St. Marys Cathedral, Eighth Street.Covington, Ky., June 30, 1889.Mr. Dan. A. Rudd, Chairman Executive Commit*tee Colored Catholics, Dear Sir:—I have another ap-pointment for the 8th of July, but I shall try to ac-cept your kind invitation to be present at the Cong-ress of Colored Catholics of the United States.Should I be unable to do so, I shall Deo volente, bepresent on the 9th. Sincerely yours in Christ, JCamillus Paul,Bishop of Covington. BISHOP EADMAOHErs LETTER. St. Marys Cathedral,Corne

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